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  • 1.
    Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Horneman, Göran
    Department of Psychology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid
    Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg.
    Neuropsychological progress during 14 yearsafter severe traumatic brain injury in childhoodand adolescence2004In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 921-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the impact of time since injury on  neuropsychological and psychosocial outcome after serious TBI in childhood or adolescence. Methods: The subjects were eight patients with serious TBI sustained at a mean age of 14 years who had been assessed neuropsychological at one, seven and 14 years after TBI. A retrospective longitudinal design was chosen to describe the development in six neuropsychological domains on basis of the assessments. Psychosocial data were gathered from clinical knowledge and a semi-structured interview at 14 years after TBI. Results: Performance of verbal IQ shows a declining trend over the three assessments, that the performance of attention and working memory is low and that verbal learning is the cognitive domain, which exhibits the largest impairments. The main psychosocial result is that three of the eight subjects go from a school situation with no adjustments to adult life with an early retirement. Conclusions: Time since insult is an important factor when assessing outcome after TBI in childhood and adolescence and that assessment of final outcome should not be done before adulthood.

  • 2.
    Aaro Jonsson, Catherine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Leis Ljungmark, Mia
    Institution for clinical sciences, Dept. of pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University.
    Emanuelson, Ingrid
    Institution for clinical sciences, Dept. of pediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University.
    Long-term cognitive outcome after neurosurgically treated childhood traumatic brain injury2009In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 23, no 13-14, p. 1008-1016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the cognitive long term outcome of two cohorts of patients neurosurgically treated for childhood traumatic brain injury (CTBI), either in 1987-1991 according to an older concept, or 1997-2001 with a stronger emphasis on volume targeted interventions. Research design and methods: Participants in the two cohorts were subject to an extensive neuropsychological assessment, 13.2 and 6.1 years post injury, respectively. In a between group design, assessment results of the two cohorts, n 18 and n 23, were compared to each other and to controls. Data were analyzed with multivariate analyses of variance. Results: Long-term cognitive deficits for both groups of similar magnitude and character were observed in both groups. Abilities were especially low regarding executive and memory function and verbal IQ. The cognitive results are discussed in terms of  vulnerability of verbal functions and decreased executive control over memory-functions. Conclusions: There is a definite need for long term follow up of cognitive deficits after neurosurgically treated CTBI, also with the newer neurosurgical concept. Verbal learning and the executive control over memory functions should be addressed with interventions aimed at restoration, coping and compensation.

  • 3. Jonsson, Catherine Aaro
    et al.
    Catroppa, Cathy
    Godfrey, Celia
    Smedler, Ann-Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Anderson, Vicki
    Individual profiles of predictors and their relations to 10 years outcome after childhood traumatic brain injury2013In: Brain Injury, ISSN 0269-9052, E-ISSN 1362-301X, Vol. 27, no 7-8, p. 831-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Outcome after childhood traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is heterogeneous, with several predictors influencing long-term outcome. Method: This exploratory study used person-oriented cluster analysis to investigate individual profiles of medical, psychological and social predictors and their relation to longitudinal development in a sample of 127 participants with mild, moderate and severe CTBI. Outcome of cognitive, adaptive and academic function was measured at 30 months and 10 years post-injury. Results: A nine-cluster solution, explaining 67% of the variance in the sample, resulted in two clusters with individuals with mostly mild injuries, five with mostly moderate injured individuals and two clusters with severely injured individuals. Best outcome at 10 years post-injury had a cluster with individuals with moderate injuries, young age at injury, average socioeconomic status (SES) and high pre-injury adaptive function. Worst outcome had a small cluster with severely injured individuals, young age at injury, average SES and average pre-injury adaptive function. Conclusions: The findings suggest that pre-injury adaptive function is an influential predictor of outcome following moderate CTBI. Age at injury in the severe group appears to have increased influence over time, with younger age at injury associated with reduced outcome at 10 years after severe CTBI.

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