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  • 1. Elmberg, Johan
    et al.
    Hagman, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Löwenborg, Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Pettersson, Gustav
    Voisin, Anais
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kärvemo, Simon
    Movements and habitat choice of resident and translocated adult female Grass Snakes (Natrix natrix) during the egg-laying period2019In: Herpetological Journal, ISSN 0268-0130, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 245-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used externally applied transmitters to study movements of female grass snakes (Natrix natrix) during the egg-laying period in a near-urban landscape in Sweden. Half of the studied snakes were residents while the other half were translocated individuals with no previous experience of the area. As predicted, resident females moved more goal-oriented and shorter distances than did translocated individuals. Habitat use did not differ between resident and translocated snakes; they were typically found in bushes, reeds, and tall vegetation. Habitat preference (use in relation to availability) showed that bushy habitats, tall grassy vegetation and reedbeds were over-used in proportion to availability, whereas forest and open grass lawns were used less than expected based on availability. Our study highlights the importance of preserving and restoring linear habitat components providing shelter and connectivity in conservation of grass snakes. We suggest that externally applied transmitters are a better option than surgically implanted ones in movement studies of grass snakes, and that translocation as a conservation method for snakes has drawbacks.

  • 2.
    Hagman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Elmberg, Johan
    Kärvemo, Simon
    Löwenborg, Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Grass snakes (Natrix natrix) in Sweden decline together with their anthropogenic nesting-environments2012In: Herpetological Journal, ISSN 0268-0130, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 199-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we show that the number of grass snake (Natrix natrix L.) specimens deposited in Swedish museum collections has declined in the last eighty years, and that this is correlated with a dramatic national decrease in the number of livestock holdings. These results support the hypothesis that Swedish grass snakes are declining and that this may be linked to a loss of important nesting-environments provided by open manure heaps in small-scale farming. Our study suggests that information obtained from museum databases potentially may be used to explore population trends for snakes and other reptiles.

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