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  • 1.
    Björklund, Mats
    et al.
    Department of Animal Ecology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University.
    Almqvist, Gustaf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Rapid spatial genetic differentiation in an invasive species, the round goby Neogobius melanostomus in the Baltic Sea2010In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 2609-2618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analysed the pattern of genetic differentiation among six newly established (around 10 generations) sites of the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) in the southern Baltic Sea by means of nine microsatellite loci and in total 183 individuals. All but one site were within 30 km from each other. We found statistically significant genetic differentiation in ten out of 15 comparisons after Bonferroni correction, and since the species is newly introduced this has happened in less than ten generations. The largest genetic differentiation was found between the two most divergent habitats, while sites with a similar habitat were not significantly differentiated. Estimates of gene flow (Nm) were low and ranged from 1.5 to 5.5. A large proportion of individuals were assigned to one site (Puck), suggesting that this site has acted as a source to the other sites.

  • 2.
    Brodin, Yngve
    et al.
    Department of Popular Biology, Evolutionary Centre Uppsala University.
    Andersson, Mathias H
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    The marine splash midge Telmatogonjaponicus (Diptera; Chironomidae)—extreme and alien?2009In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 1311-1317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We found all developmental stages of the midge offshore windmills near the major Swedish seaport Kalmar in the southern Baltic Sea. This might be the first record of an insect species really inhabiting the offshore areas of the Baltic Sea. A thorough analysis of previous findings of the species, its history in Europe and its ecology indicates that Telmatogeton japonicus (Chironomidae) onT. japonicus quite likely is an alien species in Europe introduced from the Pacific Ocean. Shipping is probably the vector, as all records in the Baltic Sea and several from the Eastern Atlantic Sea are near major seaports. Our analysis further suggests that be both advantageous and disadvantageous to native species in the Baltic Sea. T. japonicus should be kept under observation within monitoring programmes as it might expand its distribution as a result of the construction of new windmills in the Baltic Sea and elsewhere in European marine and brackish water habitats.

  • 3.
    Hagman, Mattias
    et al.
    Univ Sydney, Sch Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
    Shine, Rick
    Univ Sydney, Sch Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
    Effects of invasive cane toads on Australian mosquitoes: does the dark cloud have a silver lining?2007In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the ecological impacts of invasive organisms typically looks only for negative impacts, ignoring the possibility that the wider community might see benefits in some of these effects. To truly understand the impact of invasive species, we need to look as broadly as possible, and incorporate studies on a diversity of variables. The spread of the South American cane toad (Bufo marinus) through tropical Australia is widely viewed as an ecological catastrophe, but anecdotal reports suggest that the invasion of toads may reduce the numbers of mosquitoes (and thus, potentially, the risk they pose to human health). We conducted experiments to determine whether the presence of toad tadpoles affects survival rates, adult body sizes and/or rates of oviposition of four species of disease-carrying mosquitoes. In the laboratory, the presence of toad tadpoles significantly reduced the sizes of adult mosquitoes at emergence, and also reduced survival rates of the larvae of one mosquito species. In field trials, mosquitoes were less likely to oviposit in waterbodies containing toad tadpoles. Accordingly, these data suggest (but do not prove) that toad invasion may reduce mosquito abundance. More generally, any overall evaluation of the impact of an invasive species needs to consider possible benefits (e.g. to human health) as well as negative effects (e.g. to native species). Both types of information are essential to inform community decisions about the management of feral taxa such as the cane toad in Australia.

  • 4. Holopainen, Reetta
    et al.
    Lehtiniemi, Maiju
    Meier, H. E. Markus
    Albertsson, Jan
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Kotta, Jonne
    Viitasalo, Markku
    Impacts of changing climate on the non-indigenous invertebrates in the northern Baltic Sea by end of the twenty-first century2016In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 18, no 10, p. 3015-3032Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biological invasions coupled with climate change drive changes in marine biodiversity. Warming climate and changes in hydrology may either enable or hinder the spread of non-indigenous species (NIS) and little is known about how climate change modifies the richness and impacts of NIS in specific sea areas. We calculated from climate change simulations (RCO-SCOBI model) the changes in summer time conditions which northern Baltic Sea may to go through by the end of the twenty-first century, e.g., 2-5 A degrees C sea surface temperature rise and even up to 1.75 unit decrease in salinity. We reviewed the temperature and salinity tolerances (i.e., physiological tolerances and occurrence ranges in the field) of pelagic and benthic NIS established in-or with dispersal potential to-the northern Baltic Sea, and assessed how climate change will likely affect them. Our findings suggest a future decrease in barnacle larvae and an increase in Ponto-Caspian cladocerans in the pelagic community. In benthos, polychaetes, gastropods and decapods may become less abundant. By contrast, dreissenid bivalves, amphipods and mysids are expected to widen their distribution and increase in abundance in the coastal areas of the northern Baltic Sea. Potential salinity decrease acts as a major driver for NIS biogeography in the northern Baltic Sea, but temperature increase and extended summer season allow higher reproduction success in bivalves, zooplankton, amphipods and mysids. Successful NIS, i.e., coastal crustacean and bivalve species, pose a risk to native biota, as many of them have already demonstrated harmful effects in the Baltic Sea.

  • 5.
    Wikström, Sofia A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Kautsky, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Botany.
    Invasion of a habitat-forming seaweed: effects on associated biota2004In: Biological Invasions, ISSN 1387-3547, E-ISSN 1573-1464, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fucus evanescens is a brown alga of arctic origin that has invaded European coasts. The epiphytic community of F. evanescens in southern Sweden was compared with that of the native Fucus vesiculosus, to examine to what extent an invading seaweed can modify local biodiversity. F. evanescens was much less fouled than F. vesiculosus, supporting both less biomass and fewer species of epiphytes. Multivariate analysis of the most common epiphyte taxa showed that the epiphytic community composition of F. evanescens was not entirely separated from that of F. vesiculosus, but host species contributed significantly to explain the variation in community composition. The biomass of free-living invertebrates was also lower on F. evanescens, although the pattern differed between taxonomic groups. While the biomass of amphipods was lower on F. evanescens, there was no significant difference in biomass of isopods or gastropods between the Fucus species. The good correlation between biomass of epiphytes and free-living animals suggests that the epiphytes play an important role in providing a suitable habitat for many species of free-living epifauna. The study shows that the invasion of F. evanescens affects the environmental conditions for many species associated with the Fucus community but that the direct effect on biodiversity is probably low.

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