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  • 1.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Johnny Karlsson: Spill: Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid [[Waste: Osseous Materials, Craft and Networks in the Mälaren Region during the Middle Ages]2018In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, p. 254-261Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    White light – white heat.: The use of fire as light and heat source in an atrium house in Roman Pompeii’2005In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 13, p. 59-75Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    If we are quiet, will things cry out?2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 41-45Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Burström, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Looking into the recent past.: Extending and exploring the field of archaeology.2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The archaeology of the recent past is a growing field of research. Is this merely a chronological extension of the field of archaeology, or is it something more? What motivates an archaeological interest in a period of time for which there are so many other sources of information? Here it is argued that the archaeology of the recent past is important not only to bring to light other stories than those generally told, but also to bring to the fore theoretical issues of general relevance for archaeology. The latter concern what material remains can be more than just potential sources of information about the past.

  • 5.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Are we there yet? Archaeology and the postmodern in the new millennium2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 109-129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present text discusses the significance of the postmodern condition in contemporary archaeology. Five themes associated with postmodernism are discussed (a) the relativization of truth, knowledge, and meaning, (b) the fragmentation of the grand narrative, (c) the relation between agency and discourse, (d) pluralism, multivocality, and heterogeneity, and (e) rhetoric and styles of writing. In contemporary debate it has been suggested that postmodernism is a past phase and that these contested issues have become less important. It is, however, argued here that these are by no means resolved, but rather bypassed by shifting focus to archaeology as a contemporary practice or, in theoretical terms, towards particularistic neo-materialist ontologies.

  • 6.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Recension av Åsa Berggrens avhandling 'Med kärret som källa. Om begreppen offer och ritual inom arkeologin'2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 228-230Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The materiality of the ancient dead: Post-burial practices and ontologies of death in southern sweden AD 800–12002016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 137-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text discusses reuse and modications of older graves in southern Sweden during the Late Iron Age and early medieval period (c. 9th to 12th centuries AD). Post-burial practices in the Late Iron Age have in general been interpreted as means to negotiate status, identity and rights to land, while in the later part of the period they are comprehended as expressions of religious insecurity and syncretism. In this text, the continuity of post-burial practices during the whole period is stressed and instead of general top-down interpretative models, the ontological status and material aspects of death, dead bodies and their graves is emphasized. It is argued that the post-burial actions generally constituted ways of relating to a specific type of materiality, the bones of the ancient dead, which transgress binary categorizations such as living–dead, past–present, heathen–Christian, and human–nonhuman. The argument builds on recently excavated sites in southern Sweden: Bogla, Broby Bro, Lilla Ullevi, Valsta and Vittene.

  • 8.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    A shattered tomb of scattered people: the Alvastra dolmen in light of stable isotopes2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 113-141Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nature:Cultures: Heritage, Sustainability and Feminist Posthumanism2015In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 23, p. 109-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper makes use of feminist posthumanism to outline how a range of heritage policies, practices and strategies, partly through their base in social constructivism have a clear anthropocentric focus. Not only do they risk downplaying materiality, but also a number of human and non-human others, driving a wedge between nature and culture. This may in turn be an obstacle for the use of heritage in sustainable development as it deals with range of naturalized others as if they have no agency and leaves the stage open for appropriation and exploitation.

    This paper probes into what heritage could be in the wake of current climate and environmental challenges if approached differently. It explores how a selection of feminist posthumanisms challenge the distinction between nature:culture in a way that could shift the approach to sustainability in heritage making from a negative to an affirmative framing.

  • 10.
    Fredengren, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Posthumanism, the Transcorporeal and Biomolecular Archaeology2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 53-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will discuss the tensions between the humanities and sciences within archaeology and examine how these tensions exist, both in how identity and personhood are understood, and in different views of epistemology and ontology. From a basis in critical posthumanism it is argued that unnecessary boundaries have been set up between the body and the environment. The concept of the transcorporeal allows for rethinking the connection between bodies and landscape, enabling us to discuss the environment inside. This approach can provide an alternative framing for the use of the sciences in archaeology, particularly for osteology and DNA and isotope analysis. Biomolecular mapping of body networks allows for a better understanding of the configuration of specific historic bodies as well as for discussing ethics. Furthermore, there may be a case for describing analysed bodies as figurations, rather than as identities.

  • 11.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Mesolithic skull depositions at Kanaljorden, Motala, Sweden2011In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 19, p. 244-246Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Holm, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Dating of Västerhus Cemetery: A Contribution to the Study of Christianization in Jämtland2006In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 14, p. 109-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the author uses different dating methods to try to show that the Västerhus cemetery was established between c. 1125 and 1250 and that it ceased to be used between c. 1375 and 1500. This time period is later than the dates proposed previously on the basis of 14C analyses of skeletons from the cemetery. In the author’s opinion, the 14C dates are probably misleading on account of reservoir effects.

    The Västerhus church and cemetery – which yielded one of the best preserved and most well-studied medieval skeletal materials in northern Europe – were thus not established at the time of Jämtland’s official Christianization, as earlier claimed, but instead one or a few generations later. The author points out that several other early churches and cemeteries in Jämtland are just as late. Similar gaps in time between the official Christianization and the widespread building of churches are also known from other parts of Scandinavia.

  • 13. Högberg, Anders
    et al.
    Fahlander, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The changing roles of archaeology in Swedish museums2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 13-19Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last few decades archaeology in Swedish museums have undergone major changes. From being a recognizable part of museum activities, archeology has more and more disappeared from the local museums. In a competitive market, a transparent economy is required. No grants, subventions or contribution founded money allowed. All work must be financed by the market. In many regions, the consequence of this has been that earlier archaeological departments at museums have been cut of from the rest of the museum organization. Instead of being run by a museum, contract archaeology is now run by companies. As a result museums have lost their connection to research-based knowledge production within archaeology, and contract archaeology has lost its link to the many skills a museum holds. 

  • 14.
    Isaksson, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Vessels of change: A long-term perspective on prehistoric pottery-use in southern and eastern middle Sweden based on lipid residue analyses.2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The analysis of lipid residues in prehistoric potter has quite recently become an integrated tool in Swedish archeology. As such it is an approach that has been adopted also in large rescue archaeology projects. This paper present an attempt to compile the results from two such projects and shows how this new knowledge have contributed to research archaeology especially in the form of new research projects. Suggestions for further future research is also suggested.

  • 15.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tangible Traces of Devotion: The Post-mortem Life of Relics2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 151-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though relics have attracted immense interest from a variety of scholars, not much attention has been paid to the practical handling of the holy corporal remains. Here, with the aim of better understanding the treatment of the bodies and relics as physical objects in Sweden during the Middle Ages, osseous materials from three different contexts were osteologically analysed. The investigation offers detailed insight into the treatment of the bones and makes it possible to distinguish three physical phases of the cult of relics. The three phases demonstrate the utilitarian administration of the bones and the fortitude of belief.

  • 16.
    Klevnäs, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Deaths matter2016In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 24, p. 49-56Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Källén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    A Plea for Critique2012In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 20, p. 61-66Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Källén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Jakobsson, Mikael
    A Hobbling Marriage: On the relationship between the collections and the societal mission of the Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm2009In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 17, p. 149-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 19th century, the new Museum of National Antiquities in Stockholm was a cutting-edge institution for the presentation of ideas of a universal human development from primitive to modern – ideas that were at the heart of the European colonial project. We argue that the archaeological collections with their unaltered 19th-century structures still represent a narrative that reproduces a colonial understanding of the world, a linear arrangement of essential cultural groups according to a teleological development model. Contrary to this, the contemporary mission of the Museum, inspired by the late 20th-century postcolonial thinking, is directed towards questioning this particular narrative. This problematic relationship is thus present deep within the structure of the Museum of National Antiquities as an institution, and it points to the need for long-term strategic changes to make the collections useful for vital museum activity in accordance with the Museum’s mission.

  • 19.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Response to comments: Archaeology vs. Archaeological Science2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, p. 49-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    von Hackwitz, Kim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Changing Scenery. Historicity in the area of Lake Hjälmaren, Sweden, c. 2800-2300 BC2008In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 15-16, p. 73-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    von Hackwitz, Kim. 2009. Current Swedish Archaeology, Vol 15-16 2007/2008, pp 73-89

    The article addresses changes in the archaeological record during the Middle Neolithic B in the area of Lake Hjälmaren. The main focus is on the difference between the Pitted Ware sites and the Boat-Axe sites with regard to choice of location. Traditionally the different distributions of these two assemblages have been understood as designating two different and more or less contemporaneous “cultures”. An alternative view to the conventional understanding is that the material cultures represent use and re-use activities associated with different spaces in the landscape. In the author’s opinion, the choices and activities that constitute these spaces should be understood as reflecting activities that took place in relation to a pre-existing landscape. In order to describe and analyse the relationship, the author applies theories of historicity and landmark, pointing towards an active social reproduction of a landscape.

1 - 21 of 21
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