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  • 1. Grunewald, Johan
    et al.
    Kaiser, Ylva
    Ostadkarampour, Mahyar
    Rivera, Natalia V.
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Lötstedt, Britta
    Olsen, Remi-André
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Sylwan, Lina
    Lundin, Sverker
    Käller, Max
    Sandalova, Tatiana
    Ahlgren, Kerstin M.
    Wahlström, Jan
    Achour, Adnane
    Ronninger, Marcus
    Eklund, Anders
    T-cell receptor-HLA-DRB1 associations suggest specific antigens in pulmonary sarcoidosis2016In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 898-909Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In pulmonary sarcoidosis, CD4(+) T-cells expressing T-cell receptor V alpha 2.3 accumulate in the lungs of HLA-DRB1*03(+) patients. To investigate T-cell receptor-HLA-DRB1*03 interactions underlying recognition of hitherto unknown antigens, we performed detailed analyses of T-cell receptor expression on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CD4(+) T-cells from sarcoidosis patients. Pulmonary sarcoidosis patients (n=43) underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage. T-cell receptor alpha and beta chains of CD4(+) T-cells were analysed by flow cytometry, DNA-sequenced, and three-dimensional molecular models of T-cell receptor-HLA-DRB1*03 complexes generated. Simultaneous expression of V alpha 2.3 with the V beta 22 chain was identified in the lungs of all HLA-DRB1*03(+) patients. Accumulated V alpha 2.3/V beta 22-expressing T-cells were highly clonal, with identical or near-identical V alpha 2.3 chain sequences and inter-patient similarities in V beta 22 chain amino acid distribution. Molecular modelling revealed specific T-cell receptor-HLA-DRB1*03-peptide interactions, with a previously identified, sarcoidosis-associated vimentin peptide, (Vim)(429-443) DSLPLVDTHSKRTLL, matching both the HLA peptide-binding cleft and distinct T-cell receptor features perfectly. We demonstrate, for the first time, the accumulation of large clonal populations of specific V alpha 2.3/V beta 22 T-cell receptor-expressing CD4(+) T-cells in the lungs of HLA-DRB1*03(+) sarcoidosis patients. Several distinct contact points between V alpha 2.3/V beta 22 receptors and HLA-DRB1*03 molecules suggest presentation of prototypic vimentin-derived peptides.

  • 2. Heikkilä, Katriina
    et al.
    Madsen, Ida E. H.
    Nyberg, Solja T.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Ahola, Kirsi
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Bjorner, Jakob B.
    Borritz, Marianne
    Burr, Hermann
    Knutsson, Anders
    Koskenvuo, Markku
    Koskinen, Aki
    Nielsen, Martin L.
    Nordin, Maria
    Pahkin, Krista
    Pentti, Jaana
    Rugulies, Reiner
    Salo, Paula
    Shipley, Martin J.
    Suominen, Sakari B.
    Theorell, Töres
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Väänänen, Ari
    Vahtera, Jussi
    Virtanen, Marianna
    Westerholm, Peter J. M.
    Batty, G. David
    Singh-Manoux, Archana
    Kivimäki, Mika
    Job strain and COPD exacerbations: an individual-participant meta-analysis2014In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 247-251Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Lepzien, Rico
    et al.
    Liu, Sang
    Czarnewski, Paulo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Nie, Mu
    Österberg, Björn
    Baharom, Faezzah
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Rankin, Gregory
    Eklund, Anders
    Bottai, Matteo
    Kullberg, Susanna
    Blomberg, Anders
    Grunewald, Johan
    Smed-Sörensen, Anna
    Monocytes in sarcoidosis are potent tumour necrosis factor producers and predict disease outcome2021In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 58, no 1, article id 2003468Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease characterised by granuloma formation and heterogeneous clinical outcome. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine contributing to granuloma formation and high levels of TNF have been shown to associate with progressive disease. Mononuclear phagocytes (MNPs) are potent producers of TNF and highly responsive to inflammation. In sarcoidosis, alveolar macrophages have been well studied. However, MNPs also include monocytes/monocyte-derived cells and dendritic cells, which are poorly studied in sarcoidosis, despite their central role in inflammation.

    Objective To determine the role of pulmonary monocyte-derived cells and dendritic cells during sarcoidosis.

    Methods We performed in-depth phenotypic, functional and transcriptomic analysis of MNP subsets from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 108 sarcoidosis patients and 30 healthy controls. We followed the clinical development of patients and assessed how the repertoire and function of MNP subsets at diagnosis correlated with 2-year disease outcome.

    Results Monocytes/monocyte-derived cells were increased in blood and BAL of sarcoidosis patients compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, high frequencies of blood intermediate monocytes at time of diagnosis associated with chronic disease development. RNA sequencing analysis showed highly inflammatory MNPs in BAL of sarcoidosis patients. Furthermore, frequencies of BAL monocytes/ monocyte-derived cells producing TNF without exogenous stimulation at time of diagnosis increased in patients that were followed longitudinally. In contrast to alveolar macrophages, the frequency of TNFproducing BAL monocytes/monocyte-derived cells at time of diagnosis was highest in sarcoidosis patients that developed progressive disease.

    Conclusion Our data show that pulmonary monocytes/monocyte-derived cells are highly inflammatory and can be used as a predictor of disease outcome in sarcoidosis patients.

  • 4. Liu, Shuo
    et al.
    Therming Jorgensen, Jeanette
    Ljungman, Petter
    Pershagen, Goran
    Bellander, Tom
    Leander, Karin
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Rizzuto, Debora
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). The Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
    Hvidtfeldt, Ulla A.
    Nielsen, Ole Raaschou
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Brnekree, Bert
    Strak, Maciej
    Chen, Jie
    Mehta, Amar
    Atkinson, Richard W.
    Bauwelrick, Mariska
    Varraso, Raphaelle
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Brandt, Jorgen
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Fecht, Daniela
    Gulliver, John
    Hertel, Ole
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Janssen, Nicole A. H.
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Ketzel, Matthias
    Klompmaker, Jochem O.
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Oftedal, Bente
    Peters, Annette
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Rodopoulou, Sophia P.
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Kristoffersen, Doris Tove
    Sigsgaard, Torben
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Vienneau, Danielle
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoek, Gerard
    Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana
    Long-term exposure to low-level air pollution and incidence of asthma: the ELAPSE project2021In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 57, no 6, article id 2003099Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution has been linked to childhood-onset asthma, although evidence is still insufficient. Within the multicentre project Effects of Low-Level Air Pollution: A Study in Europe (ELAPSE), we examined the associations of long-term exposures to particulate matter with a diameter <2.5 mu m (PM2.5), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and black carbon (BC) with asthma incidence in adults.

    Methods: We pooled data from three cohorts in Denmark and Sweden with information on asthma hospital diagnoses. The average concentrations of air pollutants in 2010 were modelled by hybrid land-use regression models at participants' baseline residential addresses. Associations of air pollution exposures with asthma incidence were explored with Cox proportional hazard models, adjusting for potential confounders.

    Results: Of 98326 participants, 1965 developed asthma during a mean follow-up of 16.6 years. We observed associations in fully adjusted models with hazard ratios of 1.22 (95% CI 1.04-1.43) per 5 mu g.m(-3) for PM2.5, 1.17 (95% CI 1.10-1.25) per 10 mu g.m(-3) for NO2 and 1.15 (95% CI 1.08-1.23) per 0.5 x 10(-5) m(-1) for BC. Hazard ratios were larger in cohort subsets with exposure levels below the European Union and US limit values and possibly World Health Organization guidelines for PM2.5 and NO2. NO 2 and BC estimates remained unchanged in two-pollutant models with PM2.5, whereas PM2.5 estimates were attenuated to unity. The concentration-response curves showed no evidence of a threshold.

    Conclusions: Long-term exposure to air pollution, especially from fossil fuel combustion sources such as motorised traffic, was associated with adult-onset asthma, even at levels below the current limit values.

  • 5. Luecken, Malte D.
    et al.
    Zaragosi, Laure-Emmanuelle
    Madissoon, Elo
    Sikkema, Lisa
    Firsova, Alexandra B.
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    De Domenico, Elena
    Kümmerle, Louis
    Saglam, Adem
    Berg, Marijn
    Gay, Aurore C. A.
    Schniering, Janine
    Mayr, Christoph H.
    Abalo, Xesús M.
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Larsson, Ludvig
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sountoulidis, Alexandros
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Teichmann, Sarah A.
    Van Eunen, Karen
    Koppelman, Gerard H.
    Saeb-Parsy, Kourosh
    Leroy, Sylvie
    Powell, Pippa
    Sarkans, Ugis
    Timens, Wim
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    van den Berge, Maarten
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Horváth, Peter
    Denning, Jessica
    Papatheodorou, Irene
    Schultze, Joachim L.
    Schiller, Herbert B.
    Barbry, Pascal
    Petoukhov, Ilya
    Misharin, Alexander V.
    Adcock, Ian M.
    von Papen, Michael
    Theis, Fabian J.
    Samakovlis, Christos
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Meyer, Kerstin B.
    Nawijn, Martijn C.
    The discovAIR project: a roadmap towards the Human Lung Cell Atlas2022In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 60, no 2, article id 2102057Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Human Cell Atlas (HCA) consortium aims to establish an atlas of all organs in the healthy human body at single-cell resolution to increase our understanding of basic biological processes that govern development, physiology and anatomy, and to accelerate diagnosis and treatment of disease. The Lung Biological Network of the HCA aims to generate the Human Lung Cell Atlas as a reference for the cellular repertoire, molecular cell states and phenotypes, and cell-cell interactions that characterise normal lung homeostasis in healthy lung tissue. Such a reference atlas of the healthy human lung will facilitate mapping the changes in the cellular landscape in disease. The discovAIR project is one of six pilot actions for the HCA funded by the European Commission in the context of the H2020 framework programme. discovAIR aims to establish the first draft of an integrated Human Lung Cell Atlas, combining single-cell transcriptional and epigenetic profiling with spatially resolving techniques on matched tissue samples, as well as including a number of chronic and infectious diseases of the lung. The integrated Human Lung Cell Atlas will be available as a resource for the wider respiratory community, including basic and translational scientists, clinical medicine, and the private sector, as well as for patients with lung disease and the interested lay public. We anticipate that the Human Lung Cell Atlas will be the founding stone for a more detailed understanding of the pathogenesis of lung diseases, guiding the design of novel diagnostics and preventive or curative interventions.

  • 6. Osadnik, Christian R.
    et al.
    Brighton, Lisa J.
    Burtin, Chris
    Cesari, Matteo
    Lahousse, Lies
    Man, Will D. C.
    Marengoni, Alessandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Sajnic, Andreja
    Singer, Jonathan P.
    ter Beek, Lies
    Tsiligianni, Ioanna
    Varga, Janos T.
    Pavanello, Stefano
    Maddocks, Matthew
    European Respiratory Society statement on frailty in adults with chronic lung disease2023In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 62, no 2, article id 2300442Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Frailty is a complex, multidimensional syndrome characterised by a loss of physiological reserves that increases a person's susceptibility to adverse health outcomes. Most knowledge regarding frailty originates from geriatric medicine; however, awareness of its importance as a treatable trait for people with chronic respiratory disease (including asthma, COPD and interstitial lung disease) is emerging. A clearer understanding of frailty and its impact in chronic respiratory disease is a prerequisite to optimise clinical management in the future. This unmet need underpins the rationale for undertaking the present work. This European Respiratory Society statement synthesises current evidence and clinical insights from international experts and people affected by chronic respiratory conditions regarding frailty in adults with chronic respiratory disease. The scope includes coverage of frailty within international respiratory guidelines, prevalence and risk factors, review of clinical management options (including comprehensive geriatric care, rehabilitation, nutrition, pharmacological and psychological therapies) and identification of evidence gaps to inform future priority areas of research. Frailty is underrepresented in international respiratory guidelines, despite being common and related to increased hospitalisation and mortality. Validated screening instruments can detect frailty to prompt comprehensive assessment and personalised clinical management. Clinical trials targeting people with chronic respiratory disease and frailty are needed.

  • 7. Willers, Saskia M.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Charlotta
    Gidhagen, Lars
    Nilsson, Mats E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institute.
    Pershagen, Göran
    Bellander, Tom
    Fine and coarse particulate air pollution in relation to respiratory health in Sweden2013In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 924-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health effects have repeatedly been associated with residential levels of air pollution. However, it is difficult to disentangle effects of long-term exposure to locally generated and long-range transported pollutants, as well as to exhaust emissions and wear particles from road traffic. We aimed to investigate effects of exposure to particulate matter fractions on respiratory health in the Swedish adult population, using an integrated assessment of sources at different geographical scales. The study was based on a nationwide environmental health survey performed in 2007, including 25 851 adults aged 18-80 years. Individual exposure to particulate matter at residential addresses was estimated by dispersion modelling of regional, urban and local sources. Associations between different size fractions or source categories and respiratory outcomes were analysed using multiple logistic regression, adjusting for individual and contextual confounding. Exposure to locally generated wear particles showed associations for blocked nose or hay fever, chest tightness or cough, and restricted activity days with odds ratios of 1.5-2 per 10-mu g.m(-3) increase. Associations were also seen for locally generated combustion particles, which disappeared following adjustment for exposure to wear particles. In conclusion, our data indicate that long-term exposure to locally generated road wear particles increases the risk of respiratory symptoms in adults.

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