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  • 1.
    Andersson, Annica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Valero, Paola
    Meaney, Tamsin
    "I am [not always] a maths hater": Shifting students' identity narratives in context2015In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 143-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, individual students' engagement in learning mathematics in different contexts was explored. The students' narrated identities during their first compulsory upper secondary mathematics course provided a way to understand students' shifts in participation and why these shifts occurred in different contexts at particular times. Identity narratives such as that of being a maths hater were linked to the learning opportunities. The connections between identity narratives and contexts suggest that how students are categorised in mathematics education needs to be queried, as these categorisations have an impact on students' learning of mathematics.

  • 2.
    Andrews, Paul
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    Comparative studies of mathematics teachers’ observable learning objectives: validating low inference codes2009In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 97-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Videotape is an increasingly used tool in cross-national studies of mathematics teaching. However, the means by which videotaped lessons are coded and analysed remains an underdeveloped area with scholars adopting substantially different approaches to the task. In this paper we present an approach based on generic descriptors of mathematics learning objectives. Exploiting live observations in five European countries, the descriptors were developed in a bottom-up recursive manner for application to videotaped lessons from four of these countries, Belgium (Flanders), England, Hungary and Spain. The analyses showed not only that the descriptors were consistently operationalised but also that they facilitated the identification of both similarities and differences in the ways in which teachers conceptualise and present mathematics that resonated with the available literature. In so doing we make both methodological and theoretical contributions to comparative mathematics research in general and debates concerning the national mathematics teaching script in particular.

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    fulltext
  • 3.
    Andrews, Paul
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Hemmi, Kirsti
    Mälardalen University, Sweden.
    Sayers, Judy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    PISA, TIMSS and Finnish mathematics teaching: an enigma in search of an explanation2014In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 87, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finnish students’ success on all three content domains of each of the four cycles ofthe OECD’s Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) has created muchinternational interest. It has also prompted Finnish academics to offer systemic explanationstypically linked to the structural qualities of Finnish schooling and teacher education. Lesswell-known has been the modest mathematics performance of Finnish grade 8 students on thetwo Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) in which Finland hasparticipated, which, when compared with its PISA successes, has created something of anenigma. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on this enigma through analyses of Finnishmathematics classroom practice that draw on two extant data sets—interviews with Finnishteacher educators and video-recordings of sequences of lessons taught on standard topics. Dueto the international interest in Finnish PISA success, the analyses focus primarily on theresonance between classroom practice and the mathematical literacy component of the PISAassessment framework. The analyses indicate that Finnish mathematics didactics are morelikely to explain the modest TIMSS achievements than PISA successes and allude to severalfactors thought to be unique to the Finns, which, unrelated to mathematics teaching practices,may be contributory to the repeated Finnish PISA successes. Some implications for policyborrowingare discussed.

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    fulltext
  • 4. de Toledo e Toledo, Neila
    et al.
    Knijnik, Gelsa
    Valero, Paola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Mathematics education in the neoliberal and corporate curriculum: the case of Brazilian agricultural high schools2018In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 99, no 1, p. 73-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pedagogical principle learning by research guides the current curriculum in agricultural high schools in Brazil. A problematization of the principle shows how (1) it feeds into current neoliberal and corporate agendas in the education sector, and (2) it associates mathematical formalism and abstraction as necessary conditions for the production and use of biotechnology. Data consists of official national and institutional policy documents, as well as interviews conducted with nine former students, along with their school notebooks and tests. The theoretical and methodological framework draws on the work of Michel Foucault. It is argued that neoliberal market values are embedded in the mathematics education, through the articulation of abstract and formal reasoning with techno-scientific knowledge, for the purpose of competitive production. The learning by research principle shapes students' subjectivities to desire becoming techno-scientificized individuals. The ethical question of the subordination of the value of mathematics education to a neoliberal, predominantly marketized logic is raised as a challenge to the role of mathematics in contemporary cultures.

  • 5. FitzSimons, Gail E.
    et al.
    Björklund Boistrup, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    In the workplace mathematics does not announce itself: towards overcoming the hiatus between mathematicseducation and work2017In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 95, no 3, p. 329-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Preparing students for their lives beyond schooling appears to be a universal goal offormal education. Much has been done to make mathematics education more Brealistic,^ but suchactivities nevertheless generally remain within the institutional norms of education. In this article,weassume that pedagogic relations are also an integral part of working life and draw on Bernstein’swork to address their significant features in this context. However, unlike participation in formalmathematics education, where the discipline is central, workers are likely to be confronted by, andneed to reconcile, a range of other valued workplace discourses, both epistemic and social/cultural innature. How might mathematics education work towards overcoming the hiatus between these twovery different institutional settings? This article will argue that the skills of recontextualisation,central to teachers’ work, should be integral to the mathematics education of all future workers. Itwill consider theoretical perspectives on pedagogic discourse and the consequences of diverseknowledge structures at work, with implications for general and vocational mathematics education.

  • 6. Nilsson, Per
    et al.
    Ryve, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Focal event, contextualization, and effective communication in the mathematics classroom2010In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 241-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to develop analytical tools for studying mathematical communication in collaborative activities. The theoretical construct of contextualization is elaborated methodologically in order to study diversity in individual thinking in relation to effective communication. The construct of contextualization highlights issues of diversity in collaborative activities as it emphasizes how students may struggle differently with a learning activity. The interaction of students (12 to 13 years old), playing a specifically designed dice game, is used as an example for illustration. The article shows how accounting for the focal events of the interlocutors, and the contexts in which they contextualize these events, help in organizing our thinking about mathematically effective communication in collaborative activities.

  • 7.
    Norén, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Agency and positioning in a multilingual mathematics classroom2015In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 167-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on data from a first grade multilingual mathematics classroom in Sweden. I explore how students' agency is pronounced in the classroom that actually can be a site where mathematics reform-oriented pedagogy thrives and how the emphasis on language support in such classrooms can support reform-oriented pedagogy. I argue that the emphasis on reform-oriented pedagogy can support the learning of mathematics and a second language, simultaneously. By analysing discursive practices, I show how this supportive relationship operates alongside the on-going processes of normalisation whereby students' mother tongues continue to be erased or ignored.

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    Agency and positioning in a multilingual mathematics classroom
  • 8.
    Pettersson, Astrid
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education.
    Pupil´s matheamtical performance in grades 3 and 6: A longitudinal study1991In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, p. 439-450Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Nilsson, Per
    Mason, John
    Establishing mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions in teacher education2012In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teacher educators' processes of establishing mathematics for teaching in teacher education programs have been recognized as an important area for further research. In this study, we examine how two teacher educators establish and make explicit features of mathematics for teaching within classroom interactions. The study shows how the establishment of mathematics for teaching is dependent on the use of keywords from the mathematics education domain, the introduction of variation, and the use of generic communicative strategies. As such, the study could be seen as a contribution to ongoing research on how mathematics teacher educators interactively deal with mathematics for teaching.

  • 10. Ryve, Andreas
    et al.
    Nilsson, Per
    Pettersson, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Analyzing effective communication in mathematics group work: The role of visual mediators and technical terms2013In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 497-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing and designing productive group work and effective communication constitute ongoing research interests in mathematics education. In this article we contribute to this research by using and developing a newly introduced analytical approach for examining effective communication within group work in mathematics education. By using data from 12 to 13-year old students playing a dice game as well as from a group of university students working with a proof by induction, the article shows how the link between visual mediators and technical terms is crucial in students' attempts to communicate effectively. The critical evaluation of visual mediators and technical terms, and of links between them, is useful for researchers interested in analyzing effective communication and designing environments providing opportunities for students to learn mathematics.

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