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  • 1.
    Bergvall, Ulrika Alm
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology.
    Balogh, Alexandra C.V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology.
    Consummatory simultaneous positive and negative contrast in fallow deer: implications for selectivity2009In: Mammalian Biology, ISSN 1616-5047, E-ISSN 1618-1476, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 236-239Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ståhlberg, Sophie
    et al.
    University of Sassari, Italy.
    Bassi, Elena
    University of Sassari, Italy.
    Viviani, Viviana
    University of Sassari, Italy.
    Apollonio, Marco
    University of Sassari, Italy.
    Quantifying prey selection of Northern and Southern European wolves (Canis lupus)2017In: Mammalian Biology, ISSN 1616-5047, E-ISSN 1618-1476, Vol. 83, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wolf (Canis lupus) diet is determined by several ecological factors which can differ with latitude and human impact on the environment. Here we aim to compare Northern and Southern Europe with respect to wolf feeding habits. Scats were collected and analysed for nine years in South-central Scandinavia and four years in Tuscany, Italy, where prey density, predator-prey size relation and habitat heterogeneity, were compared in different ecological perspectives. Consumption followed prey density in Scandinavia but not in Tuscany and the main prey species, moose and wild boar respectively, were more seasonally age diversified in Scandinavia than in Tuscany. Most likely, the risk of injury was an important factor in prey age selection, especially in Tuscany. Diet composition in Scandinavia showed a negligible variance while in Tuscany, temporal and spatial variation were clearly recognised. The underlying mechanism is most likely related to the limited ecological diversity of landscape in Scandinavia contrasted with the higher variability of South European landscapes resulting in higher variation in prey abundance and consequently prey choice.

  • 3.
    Yom-Tov, Yoram
    et al.
    Department of Zoology,Tel Aviv University.
    Yom-Tov, Shlomith
    Department of Zoology,Tel Aviv University.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Body size of the weasel Mustela nivalis and the stoat M. erminea in Sweden.2010In: Mammalian Biology, ISSN 1616-5047, E-ISSN 1618-1476, Vol. 75, p. 420-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we examined temporal and geographical variations in a sample of 124 skulls of the weasel Mustela nivalis and 146 skulls oft hestoat M. erminea, collected in Sweden between 1959-1992 and 1913-1990, respectively. We used Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to combine the effects of latitude, longitude, year of collection, mean ambient temperature and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The first principal component (PC1) contained latitude, ambient temperature and NPP and was significantly and positively related to male (but not female) skull size of both stoats and weasels. None of the other factors or their interactions were significantly related to skull size. We conclude that ambient temperature, either directly through energy savings, or indirectly through improved food availability (increasedNPP), had a significant effect on determining body size of male stoats and weasels in Sweden. Our results support the hypothesis that male and female of these species are affected by different selection pressures and thus react differently to changing environmental conditions.

     

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