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  • 1.
    Larsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Silverstein, Merril
    The effects of marital and parental status on informal support and service utilization: A study of older Swedes living alone2004In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 231-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Never-married individuals and childless persons living alone are at greater risk of having insufficient support in old age. This study investigated whether community-dwelling older people, living alone in an urban area of Sweden, benefit from having been previously married and having had children in terms of informal care received, and whether those without such filial support were compensated by formal services. The study sample consisted of 390 persons, 81 years and older, who were interviewed about family support and the use of public eldercare and market-based services. The study showed that parents had considerably higher odds of receiving informal support, whereas previously married individuals without children were no more likely to receive support than their never-married counterparts. Public home-help services did not fully buffer the lack of care among childless individuals. This indicates that even in an advanced welfare state like Sweden, children are assets for receipt of care in old age.

  • 2.
    Majlesi, Ali Reza
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Linköping University, Campus Norrköping, Sweden.
    Ekström, Anna
    Baking together - the coordination of actions in activities involving people with dementia2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 37-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction and collaboration between people with dementia and their spouses in relation to the performance of household chores with the focus on instruction as an interactional context to engage the person with dementia in collaboration to accomplish joint activities. Dementia is generally associated with pathological changes in people's cognitive functions such as diminishing memory functions, communicative abilities and also diminishing abilities to take initiative as well as to plan and execute tasks. Using video recordings of everyday naturally occurring activities, we analyze the sequential organization of actions (see Schegloff, 2007) oriented toward the accomplishment of a joint multi-task activity of baking. The analysis shows the specific ways of collaboration through instructional activities in which the person with dementia exhibits his competence and skills in accomplishing the given tasks through negotiating the instructions with his partner and carrying out instructed actions. Although the driving force of the collaboration seems to be a series of directive sequences only initiated by the partner throughout the baking activity, our analyses highlight how the person with dementia can actively use the material environment including collaborating partners to compensate for challenges and difficulties encountered in achieving everyday, tasks. The sequential organization of instructions and instructed actions are in this sense argued to provide an interactional environment wherein the person with dementia can make contributions to the joint activity in an efficient way. While a collaborator has been described as necessary for a person with dementia to be able to partake in activities, this study shows that people with dementia are not only guided by their collaborators in joint activities but they can also actively use their collaborators in intricate compensatory ways.

  • 3.
    Stranz, Anneli
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sörensdotter, Renita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Interpretations of person-centered dementia care: Same rhetoric, different practices? A comparative study of nursing homes in England and Sweden2016In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 38, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using ethnographic data collected from nursing homes in England and Sweden, this article analyzes how a person-centered approach to dementia care has been interpreted in two different contexts. Based on typical elements of person-centered care identified in previous research, the analysis examines environmental changes and the way care is performed. A discourse of person-centered care is articulated at both nursing homes, which aim to create a good environment and care practice for people with dementia. Although we found similarities in how good care was understood at the two homes, we also found important differences. The results point by to two types of care atmospheres, such that cheerfulness and activity are underlined at the English home and calmness at the Swedish home. Differences in the environments and practices of a person-centered approach can be related to how ways of giving care in the two homes accentuate two different symptoms of dementia. In the English home, the problem of a shrinking world was stressed and the solution was stimulation. At the Swedish home, problems of agitation and anxiety were stressed and the solution was calm and quiet. These differences are discussed in the light of the role of national policy, resources and the organization of work, which can partly clarify why some aspects of what is good care for persons with dementia are underscored in a specific context and not in others.

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