Change search
Refine search result
1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Bennike, Niels H.
    et al.
    Palangi, Lina
    Bråred Christensson, Johanna
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Zachariae, Claus
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by hydroperoxides of limonene and dose-response relationship-A repeated open application test (ROAT) study2019In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 208-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Contact allergy to oxidized limonene, with hydroperoxides of limonene (Lim-OOHs) as the main allergens, is common. However, high proportions of weak positive and doubtful patch test reactions have been reported. Objectives: To determine the clinical relevance, elicitation threshold and dose-response relationship of Lim-OOHs in individuals with a positive or doubtful patch test reaction to standard Lim-OOHs 0.3% pet. Methods: A multicentre 3-week double-blind vehicle-controlled repeated open application test (ROAT) study with a simulated fine fragrance containing Lim-OOHs at 1260, 420 and 140 ppm, equal to a dose/area per application of Lim-OOHs of 3.0, 0.99 and 0.33 mu g/cm(2), was performed. Results: Among 11 subjects allergic to Lim-OOHs, 11 (100%), 7 (64%), and 3 (27%), respectively, reacted to the applied doses. No reactions were seen in 17 healthy controls exposed to the highest dose. This difference in reactivity was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). Among 13 subjects with doubtful patch test reactions to Lim-OOHs, two (15%) had positive ROAT reactions to the highest Lim-OOH dose applied (P = 0.36 as compared with controls). Conclusions: Contact allergy to Lim-OOHs is of clinical relevance in patients with positive patch test reactions. A doubtful patch test reaction to Lim-OOHs 0.3% pet. can be of clinical relevance.

  • 2. Elliott, John F.
    et al.
    Ramzy, Ahmed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Moffat, Wayne
    Suzuki, Kunimasa
    Severe intractable eyelid dermatitis probably caused by exposure to hydroperoxides of linalool in a heavily fragranced shampoo2017In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 114-115Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3. Hamann, Dathan
    et al.
    Thyssen, Jacob P.
    Hamann, Carsten R.
    Hamann, Curtis
    Menné, Torkil
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    Spiewak, Radoslaw
    Maibach, Howard
    Lundgren, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lidén, Carola
    Jewellery: alloy composition and release of nickel, cobalt and lead assessed with the EU synthetic sweat method2015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 231-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Several studies have shown nickel and cobalt release from jewellery by using spot tests, but the metal composition of jewellery is largely unknown. Objectives. To evaluate the metal composition of a large worldwide sample of mainly inexpensive jewellery items, and investigate the release of nickel, cobalt and lead from a subsample by using EN 1811: 1998-required methods. Methods. A total of 956 metallic jewellery components were examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A subsample of 96 jewellery items purchased in the United States were investigated for nickel, cobalt and lead release by the use of artificial sweat immersion and plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Results. Eighteen elements were detected. The 10 most frequently occurring were, in order of frequency, copper, iron, zinc, nickel, silver, chromium, tin, manganese, lead, and cobalt. Release of nickelwas noted from 79 of the 96 US samples (0.01-98 mu g/cm(2)/week), release of cobalt from 35 samples (0.02-0.5 mu g/cm(2)/week), and release of lead from 37 samples (0.03-2718 mu g/cm(2)/week). Conclusions. We present here a comprehensive list of the most frequently encountered metals in jewellery and fashion accessories. Different allergenic and non-allergenic metals are utilized. We also report the frequent release of nickel, cobalt and lead from these objects, despite legislative restrictions.

  • 4. Jakobsen, Stig S.
    et al.
    Liden, Carola
    Soballe, Kjeld
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    Menne, Torkil
    Lundgren, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bregnbak, David
    Moller, Per
    Jellesen, Morten S.
    Thyssen, Jacob P.
    Failure of total hip implants: metals and metal release in 52 cases2014In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 71, no 6, p. 319-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe pathogenesis of total joint replacement failure is multifactorial. One hypothesis suggests that corrosion and wear of alloys result in metal ion release, which may then cause sensitization and even implant failure, owing to the acquired immune reactivity. ObjectivesTo assess cobalt, nickel and chromium(VI) release from, and the metal composition of, failed metal-on-ethylene total hip replacements. Materials/methodsImplant components from 52 revision cases were evaluated with spot tests for free nickel, cobalt, and chromium (VI) ions. Implant composition was determined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, and information on the reason for revision and complications in relation to surgery was collected from the medical charts when possible (72%). For 10 implants, corrosion was further characterized with scanning electron microscopy. ResultsWe detected cobalt release from three of 38 removed femoral heads and from one of 24 femoral stems. Nickel release was detected from one of 24 femoral stems. No chromium(VI) release was detected. ConclusionsWe found that cobalt and nickel were released from some failed total hip arthroplasties, and corrosion was frequently observed. Metal ions and particles corroded from metal-on-polyethylene may play a role in the complex aetiopathology of implant failure.

  • 5.
    Lundgren, Lennart
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Moberg, Cecilia
    Liden, Carola
    Do insulation products of man-made vitreous fibres still cause skin discomfort?2014In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 351-360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Man-made vitreous fibres (MMVFs) are used in products for insulation and as reinforcement in materials. Contamination of the skin may arise through direct or indirect contact, and from the deposition of airborne fibres. The scientific basis regarding the effects on skin of MMVFs dates from 1970-1980. Objectives. To investigate whether currently used insulation MMVF products still cause skin discomfort. Methods. Focus group interviews and structured interviews were performed among workers engaged in insulation tasks and among do-it-yourself consumers with a recent experience of MMVF products. Results. A majority of interviewees experienced skin discomfort when handling MMVF products. Complaints caused by traditional (yellow) glass fibre products were more severe than those caused by products of rock or slag wool fibres. The wrists, forearms, neck and face were the locations where the skin was most affected. The situations causing problems varied between occupational tasks, but working with the hands over the head or in narrow spaces were described as the worst situations. Building construction apprentices performed insulation tasks more often than senior workers. Conclusions. MMVF insulation products do still cause skin discomfort. Updated knowledge about people's experiences of work with such products should influence legislation.

  • 6.
    Ramzy, Ahmad G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Pei, Mansoureh N.
    Samuelsson, Kristin
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Investigation of diethylthiourea and ethyl isothiocyanate as potent skin allergens in chloroprene rubber2015In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 139-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Exposure to chloroprene rubber has resulted in numerous cases of allergic contact dermatitis, attributed to organic thiourea compounds used as vulcanization accelerators. However, thiourea compounds are not considered to be strong haptens.

    Objectives

    To analyse common commercial chloroprene materials for their contents of diethylthiourea (DETU), dibutylthiourea (DBTU), diphenylthiourea (DPTU), and their degradation products, isothiocyanates; and to investigate the sensitization potencies of possible degradation products of the mentioned thiourea compounds.

    Methods

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (MS) was used for quantification of organic thiourea compounds in chloroprene products, such as medical, sports and diving gear; isothiocyanates were measured by solid-phase microextraction/gas chromatography/MS. Sensitization potencies were determined with the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA).

    Results

    DETU was identified at concentrations of 2.7-9.4 mu g/cm(2) in all samples, whereas neither DBTU nor DPTU was detected. At 37 degrees C, degradation of DETU in the materials to ethyl isothiocyanate (EITC) was detected. EITC and ethyl isocyanate showed extreme and strong sensitization potencies, respectively, in the LLNA.

    Conclusions

    DETU can act as a prehapten, being degraded to EITC when subjected to body temperature upon skin contact. EITC could thus be the culprit behind allergic contact dermatitis caused by chloroprene rubber.

  • 7. Rudbäck, Johanna
    et al.
    Hagvall, Lina
    Börje, Anna
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Karlberg, Ann-Therese
    Characterization of skin sensitizers from autoxidized citronellol - impact of the terpene structure on the autoxidation process2014In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 329-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Citronellol is a frequently used fragrance compound in consumer products. It is present in fragrance mix II, which is used for screening of contact allergy to fragrances. Because of its chemical structure, citronellol could be susceptible to autoxidation. Objectives. To compare the behaviour of citronellol with that of the structurally similar compounds linalool and geraniol, in terms of ability to autoxidize, the products formed, and the sensitization potencies of these. Methods. Citronellol was exposed to air, and autoxidation was followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis after derivatization of thermolabile compounds. The sensitizing potencies of the oxidation mixture and its major oxidation compounds were examined with the local lymph node assay. Results. The concentration of citronellol decreased while the sensitization potency increased in air-exposed samples over time, with hydroperoxides being identified as the major oxidation products and main skin sensitizers. Conclusions. The present study shows the impact of the absence of the 2,3-double bond in the citronellol structure on the oxidation pathways for formation of oxidation products. The study also shows the usefulness of our new GC-MS method for quantification of the citronellol oxidation products, especially the hydroperoxides. The investigated citronellol hydroperoxides could be important allergens, owing to the high concentrations detected and frequent exposure to citronellol in the population.

  • 8. Thyssen, Jacob P.
    et al.
    Skare, Lizbet
    Lundgren, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Menne, Torkil
    Johansen, Jeanne D.
    Maibach, Howard I.
    Liden, Carola
    Sensitivity and specificity of the nickel spot (dimethylglyoxime) test2010In: Contact Dermatitis, ISSN 0105-1873, E-ISSN 1600-0536, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 279-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the DMG test. Methods: DMG spot testing, chemical analysis according to the EN 1811 reference method, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) were performed concomitantly on 96 metallic components from earrings recently purchased in San Francisco. Results: The sensitivity of the DMG test was 59.3% and the specificity was 97.5% based on DMG-test results and nickel release concentrations determined by the EN 1811 reference method. Conclusions: The DMG test has a high specificity but a modest sensitivity. It may serve well for screening purposes. Past exposure studies may have underestimated nickel release from consumer items.

1 - 8 of 8
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf