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  • 1.
    Lysell, Roland
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Shelley's Prometheus Unbound in the Light of Contemporary Concepts of Tragedy2018In: European Romantic Review, ISSN 1050-9585, E-ISSN 1740-4657, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 25-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most literary and theater historians emphasize the historical importance of Ibsen, Strindberg, and Andre Antoine's Theatre Libre and as a consequence Shelley's Prometheus Unbound is reduced to a parenthesis in the history of drama. Can contemporary views on tragedy expressed in theoretical works by Hans-Thies Lehmann and put on stage by, for example, Jan Fabre, Romeo Castellucci, and Olivier Dubois, cast a new light on Shelley's play and make it more familiar with the stage? Prometheus Unbound does not replace the lost play of the trilogy of Aeschylus. Rather, it questions the premises of the Greek play and it is to a certain extent a metadrama. The concept of excess, central to Lehmann and Fabre, is one of the characteristics of Shelley's drama. The Aristotelian concept of opsis, neglected in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century tragedy theory, is fundamental in Prometheus Unbound just as are music and voices. Prometheus Unbound is a typically Romantic drama as its action takes place on several levels at the same time: on stage and on a cosmic level, on stage and in a phantom world, on stage and in the mind. The use of metaphors and similes (as, like) are consitutive of the play and they constantly draw our attention to new modalities (memories, dreams, visions) and back again and thus make the modality of the action insecure. In these respects, Shelley's drama can be looked upon as a forerunner of the avantgarde theater of today.

  • 2.
    Ohlsson, Hélène
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Rivaling Femininities-Jenny Lind and Emelie Hogqvist: The Emergence of Multiple Femininities and Female Identity2018In: European Romantic Review, ISSN 1050-9585, E-ISSN 1740-4657, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay studies two rival representations of femininity at the Royal Theatre in Stockholm 1835-45. Jenny Lind and Emelie Högqvist embodied these different femininities through their stage persona, their image, and their legacy. The theoretical perspective is of gender studies with a particular focus on critical femininity studies. The two divas' respective self-representations and strategies for fashioning their celebrity are linked here to the concepts of idealized femininity and pariah femininity. It is argued that both femininities exemplify different branches of modernity that were crucial to nineteenth-century female identity and that still echo in society today.

  • 3.
    Schneider, Magnus Tessing
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Kierkegaard and the Copenhagen Production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni2018In: European Romantic Review, ISSN 1050-9585, E-ISSN 1740-4657, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 43-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the early performance history of Mozart’s Don Giovanni (1787) at Copenhagen’s Royal Theatre, as a context for Søren Kierkegaard’s famous essay on the opera, which appeared in his philosophical work Either/Or: A Fragment of Life (1843). Focusing on the treatment of the supernatural elements in the opera, the author examines Lauritz Kruse’s Danish singspiel translation of the libretto, which was used by the theater from 1807 to 1839. Kruse turned Lorenzo Da Ponte’s enlightened comedy of manners into a romantic tragedy with religious overtones, but his radical reconceptualization of the drama conflicted with the portrayal of the title role by the Danish-Italian baritone Giovanni Battista Cetti who was the Don Giovanni of Copenhagen’s Royal Theatre from 1822 to 1837, and who partly inspired Kierkegaard’s interpretation. Cetti performed the role as a charming and sympathetic character, probably due to the influence of his teacher Giuseppe Siboni who, in his turn, was probably influenced by Luigi Bassi’s portrayal, the singer for whom Mozart had written the role. Hence the responses of Kierkegaard and other contemporary writers to Mozart’s seducer may be read as attempts to find meaning in a dramaturgically incongruous production.

  • 4.
    Wagner, Meike
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Out of Time, into Time: Spatio-temporal Dramaturgies in Zacharias Werner's Der vierundzwanzigste Februar2018In: European Romantic Review, ISSN 1050-9585, E-ISSN 1740-4657, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zacharias Werner's romantic play Der vierundzwanzigste Februar was enormously successful with audiences even as critics devalued it to the extent that it later became almost a synonym for bad taste in literary discourse. Nevertheless, after its premiere in 1810, it became the prototype for the popular but short-lived Schicksalsdrama. Werner's play is almost forgotten today. This essay elaborates on Werner's temporal dramaturgy in respect to its overall stage atmosphere and scenography, its symbolization of temporal objects, and its timing. Additionally, Werner's carefully constructed parallel scenes effectively stage the dynamics of time and temporal tension. My objective here is to investigate the theatrical and performative potential of Werner's Schicksalsdrama, giving more consideration to Werner's outstanding stage crafty mind and his talent as a theatrical dramatist than to his rather obvious literary shortcomings. Consequently, this article looks into the reasons for his stage success rather than judging his play from modern standards of literary quality and canon.

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