Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Grossi, Giorgio
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Thomtén, Johanna
    Fandino-Losada, Andrés
    Soares, Joaquim
    Sundin, Örjan
    Does burnout predict changes in pain experiences among woman living ihn sweden? A longitudinal study2009In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, no 25, p. 297-311Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Hasson, Henna
    et al.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Nielsen, Karina
    Tafvelin, Susanne
    Are We All in the Same Boat?: The Role of Perceptual Distance in Organizational Health Interventions2016In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 294-303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates how agreement between leaders' and their team's perceptions influence intervention outcomes in a leadership-training intervention aimed at improving organizational learning. Agreement, i.e. perceptual distance was calculated for the organizational learning dimensions at baseline. Changes in the dimensions from pre-intervention to post-intervention were evaluated using polynomial regression analysis with response surface analysis. The general pattern of the results indicated that the organizational learning improved when leaders and their teams agreed on the level of organizational learning prior to the intervention. The improvement was greatest when the leader's and the team's perceptions at baseline were aligned and high rather than aligned and low. The least beneficial scenario was when the leader's perceptions were higher than the team's perceptions. These results give insights into the importance of comparing leaders' and their team's perceptions in intervention research. Polynomial regression analyses with response surface methodology allow three-dimensional examination of relationship between two predictor variables and an outcome. This contributes with knowledge on how combination of predictor variables may affect outcome and allows studies of potential non-linearity relating to the outcome. Future studies could use these methods in process evaluation of interventions.

  • 3. Løvseth, Lise Tevik
    et al.
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jónsdottir, Lilja Sigrun
    Marini, Massimo
    Linaker, Olav Morten
    Associations between Confidentiality Requirements, Support Seeking and Burnout among University Hospital Physicians in Norway, Sweden, Iceland and Italy (the HOUPE study)2013In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 432-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns about protecting patient's privacy are experienced as a limitation in the opportunity to obtain and utilize social support by many physicians. As resources of social support can modify the process of burnout, patient confidentiality may increase risk of this syndrome by interfering with proper stress adaptation. This study investigates if experiencing limitations in seeking social support due to confidentiality concerns are associated with burnout. University hospital physicians in four European countries completed measures of burnout, (Index) of Confidentiality as a Barrier for Support (ICBS), and factors of social resources and job demands. Linear regression analysis showed that ICBS was significantly associated with the burnout dimension of Exhaustion and not with Disengagement. These findings were present when controlling for factors known to diminish or increase the likelihood of burnout. These results are the first to demonstrate that patient confidentiality is associated with burnout in the process of stress management among physicians.

  • 4.
    Mellner, Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Krantz, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Lundberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Medically unexplained symptoms in women as related to physiological stress responses2005In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 45-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present, cross-sectional study explored whether self-reported symptoms are related to physiologicalstress indicators in a group of 43-year-old women representing the general populationin Sweden. Analyses were performed both on raw scores of physiological indicators and on a multisystemsummary index of allostatic load as a measure of cumulative biological burden. Participantsanswered a health questionnaire and underwent a medical examination including bloodpressure, heart rate measurements, determination of blood lipids and stress hormones. Urinaryepinephrine and norepinephrine were measured both on a working day and a work free day athome. In addition, salivary morning cortisol was measured on a non-work day. The physiologicalprofiles based on raw scores from 222 women showed that women with a high symptom loadhad significantly higher levels of cortisol (p < 0.05), and higher heart rate (p < 0.05) than didthose with a low symptom load. In contrast, women with a low symptom load had significantlyhigher levels of epinephrine on a work free day than did women with a high symptom load (p <0.05). No significant differences were found in norepinephrine responses. When analysing thesummary measure of allostatic load in relation to symptom prevalence no significant differencebetween the symptom groups emerged. One possible explanation for this result could be that amajority of the study population was healthy, reporting a low level of symptoms in general.However, the results support the notion that common, medically unexplained symptoms amongwomen are associated with certain biological parameters known to play a role in the developmentof ill health.

  • 5.
    Näswall, Katharina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Job insecurity as a predictor of physiological indicators of health in healthy working women: An extension of previous research2012In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 255-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity has been linked to different negative outcomes, such as negative work attitudes and health problems, with most studies including self-reported outcomes. Extending earlier research, the present study includes both selfreported and physiological indicators of health and sets out to investigate whether higher levels of job insecurity are related to higher levels of allostatic load, higher levels of morning cortisol, more physician-diagnosed symptoms of ill-health and poorer self-rated health. The study also investigated whether self-rated health mediated the relation between job insecurity and physiological outcomes. This was cross-sectionally studied in a cohort of Swedish women who participated in a large-scale longitudinal study focusing on life span development and adaptation. The results showed that job insecurity was related to self-rated health and morning cortisol, and, contrary to expectations, that job insecurity was unrelated to allostatic load and physician ratings, both directly and indirectly. The results indicate that, in healthy working women, job insecurity may be less detrimental to long-term physiological health than originally hypothesized.

  • 6. Reissner, Volker
    et al.
    Baune, Bernard
    Kokkevi, Anna
    Schifano, Fabrizo
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Palm, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Stohler, Rudolf
    DiFuria, Lucia
    Rehm, Jürgen
    Hölscher, Franz
    Schwarzer, Christine
    Scherbaum, Norbert
    Burnout, Coping and Job Satisfaction in Service Staff Treating Opioid Addicts-from Athens to Zurich2010In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 149-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Treatment-systems Research on European Addiction Treatment study (TREAT-project) is a longitudinal multicenter study on predominantly opioid-dependent patients and their health-care system in six European cities. As part of the examination of the drug services, this study evaluates level of burnout, coping strategies, perceived self-efficacy and job satisfaction among health-care workers treating opioid addicts. Employees were recruited from organizations in Athens, London, Padua, Stockholm, Zurich and Essen. The Maslach burnout inventory, Brief COPE, general self-efficacy questionnaire and a job satisfaction scale were filled in by about 383 drug service workers. One-third of the staff suffer from severe burnout. London and Stockholm colleagues are significantly more burdened than Zurich personnel where job satisfaction is highest. No cross-national differences could be detected concerning coping styles or level of perceived self-efficacy. Burnout is positively correlated to passive coping strategies and negatively linked to self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Males experience more depersonalization. Organizational features such as the entry-threshold level of the institution or out- vs. inpatient setting are relevant for coping strategies and job satisfaction. These and other findings are discussed in relation to preliminary data from the TREAT-project on characteristics of opioid addicted patients and other specific features of the drug treatment system.

  • 7.
    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lundmark, Robert
    Hasson, Henna
    The Dynamic Integrated Evaluation Model (DIEM): Achieving Sustainability in Organizational Intervention through a Participatory Evaluation Approach2016In: Stress and Health, ISSN 1532-3005, E-ISSN 1532-2998, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 285-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, there have been calls to develop ways of using a participatory approach when conducting interventions, including evaluating the process and context to improve and adapt the intervention as it evolves over time. The need to integrate interventions into daily organizational practices, thereby increasing the likelihood of successful implementation and sustainable changes, has also been highlighted. We propose an evaluation model—the Dynamic Integrated Evaluation Model (DIEM)—that takes this into consideration. In the model, evaluation is fitted into a co-created iterative intervention process, in which the intervention activities can be continuously adapted based on collected data. By explicitly integrating process and context factors, DIEM also considers the dynamic sustainability of the intervention over time. It emphasizes the practical value of these evaluations for organizations, as well as the importance of their rigorousness for research purposes.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf