Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Marengoni, Alessandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Brescia, Italy.
    Angleman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Meinow, Bettina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Santoni, Giola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Mangialasche, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Rizzuto, Debora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Fastbom, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Melis, Renè
    Parker, Marti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Johnell, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
    Coexisting chronic conditions in the older population: Variation by health indicators2016In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 31, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study analyzes the prevalence and patterns of coexisting chronic conditions in older adults.

    Design: Cross-sectional.

    Participant and setting: A sample of 3363 people >= 60 years living in Stockholm were examined from March 2001 through August 2004.

    Measurements: Chronic conditions were measured with: 1) multimorbidity (>= 2 concurrent chronic diseases); 2) the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale, 3) polypharmacy (>= 5 prescribed drugs), and 4) complex health problems ( chronic diseases and/or symptoms along with cognitive and/or functional limitations).

    Results: A total of 55.6% of 60-74 year olds and 13.4% of those >= 85 years did not have chronic conditions according to the four indicators. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy were the most prevalent indicators: 38% aged 60-74 and 76% aged >= 85 had multimorbidity; 24.3% aged 60-74 and 59% aged >= 85 had polypharmacy. Prevalence of chronic conditions as indicated by the comorbidity index and complex health problems ranged from 16.5% and 1.5% in the 60-74 year olds to 38% and 36% in the 85 + year olds, respectively. Prevalence of participants with 4 indicators was low, varying from 1.6% in those aged 60-74 to 14.9% in those aged >= 85 years. Older age was associated with higher odds of each of the 4 indicators; being a woman, with all indicators but multimorbidity; and lower educational level, only with complex health problems.

    Conclusions: Prevalence of coexisting chronic conditions varies greatly by health indicator used. Variation increases when age, sex, and educational level are taken into account. These findings underscore the need of different indicators to capture health complexity in older adults.

  • 2. Onder, Graziano
    et al.
    Vetrano, Davide L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Marengoni, Alessandra
    Bell, J. Simon
    Johnell, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Palmer, Katie
    Accounting for frailty when treating chronic diseases2018In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 56, p. 49-52Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic diseases are considered to be major determinants of frailty and it could be hypothesized that their treatment may counteract the development of frailty. However, the hypothesis that intensive treatment of chronic diseases might reduce the progression of frailty is poorly supported by existing studies. In contrast, some evidence suggests that intensive treatment of chronic diseases may increase negative health outcomes in frail older adults. In particular, if treatment of symptoms related to chronic diseases (i.e. pain in osteoarthritis, dyspnoea in respiratory disease, motor symptoms in Parkinson disease) might potentially reverse frailty, the benefits related to preventive pharmacological treatment of chronic diseases (i.e. antihypertensive treatment) in patients with prevalent frailty is not certain. In particular, several factors might alter the risk/benefit ratio of a given treatment in persons with frailty. These include: exclusion of frail persons from clinical studies, reduced life expectancy in frail persons, increased susceptibility to iatrogenic events, and functional deficits associated with frailty. Therefore, frailty acts as an effect modifier, by modifying the risks and benefits of chronic disease treatments. This hypothesis must be considered and tested in future clinical intervention studies and clinical guidelines should provide specific recommendations for the treatment of frail people, underlining the pros and the cons of pharmacological treatment and possible targets for therapy in this population. Meanwhile, in older patients, the prescribing process should be individualized and flexible.

  • 3.
    Trevisan, Caterina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Ferrara, Italy.
    Okoye, Chukwuma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Milan-Bicocca, Italy.
    Antonelli Incalzi, Raffaele
    The peculiarities of COVID-19 in older people: Considerations after two years2023In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 117, p. 45-49Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As written by Cicero in De finibus, Aristotle said, “Hominem ad duas res, ad intelligendum et ad agendum, esse natum”, i.e. “Man is born for two things: to understand and to act”. The path of the scientific and medical community dealing with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic reflects precisely this statement, although much remains to be understood and done. This is particularly true for SARS-CoV-2 infection in older people since the complexity of the disease and the related lack of knowledge overlapped with the complexity and vulnerability of this population, which was the most burdened category. In the first pandemic wave, for instance, more than 80% of COVID-19-related deaths occurred in people older than 70 year [1]. Therefore, the only way out of this scenario was to try to understand and plan new actions to improve the prevention and management of the disease.

  • 4. Vancheri, Federico
    et al.
    Strender, Lars-Erik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Montgomery, Henry
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Skånér, Ylva
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Backlund, Lars G.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Coronary risk estimates and decisions on lipid-lowering treatment in primary prevention: Comparison between general practitioners, internists, and cardiologists2009In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 601-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quantitative assessment of an individual's absolute cardiovascular risk is essential for primary prevention. Although risk-scoring tools have been developed for this task, risk estimates are usually made subjectively. We investigated whether general practitioners (GPs), internists and cardiologists differ in their quantitative estimates of cardiovascular risk and their recommendations about lipid-lowering treatment for the same set of patients.

    Methods: Mail survey. Nine written clinical vignettes, four rated high-risk and five rated low-risk according to the Framingham equation, were mailed to 90 randomly selected GPs and to the same number of internists and cardiologists in Sicily. The doctors were then asked to estimate the 10-year coronary risk in each case and to decide whether they would recommend a lipid-lowering treatment.

    Results: In the majority of the nine cases, the cardiologists' risk estimates were significantly lower than those of the other two groups. A higher proportion of internists (mean value 0.68) decided to start treatment than GPs (0.54) or cardiologists (0.57). In all three groups, the doctors' willingness to begin treatment was over 90% when their risk estimate was above 20%, and less than 50% when it fell below this level. Internists were more prone to treat than the other two groups even when their patients' estimated risk was below 20%.

    Conclusion: When presented with the same set of clinical cases, GPs, internists and cardiologists make different quantitative risk estimates and come to different conclusions about the need for lipid-lowering treatment. This may result in over- or under-prescription of lipid-lowering drugs and inconsistencies in the care provided by different categories of doctors.

  • 5. Villani, Emanuele R.
    et al.
    Tummolo, Anita M.
    Palmer, Katie
    Manes Gravina, Ester
    Vetrano, Davide L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Italy.
    Bernabei, Roberto
    Onder, Graziano
    Acampora, Nicola
    Frailty and atrial fibrillation: A systematic review2018In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 56, p. 33-38Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia and its prevalence increases with age. There is a significant correlation between frailty, morbidity and mortality in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease, but the relation between AF and frailty is still under debate. The aim of this study is to systematically review evidence on the association between AF and frailty. A systematic review of articles published between 02/01/2002 and 09/28/2017 according to PRISMA recommendations was carried out. PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for relevant articles. 11 studies were included; one longitudinal, 10 cross-sectional. Only 4 studies assessed the association of frailty with AF, while 7 studies were performed in a sample of participants with AF and did not provide any measure of association between these two conditions. The prevalence of frailty in AF patients ranged from 4.4%-75.4% while AF prevalence in the frail population ranged from 48.2%-75.4%. Selected studies enrolled an overall sample of 9420 participants. Among them, 2803 participants were diagnosed with AF and of these 1517 (54%) were frail and 1286 (46%) were pre-frail or robust. The four studies assessing the association of AF and frailty provided conflicting results. Evidence suggests that frailty is common in persons with AF. More research is needed to better assess the association of these conditions and to identify the optimal therapeutic approach to AF in persons with frailty.

  • 6.
    Zucchelli, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Brescia, Italy.
    Vetrano, Davide L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of Rome, Italy.
    Marengoni, Alessandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Brescia, Italy.
    Grande, Giulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Romanelli, Giuseppe
    Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
    Rizzuto, Debora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Frailty predicts short-term survival even in older adults without multimorbidity2018In: European journal of internal medicine, ISSN 0953-6205, E-ISSN 1879-0828, Vol. 56, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Frailty and multimorbidity are both strongly associated with poor health-related outcomes, including mortality. Being multimorbidity one of the major determinants of frailty, we aimed to explore whether, and to what extent, frailty without multimorbidity plays an independent role in shortening life.

    Methods

    We used data from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K). Among the 3363 adults aged 60+ enrolled at baseline, those without multimorbidity (i.e.: less than two chronic diseases) (N = 1115) have been characterized according to Fried's frailty phenotype (i.e. robust, prefrail, and frail). The association between frailty and mortality was estimated using piecewise proportional hazard regression models in three five-year time periods.

    Results

    Among participants without multimorbidity, 424 (38%) were prefrail and 19 (2%) were frail. During the 15-year follow-up, 263 (24%) participants died: 19%, 29%, and 63% of those who were robust, prefrail, and frail at baseline, respectively. Within the first 5 years of follow-up, prefrail and frail participants had more than doubled mortality risk in comparison to robust ones (HR for pre-frailty 2.08, 95% CI 1.15-3.76; HR for frailty 2.69, 95% CI 1.22-5.97). Beyond 5 years, a trend of increased mortality rate was still detectable for prefrail and frail subjects in comparison to robust ones.

    Conclusions

    Physical frailty and pre-frailty are associated with short-term mortality in a cohort of older adults free from multimorbidity. Frailty could be a clinical indicator of increased risk of negative health outcomes even among subjects without multiple chronic conditions.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf