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  • 1.
    Allern, Sigurd
    et al.
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Pollack, Ester
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Journalism as a public good: A Scandinavian perspective2017In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The democratic importance of journalism is related to public good aspects of media products, as well as news media’s positive externalities. Journalism of high quality helps ensure we are all better informed and thus benefits democracy. Lack of investigative journalism may incur large social costs. However, journalism as a public good is difficult to fund on a commercial basis. Historically, an economic solution for media companies has been advertising subsidies, plus different types of public and private support. Today, the long-time marriage between news organisations and advertisers is severely weakened, and nothing so far suggests that digital revenues alone can finance a varied, broad and original news production. In the eyes of capitalist investors, news organisations represent the past, not the future. This article discusses, on the basis of Scandinavian media experiences and recent policy reforms, the necessity of a media policy and a funding system that acknowledges quality journalism as societal knowledge production and a public good.

  • 2.
    Andén-Papadopoulos, Kari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Pantti, Mervi
    Re-imagining crisis reporting: Professional ideology of journalists and citizen eyewitness images2013In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 960-977Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study, based on interviews with journalists representing major news organizations in Finland and Sweden, explores how the professional ideology of journalists is shaped by the international trend of citizen witnessing. Citizen-created photographs and videos that have become a routine feature of mainstream news coverage are approached as a potential force of change that transforms professional imaginaries of journalism vis-a-vis crisis events. From journalists' lines of thought three interpretative repertoires were identified: resistance, resignation and renewal. Our results hint at a rethinking of the professional norms and roles of journalists.

  • 3.
    Becker, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Gestures of Seeing: Amateur photographers in the news2015In: Journalism - Theory, Practice & Criticism, ISSN 1464-8849, E-ISSN 1741-3001, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 451-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the amateur photographer as a common figure in contemporary news photographs, focusing on how the amateur’s gestures signify in journalism’s coverage of media events. Drawing on theories of photography as performance and ritual, I argue that the presence of the non-professional in the news photograph destabilizes journalistic discourse by challenging the role of the professional photographer and by redefining the event and its meanings. This is especially critical in coverage of catastrophic events, when the amateur’s gestures become a form of witnessing from a participant’s perspective, carrying both private and collective meanings for how the event will be understood in the future, and undermining the authority of journalism.

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