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  • 1.
    Adler, Aleksandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Perifera kulturer i kontakt?: Indirekt översättning av hebreisk skönlitteratur till svenska2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following product–oriented study deals with translational norms operating in indirect translation of Hebrew literature into Swedish. The research was conducted as a contrastive study of Extra–linguistic Cultural References (ECR) based on Toury’s (1995/2012) coupled pairs and supplemented with Pedersen’s typology (2011). The material consisted of 3 x 136 coupled pairs excerpted from a collection of short stories written by an Israeli high–prestige writer Amos Oz and translated into Swedish through English. Both translations were carried out by high–prestige translators. The results suggest that indirect literary translation follows the adequacy norm in accordance with the hypothesis on high–prestige translation (Lindqvist 2002). The hypothesis on acceptancy norms operating in indirect translation is rejected. 

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tolkutbildning i Sverige: Ett kritiskt vägval2016Report (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Aronsson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    I dialog med tid och rum: Anföring, interpunktion och interjektioner i en kommenterad översättning av Yasutaka Tsutsuis ungdomsroman 時をかける少女 (Toki wo kakeru shoujo)2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis consists of a translation from Japanese to Swedish of Yasutaka Tsutsui’s Toki wo kakeru shoujo (The girl who leapt through time), and a commentary of the translation process. The purpose is to examine which problems may arise when translating reported discourse, punctuation and interjections, and what strategies can be used to solve these problems. The translation is performed with an orientation towards acceptability and the target culture, to try and conform the text to the norms and expectations of the target culture.

  • 4.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    How do you do it anyway?: A Longitudinal Study of three Translator Students Translating from Russian into Swedish2009 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - albanska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Azbel Schmidt, Morena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ordlista för tolkar: Svenska - kurdiska2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Bendegard, Saga
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Melander Marttala, UllaWestman, MariaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Språk och norm: Rapport från ASLA:s symposium, Uppsala universitet 21−22 april 20162017Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Benediktsdottir, Ásdis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Analysing a Harvest Moon: On the translation of role language in Bokujō Monogatari: Hajimari no Daichi for the Nintendo 3DS2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis seeks to introduce the concept of role language in translation in the context of video game localisation. There is very little written on the subject of role language in translation from Japanese to English, and none which pertains to role language in video games. There is also a seeming deficiency of reliable literature regarding the product of translation in video game localisation, analysing what was done and what effects it may have had on the finished product. By analysing the particular role language profiles of selected characters from Bokujō Monogatari: Hajimari no Daichi for the Nintendo 3DS, this thesis hopes to serve as a stepping stone towards a new area of video game localisation.

    Eight non-playable characters, four male and four female, were analysed to create their respective role language profiles. Four scenarios were chosen for each character: the first and last heart event, the love confession and the married life sequence. The translations of each of these scenarios were analysed, along with how the respective characters were linguistically portrayed.

    The study found that although many characters were found to retain most of their original linguistic profiling in translation, there were instances where misconception of the source text could have been a factor. The translations where this rather than a different linguistic profile altered the character’s perception, the translations were often ST-oriented. In translations where the characterisation had been unaltered, predominantly it seemed the result of a critical distance from the ST and willingness on the translator’s part to take creative liberties.

    Role language is an integral feature of Japanese popular fiction, and it would seem that the fictional realms of video games are no exception. Although this thesis has studied only a limited sample, it would not be entirely out of line to draw the initial conclusion that to take a step back from the source material and instead focus on conveying a perception of a character rather than follow the written script, seems to result in a character portrayal in the target text similar to that in the source text.

  • 9.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Johansson, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Sannholm, Raphael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Fasta regler för fri kommunikation2017In: Nio-fem: tidskrift om arbetsliv & profession, ISSN 2001-9688, no 2, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I dag jobbar många hemma eller på resande fot, och allt färre har ett fast skrivbord. Hur påverkar det förutsättningarna för kommunikationen? Hur ser kommunikationen ut jämfört med arbetsplatser där man fortfarande har eget skrivbord? I den här artikeln tar några språkvetenskapliga forskare från Stockholms universitet upp aktuella fynd från olika forskningsprojekt om kommunikation i arbetslivet.

  • 10.
    Borking, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Donaldson på Hellsingska: en komparativ fallstudie: Julia Donaldsons engelska bilderböcker i svensk översättning av Lennart Hellsing2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This master’s thesis looks at the translation of Julia Donaldson’s English picture books into Swedish by the Swedish children’s author Lennart Hellsing. The main aim of the study is to determine whether the translation of the original (source) texts involves the transference of Hellsing’s writing style into the translated (target) texts. Earlier research, carried out by Kåreland (2002), is employed in order to pinpoint Hellsing’s distinctive style as a writer. The style variables apparent in Hellsing’s own writing were thereby identified and these are applied to the analysed target texts in this case study. The theoretical framework is based on descriptive translation studies (DTS) and the use of Toury’s model (1995) for reconstructing translational norms allows the source texts (ST) and target texts (TT) to be put into a sociocultural context. By working within this framework a descriptive analysis is used to describe and compare the ST and TT and the concept of translation as a practice governed by certain translational norms at a certain moment in time and within a certain culture is applied. The findings show that Hellsing’s style as a writer can also be detected in his translations of Donaldson’s picture books. The results of this case study also indicate that the translation of these texts can be considered to be a target culture oriented practice.  

  • 11.
    Bysell, Lina Emilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    En revolutionerande översättning: En översättningsteoretisk uppsats om att översätta en skildring av det ryska inbördeskriget2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay covers the translation of a fictional prose text from Russian to Swedish, the source text being the first chapter of Aleksey Tolstoy’s Chmuroe utro (Bleak Morning), the third part of his trilogy Choždenie po mukam (The Ordeal). A commentary of this translation is provided, where the linguistic abstractions encountered throughout the process are documented.

    My methodology attempts to emulate that of Eugene Nida and his principle of “Dynamic Equivalence”. This procedure is addressed in the commentary, as I explain how utilisation of Nida's theories can assist in overcoming the numerous peculiarities inherent to translation.

    I also deal with the issue regarding the first two books of the trilogy, which have already been translated into Swedish by another translator. In my work, I explain how and why I have chosen to relate to the earlier translation. 

  • 12.
    Damberg, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Den magiska kritan: En kommenterad översättning från japanska till svenska av Abe Kōbōs novell 魔法のチョーク (Mahou no chooku).2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay consists of a translation from Japanese to Swedish of the short story The Magic Chalk (魔法のチョーク) by Abe Kōbō and an accompanying commentary focusing on three categories of words or expressions that might pose a problem to translators of Japanese. These categories are cultural specific concepts, onomatopoeia and western loanwords.

    Since Abe Kōbō is an award-winning, internationally acclaimed author and the norm when translating such authors is to be source text oriented, I have chosen to translate using a adequacy-oriented strategy. In other words, I have tried to keep the original author's style and stay true to the source text as much as possible without making the target text sound unnatural. 

  • 13.
    Damberg, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Returning Loanwords: Translation of Western Loanwords in Japanese to English2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Although the similarities between the English language and the Japanese language are few, the two have influenced each other profoundly in the last century. The category of words called gairaigo in the Japanese language mostly consist of loanwords from Western languages – in particular English. But what happens when translators translate these originally English words in Japanese back to English? This thesis sought to examine what kind of local strategies Japanese-to-English translators use when translating gairaigo, if these strategies vary depending on the text type and whether or not there is a correlation between the local strategies and the word class of the gairaigo. Three different kinds of texts were examined; a novel, several newspaper articles and an operation manual. By comparing the source texts with their corresponding target texts, it was possible to determine six different local strategies used to translate gairaigo – omission, returning, transposition, modulation, equivalence and paraphrase.

  • 14.
    Dankis, Sofia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Subtitling the Internet: An investigation into subtitles for dynamic media2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis will examine interlingual subtitles for online media. The research takes place within the descriptive translation studies paradigm. The source material consists of subtitles for a selection of webcasts found on the video sharing platform YouTube. The analysis will examine how the original dialogue has been translated as well as the form that the subtitles are presented in. An analysis of norm governed subtitles for television programs that follow established subtitling norms will also be made for comparison. Online media and broadcast media are divided into a dynamic and static category respectively in order to treat webcasts as an individual form of media. Dynamic media is defined as digital media created for the Internet, and static media is defined as media created for televised broadcasts. The results do not include qualitative assessments but have shown that subtitles for webcasts do not follow subtitling norms and display a wide range of unconventional approaches. The determining factor that illustrates the nature of webcast subtitles is attributed the diverse group of people writing them. 

  • 15. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Hubscher-Davidson, Severine
    Introduction to the special issue2014In: Translation and Interpreting Studies, ISSN 1932-2798, E-ISSN 1876-2700, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An introduction is presented in which the editor discusses various reports within the issue on topics including role of cultural knowledge in the translation process, translation performance and metaphoricity.

  • 16. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, BirgittaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Hubscher-Davidson, Séverine
    The Development of Professional Competence2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 17. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, BirgittaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Hubscher-Davidson, SéverineNorberg, UlfStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Describing cognitive processes in translation: acts and events2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 18. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, BirgittaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Hubscher-Davidson, SéverineNorberg, UlfStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Describing Cognitive Processes in Translation: Acts and events: Special issue of Translation and Interpreting Studies 8:2 (2013)2013Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
  • 19. Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    et al.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Hubscher-Davidson, Séverine
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Introduction: Describing cognitive processes in translation: Acts and events2013In: Translation and Interpreting Studies, ISSN 1932-2798, E-ISSN 1876-2700, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 151-153Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Auktoriserad translator - kompetens och prov: Kartläggning och kunskapsunderlag2015Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Emil i Lönneberga i nya ryska kläder: Intention, variation och reception2016In: Sinhronija, diahronija, tekstologija. Sbornik naučnyh stat’ej i perevodov / [ed] E. B Krylova, T. A. Mihajlova, E. R Skvajrs, E. L. Žil’cova, I. V. Matycina, Moskva: Maks Press , 2016, p. 355-362Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper deals with dialect in translation of children’s literature, analyzing translations into Russian of Swedish author Astrid Lindgren’s book Emil in Lönneberga. Three types of data are analyzed: a) 20 different translations into Russian (2 published, 18 done by Russian university students of Swedish), b) students’ commentaries to their translations, and c) a focus group discussion (6 Russian university students of Swedish) of the different solutions. The data shows a wide variety of different types of solutions. The use of morphosyntactic means has in this study the character of a translation norm (Toury 1995): it is most frequently found, it is used in both published versions, and it is received most positively by the readers. Other types of solutions are less frequent and have a more idiosyncratic character. A comparison between the translation commentaries and the discussion with the readers shows that readers’ reception does not always correspond to the translator’s intention. 

  • 22.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Lexikala val som ett drag i översättarstil. En studie av två bulgariska noveller i svensk översättning2013In: Översättning, stil och lingvistiska metoder / [ed] Bladh, Elisabeth & Ängsal, Magnus P., Göteborg: Institutionen för språk och litteratur, Göteborgs universitet , 2013, p. 55-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lexical choice as an element of translator style. A study of the Swedish translations of two Bulgarian short stories

    The general topic of the paper is translator style, tentatively defined as consistent linguistic patterns in target texts produced by a given translator. Translator style can be studied from two different analytic perspectives, either in relation to the source text or in relation to other texts written in the target language. The research question of the paper is whether patterns in lexical choice, especially explicitations and specifications in relation to the source text, can be part of the study of translator style. An analysis of the Swedish versions of two short stories by the Bulgarian writer Yordan Radichkov indicates that one of the two translators has a marked invidual profile as regards lexical choices. It it concluded that this type of analysis is suitable for further study.

  • 23.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Till punkt och pricka? Översättarstil, normer och interpunktion vid översättning från bulgariska till svenska2014In: Slovo : Journal of Slavic Languages and Literatures, ISSN 0348-744X, E-ISSN 2001-7359, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 77-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mark my words? Translator style, norms and punctuation in translation from Bulgarian to Swedish.  During the 1970's and 1980's, a relatively large number of Bulgarian works of fiction were translated into Swedish. Several translators and publishers were involved in this activity, which also included indirect translation via English. Drawing on Descriptive Translation Studies and theories of translation norms (Toury 1995), this paper analyses punctuation in the renditions of direct speech by different translators and identifies individual translator styles. These findings are discussed in relation to the characteristics of the various publishing houses and their position in the sociocultural context. 

  • 24.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Översättarutbildningar i Sverige2013In: Från ett språk till ett annat: Om översättning och tolkning / [ed] Språkrådet, Stockholm: Norstedts Förlag, 2013, p. 66-70Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    Cognitive space: Exploring the situational interface2016In: Translation Spaces, ISSN 2211-3711, E-ISSN 2211-372X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Ehrensberger-Dow, Maureen
    Zurich university of applied sciences, Switzerland.
    Hubscher-Davidson, Séverine
    Aston university, UK.
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Introduction2015In: Describing cognitive processes in translation: Acts and Events / [ed] Maureen Ehrensberger-Dow, Birgitta Englund Dimitrova, Séverine Hubscher-Davidson, Ulf Norberg, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 1-5Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Cognitive aspects of community interpreting. Toward a process model2016In: Reembedding Translation Process Research / [ed] Ricardo Muñoz Martín, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2016, p. 195-214Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses cognitive aspects of professional community interpreting. We give an overview of earlier research into community interpreting, arguing that cognitive aspects have largely been neglected. We propose that in building a model of the mental processes of the community interpreter, different kinds of monitoring are a crucial and pervasive component. Monitoring contributes to and enables the double function of the interpreter: translating and managing the interaction of the interpreted encounter. We furthermore stress the importance of the notion of professional self-concept for explaining the interpreter’s decision-making and exemplify this by analyzing turn-taking in two Swedish-Spanish interpreted encounters.

  • 28.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Retrospection in interpreting and translation: explaining the process?2014In: Monografías de Traducción e Interpretación MonTi Special Issue (ed. R. Muñoz Martín), ISSN 1889-4178, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 177-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For studying the processes involved in translation and in interpreting, retrospection is one of the few research methods equally suitable for both areas. At the first workshop on research methods in process-oriented research, in Graz in 2009, we presented the results of a pilot study of retrospection as a research method, published as Englund Dimitrova and Tiselius (2009). The study involved data from two groups (15 years of professional experience vs. no professional experience), each with 3+3 subjects (interpreter subjects vs. translator subjects, all with Swedish as their L1). The source text was a 10-minute plenary speech in English from the European Parliament, interpreted simultaneously into Swedish. For the translation data, the translator subjects translated the original European Parliament transcript of the speech, 1,093 words, writing in Translog. After the task, subjects did immediate retrospection. The first analysis of the data indicated that a challenge when using retrospection is that subjects tend to report having forgotten about some of their processes.

     

    In this paper we report an analysis of the process data in relation to the retrospective protocols. Our focus is on reported problems and the occurrences of problem indicators in the process. It was found that most reported problems are confirmed by the presence of problem indicators in the process. However, the majority of problem indicators found in the process do not correspond to any reported problem. Hence, the subjects’ problem reports can only explain a limited number of the potential problems in the process. The need for further research into retrospection as a research method in Translation Studies is pointed out.

  • 29.
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    On Common Ground? The Swedish Experience with University Education of Interpreter Teachers2013In: Training the Trainers: Nordic Seminar on InterpreterEducation: Utbildningen av utbildare: Nordiskt möte om tolkutbildning / [ed] Cecilia Wadensjö, Stockholm: Tolk- och översättarinstitutet, Stockholms universitet , 2013, p. 67-83Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on participants’ experiences with a university-level course for teachers of interpreting, given three times at Stockholm University, Sweden. An important purpose of the course was to provide a collaborative learning environment and to support and promote a feeling of common ground between educators working within various branches of interpreting. Drawing primarily upon a focus group interview and on students’ written evaluations, we have indications that the course did promote a sense of similarity between students across traditional borders. Also, an interesting difference between spoken-language interpreting educators and sign-language interpreting educators emerged. Educators with experiences from the first category of courses seemed to be much oriented towards preparing the students for a final exam, similar to the national certification test (basically, a teacher assessed proficiency test), whereas those working in sign-language- interpreting courses seemed to be more oriented to more frequent and other types of assessments of student performance (self-, peer and teacher assessments). Finally, the course seems to have provided a network for informal collaboration between interpreter educators that stayed intact over time.

  • 30.
    Engström, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Från Mister Yummy till Herr Mums: Översättning med kommentar: bildspråk i en novell av Stephen King2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study deals with the translation of a short story written by Stephen King. Prerequisites for the selected translation principle were polysystem theory, descriptive translation studies, intended audience, and the result of a style analysis of the source text in which an abundance of imagery was clear. An analysis of the imagery in the target text found that a predominantly adequacy-oriented translation strategy was used and that Stephen King's status in the target culture can be viewed as high rather than low. Problems during the translation process were mainly associated with the translation of imagery.

  • 31. Gossas, Carina
    et al.
    Axelsson, Marcus
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Van Meerbergen, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    En katts resa: Pettson och Findus på norska, tyska, nederlänska, franska och spanska2015In: Översättning för en ny generation: Nordisk barn- och ungdomslitteratur på export / [ed] Valérie Alfvén, Hugues Engel, Charlotte Lindgren, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2015, p. 61-71Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I den här studien jämförs översättningar av två av Sven Nordqvists bilderböcker om gubben Pettson och katten Findus till tre germanska språk (norska, tyska, nederländska) och två latinska språk (franska och spanska). Syftet med studien är att undersöka vilka tendenser i översättningspraktiken som varit gällande i fem olika språkområden med olika kulturellt och språkligt avstånd från det svenska originalet. I studien diskuteras utgivningsstatistik, måltexternas yttre utformning och dessutom görs en analys av översättning av namn samt uttryck för ljud och rörelse. Studien visar att de germanskspråkiga översättningarna är mer källtextnära än de romanskspråkiga och att de franska är de som avlägsnar sig längst från källtexten.

  • 32.
    Gossas, Carina
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Norberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Translating non-standard forms of reported discourse in children’s books: Den tredje grottans hemlighet by Swedish author P. O. Enquist in French and German as a case in point2014In: Trans Revista de traductología, ISSN 1137-2311, no 18, p. 85-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The imitation of character voices and the relationship between narrator and characters are known to be fruitful domains for authors’ creativity and expressivity and thus constitute an intriguing translation problem that lacks clear solutions. In this study, we examine the translating of non-standard forms of reported discourse as distinct representations of voices in the French and German translations of the second children’s book by the Swedish author P.O. Enquist Den tredje grottans hemlighet, 2010 ("The Secret of the Third Cave"). We set out to analyze the translations of two stylistic features of this text: the use of hybrid forms of direct and indirect speech and the use of italics to mark a cited discourse.

  • 33. Granhagen Jungner, Johanna
    et al.
    Tiselius, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Lützén, Kim
    Blomgren, Klas
    Pergert, Pernilla
    Creating a Meeting Point of Understanding: Interpreters' Experiences in Swedish Childhood Cancer Care2016In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 137-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Children and families with a foreign background and limited Swedish proficiency have to communicate through interpreters in childhood cancer care centers in Sweden. Interpreter-mediated events deal with many difficulties that potentially hinder the transfer of information. The purpose of our study was to explore interpreters' experiences of interpreting between health care staff and limited Swedish proficiency patients/families in childhood cancer care.

    DESIGN: Using purposive samples, we interviewed 11 interpreters individually. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS: Analyses of the data resulted in the main theme of creating a meeting point of understanding, constructed from 3 subthemes: balancing between cultures, bridging the gaps of knowledge, and balancing between compassion and professionalism.

    DISCUSSION: Our result shows that in order to create a sustainable meeting point of understanding, it is necessary to explain both the context and cultural differences. These results suggest that the responsibility for information transfer lies with both the health care profession and the interpreters. Tools have to be developed for both parties to contribute to creating the meeting point of understanding.

  • 34.
    Grenbäck, Helen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    En skola med två språk: Elevers upplevelse av tvåspråkig tolkad undervisning i specialskolan2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines pupils who use sign language and their experience of bilingual education where there are instances of interpreted interaction. This is a qualitative study in which a total of 14 pupils from two different schools for the Deaf have participated in semi-structured group interviews. The results shows that teachers, assistants and pupils interpret in the school. Trained interpreters are rarely used in the education. Another thing that emerges is that the results between the schools differ; at one school, pupils are satisfied and believe that teachers’ have good language skills, at the other, pupils are less satisfied and believe that teachers’ language skills lack. In addition, the pupils believe that it is beneficial when a teacher interpret, because they know the teacher, but emphasize that it often results in information loss. The pupils consider trained interpreters to be a quality assurance. Furthermore, the results show that the majority of pupils are critical of that the school for the Deaf should have need for interpreted teaching, because the teachers would instead have sufficient language skills. A conclusion has been reached that it is inappropriate that pupils have interpreted their own teaching and that it is something that should not occur, and that it would be of interest with more complementary studies in the area, e.g. a comparative analysis of the school for the Deaf and another bilingual school to see if interpreting occurs at that school.

  • 35.
    Hagander, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Surf and turf, builder’s mug och Jaffa cakes: Översättningsstrategier vid svensk undertextning av kulturspecifika referenser i anglofona matlagningsprogram2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Food, language and culture are closely linked and cooking shows are peppered with culturally specific references. Culturally specific references are defined as “any reference to a cultural entity which, due to its distance from the target culture, is characterized by a sufficient degree of opacity for the target reader to constitute a problem” (Mailhac in Ranzato 2015:54) and can be things such as measurements (pints), brands (Tabasco), and dishes (surf and turf) to name a few. This study focuses on the translation of culture specific references in cooking shows. Since most of the cooking shows translated into Swedish are in English, the material for this study consists of 21 cooking shows in English and their Swedish translations. This study will look at the shows 3 good things, Save with Jamie, David Rocco’s Dolce Vita, Kitchen Hero and The Great British Bake off. By constructing a corpus and analyzing the culturally specific references, the norms regarding translation strategies for the translation of culturally specific references in cooking shows have been mapped out, and compared to the results of a well known study on primetime TV by Pedersen (2011). These were categorized in accordance with Pedersen’s taxonomy (2011:76). The results showed that the norms were very similar to those of primetime TV, with the exception of some domain-specific norms. Language influences how we see the world. Thus, the way culturally specific references are translated from one culture into another is important because it affects how cultures are viewed and interpreted, at least within the food community. 

  • 36.
    Hassel Borowski, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Det tredje språket: Tolkspråk och normalisering i teckenspråkstolkning2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay is concerned with the subject of interpretese – the idea that interpreted language differs from non-interpreted language. Within translation studies, the corresponding term is translationese, and this essay draws upon much of the research in this field, as it is more developed. One particular area of research into translationese revolves around so called translation universals, or universal features of translation. They could be described as rules or laws that define translated language. One of those universals is called normalisation. This essay seeks to answer if normalisation also exists in Sign Language interpreting, with reference to exaggeration of typical target language patterns. Two comparable corpora were used, Swedish Sign Language Corpus (SSLC) with non-interpreted Sign Language texts, and Korpus för simultantolkade teckenspråkstexter (KST) with interpreted Sign Language texts. The typical target language pattern that was chosen for the investigation is the Swedish sign KOPPLA. Instances of the sign were investigated in both corpora, to spot any exaggeration in KST. The results show that KOPPLA is in fact overrepresented in KST, but that one should be careful to generalize, as several limiting factors were at play.

  • 37. Holsanova, Jana
    et al.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Syntolkning: forskning, tankar och visioner2016In: Syntolkning: forskning och praktik / [ed] Jana Holsanova, Cecilia Wadensjö, Mats Andrén, Stockholm: Myndigheten för tillgängliga medier MTM , 2016, p. 13-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38. Holsanova, Jana
    et al.
    Wadensjö, CeciliaStockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.Andrén, Mats
    Syntolkning: forskning och praktik2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What is audio description? Why is it important to provide audio description? What is being done to develop audio description in Sweden today? What does access to audio description mean for people with blindness and visual impairment? How can research in various fields contribute to the development of audio description? What can audio description teach us about human thinking, perception and narration? Audio description (AD) is a phenomenon that has grown in scope in recent years. It affects a large part of the population, but is still relatively unknown to the wider public. The joint purpose of the contributions in this book is to change that. Included are con-tributions from researchers, educators, persons with visual impairment and blindness, practitioners of AD and government representatives who write about audio description from their various perspectives. AD is a subject area for researchers within Cognitive Science with inquiries as: Can people who have never seen see things in their mind’s eye and create mental images? How can this happen? What is the relationship between language, thought and storytelling? AD is also an issue of interest within the field of Translation Studies with questions of: How can interpreters convey in spoken words what film makers, actors, and so forth convey by means of visible communicative resources, like images, movement light, gestures and facial expressions? Audio descrip-tion also deals with questions pertaining to aspects of quality: How do users of audio description services think that AD can be improved? What training is available for those who wish to study audio description? What are the experiences in regards to AD from other countries? In Spain, in particular, AD research has been pursued for a longer time than in Sweden.

  • 39. Hurtado Albir, Amparo
    et al.
    Alves, Fabio
    Englund Dimitrova, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Lacruz, Isabel
    A retrospective and prospective view of translation research from an empirical, experimental, and cognitive perspective: the TREC network2015In: Translation & Interpreting, ISSN 1836-9324, E-ISSN 1836-9324, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 5-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to discuss some developments in empirical translation research with an experimental and cognitive perspective. The focus is on the activities and research of the network TREC (Translation, Research, Empiricism, Cognition). The network was formed in 2011, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness and led by PACTE (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona). It consists of translation scholars and research groups united by their common interest in empirical and experimental research, particularly in relation to the cognitive operations that underlie the task of translating.

    The paper first gives a short general overview of research on translation as a cognitive activity and outlines the objectives of the TREC network. The network members, representing universities from Argentina, Brazil, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the USA, then present their most important contributions to cognitively oriented research (topics, methods, results). Finally, some conclusions are drawn and perspectives for future research are outlined.

  • 40.
    Hägglund, Elisabet
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Kandidatuppsats i tolkning: Tolkning av svåra samtal i vården2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Community interpreters working in health care often face difficult situations (Baistow2000 described in Valero-Garcés 2005). Interpreters working with refugees often themselves havebeen refugees and when they interpret stories about trauma this might remind them of their own pasttrauma (Lor 2012:17-18). Having to give bad news to a patient can also be painful to the interpreter(Butow 2012:238). In spite of the fact that interpreters have a stressful task, they seldom getappropriate support and guidance in their work (Butow 2012:240).Method: This study is made up of a survey with 27 interpreters undertaking further training. Theyhave been asked questions about to what extent they are exposed to stressful situations, how much thisaffects them and what support they get and what they consider would be needed to improve theirworking conditions.Results: Many interpreters are strongly affected from having to tell the patients bad news and frominterpreting traumatic experiences. The interpreters seldom receive support in their work and theythink they, as well as the health care staff, need more training.Conclusions: Working conditions for the interpreters are demanding and they need more support, butalso the health care staff need more training in how to work with interpreters. There is a need forlarger and deeper studies to decide what has to be done to improve the working conditions for theinterpreters and the quality of the interpretations.

  • 41.
    Högström, Ebba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Att göra det omöjliga: Poesiöversättning som litterär och social praktik2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 42.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Care identities and interpreting practices2015In: Språk och identitet: rapport från ASLA:s symposium, Södertörns högskola 8–9 maj 2014 / [ed] Linda Kahlin, Mats Landqvist, Ingela Tykesson, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola , 2015, p. 59-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Creating Opportunities for Residents to Engage in Social Exchange: Brokering in Multilingual Residential Care Settings2017In: Multilingual interaction and dementia / [ed] Charlotta Plejert, Camilla Lindholm, Robert W. Schrauf, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 103-132Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, by analysing brokering as a set of interactional practices, we  demonstrate how participants – residents and caregivers – who do not share a language are brokered into mutual interaction. Three different settings: a ‘how-are-you’ sequence, a singing and dancing activity, and a recreational activity with the use of a photo are analysed. The excerpts illustrate the challenges as well as the potentials of caregivers’ brokering practices. As our analyses attest, in a linguistically and culturally complex care context involving persons who do not share a common language, brokering can be organised not in a single way, but variously and with different interactional outcomes.

  • 44.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Language brokering in multilingual caregiving settings2016In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 277-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using the methodology of conversation analysis to examine audio-recorded multi-party conversations between a Swedish-/Farsi-speaking resident and multilingual staff in a Swedish residential home, this article describes a practice for establishing shared understanding by one caregiver enacting the role of language broker. The focus is on caregiving settings where caregivers assist an elderly person with her personal hygiene. We demonstrate how brokering is used to (1) maintain the conversational flow in a small talk sequence and (2) address the contents in the resident’s complaints. The article thus advances our understanding of language brokering as an activity that multilingual staff in a linguistically asymmetrical workplace setting take on to assist a colleague in performing client-oriented activities.

  • 45.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Vårdelever om flerspråkighet på arbetsplatsen2017In: Språk och norm: Rapport från ASLA:s symposium, Uppsala universitet, 21-21 april 2016 / [ed] Saga Bendegard, Ulla Melander Martala, Maria Westman, Association suédoise de linguistique appliquée, ASLA , 2017, p. 45-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wadensjö, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Managing complaints in multilingual care encounters2017In: Multilingua - Journal of Cross-cultural and Interlanguage Communiciation, ISSN 0167-8507, E-ISSN 1613-3684, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 313-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Troubles-telling and complaints are common in contexts of care for older people and need to be managed by care staff in a respectful manner. This paper examines the handling of an older person’s complaints in multilingual care encounters that involve participants who do not share a common language. The data consist of video-recordings and ethnographic fieldwork in a residential home for older people in Sweden that is characterised by a variety of languages and backgrounds. The findings are based on analyses of multi-party interactions involving an Arabic-speaking resident and caregivers with different levels of knowledge in different languages. We focus on complaint sequences when the resident expresses a negative stance (displeasure, anger, etc.) towards some difficult circumstance. Using the methodology of conversation analysis, we analyse the affect-regulating work through which the caregivers attempt to turn a pressing situation into a moment of cheerfulness and intimacy. The analyses bring to light the multilingual practices that the caregivers draw upon in pursuing this work, such as translating and giving voice to the resident’s complaining.

  • 47.
    Johansson, Lina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Vem i hela världen säger så?: Normer vid översättning av könskodad dialog i manga2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay investigates norms in translation of gender stereotype language. Gender Studies has for many years claimed that gender stereotypes in language not only maintain gender stereotypes but also reinforce them. Because of this feminist translation theorists stress the importance of being aware of what stereotypes translation can and do transfer between cultures. In this essay the gender stereotypes that are dealt with are the ones of characters in Japanese comics, so called manga. With a methodology from Translations Studies, coupled pairs, it compares Japanese source texts with Swedish target texts. The results shows that almost all of the gender stereotype language in the source texts has been omitted in the target texts. Even though this makes the language less stereotype, it does not make all of the characters less stereotype. One character is even more stereotype in the target text than in the source text. This probably shows that the omissions are not a choice made by the translator to reduce stereotypes. The reason for the omissions seems instead to be that it is a norm in translation of manga to omit a certain amount of the character specific language.

  • 48.
    Larsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Så sjung, bara sjung!: initiala och operationella normer i sångboksöversättningar av Astrid Lindgrens visor via multimodal analys av text, bild och musik.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyse which initial and operational norms that were used in the German translation of pages from a songbook written by Astrid Lindgren. The models that are used are taken from Franzon (2009), Franzon (2016) and van Meerbergen (2010). The research questions concern musical rhythm, rhetorical methods within the text, the interaction level between images and text and the reader. The purpose is also to see how active or passive the main characters in the books are portrayed. The results show that translations of describing songs with long verses tend to become shorter and very changed compared to translations of songs with short verses and with a less describing nature. The interaction level with the reader is mostly low in both source and target texts and images. The main characters are also more active in the German translations than in the Swedish originals.  

  • 49.
    Larsson, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Det är typ en rolig historia: Översättning av en amerikansk ungdomsbok med kommentar2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines the discrepancies and differences that occur when translating an American youth novel into Swedish. The novel in question is It’s Kind of a Funny Story (2006) by Ned Vizzini. The theories used for analysis are based on previous research from, among other, Toury and his terms acceptability and adequacy, and the strategies used during the translation were presented by Vinay and Darbelnet.

  • 50. Lemhagen, Gunnar
    et al.
    Almqvist, Ingrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Institute for Interpreting and Translation Studies.
    Tolk- och översättarinstitutet: En särskild inrättning 1986-20122013Book (Other academic)
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