Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Adlerz, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Beckman, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Holback, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Tehranian, Roya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Cortés Toro, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Iverfeldt, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry and Neurotoxicology.
    Accumulation of the amyloid precursor-like protein APLP2 and reduction of APLP1 in retinoic acid-differentiated human neuroblastoma cells upon curcumin-induced neurite retraction2003In: Brain Research. Molecular Brain Research, ISSN 0169-328X, E-ISSN 1872-6941, Vol. 119, no 1, p. 62-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) belongs to a conserved gene family, also including the amyloid precursor-like proteins, APLP1 and APLP2. The function of these three proteins is not yet fully understood. One of the proposed roles of APP is to promote neurite outgrowth. The aim of this study was to investigate the regulation of the expression levels of APP family members during neurite outgrowth. We observed that retinoic acid (RA)-induced neuronal differentiation of human SH-SY5Y cells resulted in increased expression of APP, APLP1 and APLP2. We also examined the effect of the NFκB, AP-1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibitor curcumin (diferuloylmethane) on the RA-induced expression levels of these proteins. We found that treatment with curcumin counteracted the RA-induced mRNA expression of all APP family members. In addition, we observed that curcumin treatment resulted in neurite retraction without any effect on cell viability. Surprisingly, curcumin had differential effects on the APLP protein levels in RA-differentiated cells. RA-induced APLP1 protein expression was blocked by curcumin, while the APLP2 protein levels were further increased. APP protein levels were not affected by curcumin treatment. We propose that the sustained levels of APP and the elevated levels of APLP2, in spite of the reduced mRNA expression, are due to altered proteolytic processing of these proteins. Furthermore, our results suggest that APLP1 does not undergo the same type of regulated processing as APP and APLP2.

  • 2.
    Östlund, Pernilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Lindegren, Heléne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Pettersson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Bedecs, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Altered insulin receptor processing and function in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cell lines2001In: Brain Research. Molecular Brain Research, ISSN 0169-328X, E-ISSN 1872-6941, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 161-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The underlying neurochemical changes contributing to prion-induced neurodegeneration remain largely unknown. This study showsthat scrapie infection induced a 2-fold increase of insulin receptor (IR) protein and aberrantly processed IR b-chain in scrapie-infectedN2a neuroblastoma cells (ScN2a) as measured byWestern blot of immunoprecipitated IR, in the absence of increased IR mRNA. ElevatedIR protein level was further confirmed in an independently scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cell line N1E-115 (ScN1E-115). Proliferationstudies showed that the increased IR level in ScN2a did not result in an increased insulin-mediated cell growth compared to normal N2a125 cells. Binding studies indicated that this apparent paradox was due to a 65% decrease in specific [ I]insulin binding sites in ScN2a whencompared to the amount of immunoreactive IR, although the IR binding affinity was unchanged. Analysis of insulin stimulated IR tyrosinephosphorylation showed a slight but not significant reduction in ScN2a, when related to the increased level of immunoreactive IR.However, comparing the IR tyrosine phosphorylation to the loss of binding sites in ScN2a, we demonstrated an increased IR tyrosinephosphorylation of the remaining functional IR. In addition to these differences in IR properties, the basal extracellular signal regulatedkinase-2 (ERK2) phosphorylation detected by Western blot, was significantly elevated and the insulin stimulated ERK2 phosphorylationwas subsequently decreased in ScN2a. Together, these data show that scrapie infection affects the level and processing of the IR andsignal transduction mediated by the IR in neuroblastoma cells, as well as induces an elevated basal ERK2 phosphorylation. Aberrantregulation of neuroprotective receptors may contribute to neurodegeneration in prion diseases.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf