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  • 1.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption in very old age and its association with survival: A matter of health and physical function2016In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 159, 240-245 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol consumption in very old age is increasing; yet, little is known about the personal and health-related characteristics associated with different levels of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and survival among the oldest old. Methods: Nationally representative data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD, ages 76-101; n=863) collected in 2010/2011 were used. Mortality was analyzed unti12014. Alcohol consumption was measured with questions about frequency and amount. Drinks per month were calculated and categorized as abstainer, light-to-moderate drinker (0.5-30 drinks/month) and heavy drinker (>30 drinks/month). Multinomial logistic regressions and Laplace regressions were performed. Results: Compared to light-to-moderate drinkers, abstainers had lower levels of education and more functional health problems, while heavy drinkers were more often men, had higher levels of education, and no serious health or functional problems. In models adjusted only for age and sex, abstainers died earlier than drinkers. Among light-to-moderate drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with longer survival, while among heavy drinkers, each additional drink/month was associated with shorter survival. However, after adjusting for personal and health-related factors, estimates were lower and no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: The association between alcohol consumption and survival in very old age seems to have an inverse J-shape; abstention and heavy use is associated with shorter survival compared to light-to moderate drinking. To a large extent, differences in survival are due to differences in baseline health and physical function.

  • 2.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Shaw, Benjamin
    Trajectories of social activities from middle age to old age and late-life disability: a 36-year follow-up2013In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 42, no 6, 790-793 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: to examine the association between 34-year trajectories of social activity, from middle age to old age and late-life disability.                  

    Methods: data from the Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) were used. LNU data from 1968, 1981, 1991 and 2000 were merged with SWEOLD data from 1992, 2002 and 2004 to create a longitudinal data set  with five observation periods. Trajectories of social activities covered 1968–2002, and late-life disability was measured  in 2004. The sample consisted of 729 individuals aged 33–61 at baseline (1968), who participated in at least four observation periods and who were free from mobility limitations at baseline. Four trajectories of social activity were identified and used as predictors of late-life disability.                  

    Results: reporting low/medium levels of social activity from mid-life to old age was the most common trajectory group. Persons reporting continuously low/medium or decreasing levels of social activity had higher odds ratios for late-life disability (OR = 2.33 and OR = 2.15, respectively) compared with those having continuously high levels of activity, even when adjusting for age, sex and mobility limitations, and excluding persons with baseline mobility limitations.                  

    Conclusions: results suggest that the disability risk associated with social activities is related to recent levels of activity, but also that risk may accumulate over time, as indicated by the higher disability risk associated with the continuously low/medium level social activity trajectory.

  • 3.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Shaw, Benjamin A.
    Smoking trajectories from midlife to old age and the development of non-life-threatening health problems: A 34-year prospective cohort study2013In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 57, no 2, 107-112 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To examine how trajectories of smoking observed over a 34-year period, were associated with the progression of mobility impairment, musculoskeletal pain, and symptoms of psychological distress from midlife to old age. Method. The Swedish Level of Living Survey (LNU) and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) were merged to create a nationally representative longitudinal sample of Swedish adults (aged 30-50 at baseline; n = 1060), with four observation periods, from 1968 through 2002. Five discrete smoking trajectory groups were treated as predictors of variation in health trajectories using multilevel regression. Results. At baseline, there were no differences in mobility impairment between smoking trajectory groups. Over time all smokers, particularly persistent and former heavy smokers, exhibited faster increases in mobility problems compared with persistent non-smokers. Additionally, all smoking groups reported more pain symptoms than the non-smokers, at baseline and over time, but most of these differences did not reach statistical significance. Persistent heavy smokers reported elevated levels of psychological distress at baseline and over time. Conclusion. Smokers, and even some former smokers, who survive into old age appear to be at increased risk for non-life-threatening conditions that can diminish quality of life and increase demands for services.

  • 4.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Shaw, Benjamin A.
    Fors, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Social and economic conditions in childhood and the progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age2014In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 68, no 8, 734-740 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Childhood living conditions have been found to predict health and mortality in midlife and in old age. This study examines the associations between social and economic childhood conditions and the onset and progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age, and the extent to which potential associations are mediated by educational attainment and smoking. Methods Data from the Level of Living Survey and the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old were merged to create a longitudinal data set with five repeated measures from 1968 to 2004 (n=1765, aged 30-50 years and free from functional health problems at baseline). Multilevel regression models were used to analyse retrospective reports of social and economic conditions in childhood (eg, conflicts or economic problems in the family) in relation to the progression of functional health problems over the 36-year period. Results Results showed that social and economic disadvantages in childhood were associated with an earlier onset and a faster progression of functional health problems from midlife into old age. Subsequent models showed that differences in educational attainment, but not smoking, explained much of the association between childhood disadvantages and trajectories of functional health problems. Conclusions According to these results, adverse social and economic conditions in childhood affect the development of functional health problems from midlife into old age indirectly through less favourable life careers, including lower education. Creating equal opportunities for educational attainment may help reduce the long-term effects of disadvantaged childhood conditions and postpone functional health problems.

  • 5.
    Agahi, Neda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Silverstein, Merril
    Parker, Marti G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Late-Life and Earlier Participation in Leisure Activities: Their Importance for Survival Among Older Persons2011In: Activities, Adaptation & Aging, ISSN 0192-4788, Vol. 35, no 3, 210-222 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is activity participation in old age important for survival independent of one's earlier history of participation? A nationally representative sample of 457 older persons was followed for 25 years with data from the Level-of-Living Survey and the SWEOLD study. Cox regressions showed that regardless of earlier activities and health, late-life leisure engagement was associated with enhanced survival, especially among men. Among women, earlier activities (study groups) also seem important, perhaps by providing social networks. Results suggest that it is worthwhile to encourage elderly people to participate in leisure activities and to facilitate their participation in the community even at high ages.

  • 6. Ahacic, K
    et al.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in the general Swedish population from 1968 to 2002: Age, period, and cohort patterns2010In: Pain, ISSN 0304-3959, E-ISSN 1872-6623, Vol. 151, no 1, 206-214 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined age, period, and cohort patterns in musculoskeletalpainprevalence between 1968 and 2002 in the Swedishpopulation. A repeated nationally representative survey allowed cross-sectional comparisons of ages 18–75 (5 waves n ≈ 5000), and ages 77+ at later waves (2 waves n ≈ 500). Cross-sectional 10-year age group differences in 5 waves, time-lag differences between waves (shifts across time) for age groups, and within-cohort differences between waves for 10-year birth cohorts followed over time were analyzed using graphs and ordered logistic regressions. The outcome scale was based on the three items measuring slight or severe pain in back, shoulder, and joints during the past 12 months. Age–period–cohort models showed that painprevalence increased with age – mild or severe at all locations. Adjusted for the age-related increase, the cohorts followed over time did not show significant period change, except for cohorts born during 1940s. Beginning with the 1940s’ cohorts painprevalence increased over the period, and after baseline later cohorts also entered adulthood and the study with a higher painprevalence. The prevalence of pain in the adult population thus increased with the passage through age and time of the 1940s cohorts. While there were no pronounced cohort differences at baseline in 1968, results demonstrated strong age effects in pain. The results indicate that the prevalence of musculoskeletalpain among the oldest age groups may increase in the future, when more baby-boomers are entering their oldest ages.

  • 7. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Damström-Thakker, Kerstin
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Recurring alcohol-related care between 1998 and 2007 among people treated for an alcohol-related disorder in 1997: a register study in Stockholm County2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, 574- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Inpatient care for alcohol intoxication is increasing in Sweden, especially among young women. Since it is well known that alcohol disorder is a chronic relapsing illness, this study examines the extent to which people return for more care.

    METHOD: All inpatients with alcohol-related diagnoses in Stockholm County during 1997 were followed prospectively to 2007 through registers. The proportion reappearing for the same diagnosis, other alcohol-related inpatient, or outpatient care each year after baseline, as well as the number of years the inpatients reappeared were calculated (n = 2735). Three diagnoses were examined separately; alcohol dependence, harmful use of alcohol, and alcohol intoxication.

    RESULTS: Three out of five inpatients with an alcohol diagnoses reappeared for more alcohol-related inpatient care during the following decade. The proportion returning was largest the year after baseline and then decreased curvilinearly over time. The inclusion of outpatient care increased proportions, but did not change patterns. Of those with an alcohol dependence diagnosis at baseline 42 percent returned for more alcohol-related inpatient care the first, 28 percent the fifth, and 25 percent the tenth year. Corresponding proportions for harmful use and intoxication were smaller. One in five among those with an alcohol dependence returned for more than five of the ten years. Ordered logistic regressions confirmed that besides diagnosis, age and gender were independently related to the number of years returning to care.

    CONCLUSIONS: While middle-aged males with alcohol dependence were in a revolving door, young female inpatients with intoxication diagnosis returned to a comparably lower degree.

  • 8. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Kennison, Robert F.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Jönkoping University, Sweden.
    Alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use a decade after alcohol-related hospitalization: registry data linked to population-based representative postal surveys2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, 874- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although there is evident association between alcohol-related hospitalization and alcohol use, the relationship has not been well examined. This study analyzed the extent of alcohol abstinence, non-hazardous use and hazardous use among people who had experienced alcohol-related hospitalization during the preceding decade. Method: Registry data concerning alcohol-related hospitalizations between 1996 and 2007 were linked to two representative surveys, in 2006 and 2007, of residents of Stockholm County. Relevant contrasts were modeled, using logistic regression, in the pooled sample (n = 54 955). Ages were 23-84 years at follow-up. Results: Among persons previously hospitalized (n = 576), half reported non-hazardous use. Non-hazardous use was less prevalent than in the general population - and the extent of non-hazardous use did not change over time following hospitalization. There were no significant age differences, but non-hazardous use was less frequent among people with repeated episodes of care. One in six was abstinent. Abstinence was more common among the old, while hazardous use (exceeding 14 drinks per week for men, and 9 drinks per week for women) decreased with age. Abstinence also increased over time; among persons hospitalized ten years ago, the abstinence rate was twice that of the general population. Associations with hazardous use over time were less conclusive. Hazardous use among those previously hospitalized decreased over time in one sample but not in the other. After pooling the data, there were indications of a decrease over time following hospitalization, but more prevalent hazardous use than in the general population. Conclusions: Following alcohol-related hospitalization, abstinence increased, and there was no evidence of regression towards the mean, i.e., towards non-hazardous use. Abstinence was also more widespread among previously hospitalized persons of older ages. With advancing age, changing hazardous alcohol habits among previously hospitalized appears to yield a trend towards promotion of abstinence.

  • 9. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Kennison, Robert F.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Changes in sobriety in the Swedish population over three decades: age, period or cohort effects?2012In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 107, no 4, 748-755 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims  This study aimed to examine age, cohort and period trends in alcohol abstinence.

    Design  Two surveys, the Level of Living Survey collected in 1968, 1974, 1981, 1990 and 2000, and the Swedish Panel Study of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) collected in 1992 and 2002, were studied with graphical depictions of cross-sectional and longitudinal data presented over time and over age. Cross-sectional 10-year age group differences, time-lag differences between waves and within-cohort differences between waves for 10-year birth cohorts were examined. Logistic regression models were applied to confirm the observed patterns.

    Setting  The samples were representative of the Swedish population.

    Participants  Participants ranged in age from 18 to 75 (n = 5000 per wave), and 77+ at later waves (n = 500).

    Measurements  Alcohol abstinence was determined by asking ‘Do you ever drink wine, beer, or spirits?’, where a ‘no’ response indicated abstinence.

    Findings  Decreases in abstinence rates were observed from 1968 to 2000/02. While cross-sectional analysis indicated increased abstinence with advancing age, the longitudinal analysis suggested otherwise. Inspection of cohort differences revealed little change within cohorts and large differences between cohorts; abstinence rates declined in later-born cohorts up to the 1940s birth cohorts; stability was observed in cohorts born since the 1940s. Logistic regression models indicated that neither age nor period were significant (P > 0.05) predictors of abstinence when cohort (P < 0.001) was included.

    Conclusion  Decreasing proportions of total alcohol abstainers in Sweden from 1968 to 2000 appear to be attributable primarily to decreases in successive cohorts rather than drinkers becoming abstainers.

  • 10. Ahacic, Kozma
    et al.
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Karolinska Institute .
    Helgason, Asgeir R.
    Allebeck, Peter
    Non-response bias and hazardous alcohol use in relation to previous alcohol-related hospitalization: comparing survey responses with population data2013In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 8, 10- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study examines whether alcohol-related hospitalization predicts survey non-response, and evaluates whether this missing data result in biased estimates of the prevalence of hazardous alcohol use and abstinence. Methods: Registry data on alcohol-related hospitalizations during the preceding ten years were linked to two representative surveys. Population data corresponding to the surveys were derived from the Stockholm County registry. The alcohol-related hospitalization rates for survey responders were compared with the population data, and corresponding rates for non-responders were based on the differences between the two estimates. The proportions with hazardous alcohol use and abstinence were calculated separately for previously hospitalized and non-hospitalized responders, and non-responders were assumed to be similar to responders in this respect. Results: Persons with previous alcohol-related admissions were more likely currently to abstain from alcohol (RR=1.58, p<.001) or to have hazardous alcohol use (RR=2.06, p<.001). Alternatively, they were more than twice as likely to have become non-responders. Adjusting for this skewed non-response, i. e., the underrepresentation of hazardous users and abstainers among the hospitalized, made little difference to the estimated rates of hazardous use and abstinence in total. During the ten-year period 1.7% of the population were hospitalized. Conclusions: Few people receive alcohol-related hospital care and it remains unclear whether this group's underrepresentation in surveys is generalizable to other groups, such as hazardous users. While people with severe alcohol problems - i.e. a history of alcohol-related hospitalizations -are less likely to respond to population surveys, this particular bias is not likely to alter prevalence estimates of hazardous use.

  • 11. Alakurtti, Kati
    et al.
    Johansson, Jarkko J.
    Joutsa, Juho
    Laine, Matti
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Rinne, Juha O.
    Long-term test-retest reliability of striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D-2/3 receptor binding: study with [C-11]raclopride and high-resolution PET2015In: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, ISSN 0271-678X, E-ISSN 1559-7016, Vol. 35, no 7, 1199-1205 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We measured the long-term test-retest reliability of [C-11]raclopride binding in striatal subregions, the thalamus and the cortex using the bolus-plus-infusion method and a high-resolution positron emission scanner. Seven healthy male volunteers underwent two positron emission tomography (PET) [C-11]raclopride assessments, with a 5-week retest interval. D-2/3 receptor availability was quantified as binding potential using the simplified reference tissue model. Absolute variability (VAR) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values indicated very good reproducibility for the striatum and were 4.5%/0.82, 3.9%/0.83, and 3.9%/0.82, for the caudate nucleus, putamen, and ventral striatum, respectively. Thalamic reliability was also very good, with VAR of 3.7% and ICC of 0.92. Test-retest data for cortical areas showed good to moderate reproducibility (6.1% to 13.1%). Our results are in line with previous test-retest studies of [C-11]raclopride binding in the striatum. A novel finding is the relatively low variability of [C-11]raclopride binding, providing suggestive evidence that extrastriatal D-2/3 binding can be studied in vivo with [C-11]raclopride PET to be verified in future studies.

  • 12. Almborg, Ann-Helene
    et al.
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Use of the international classification of functioning, disability and health (ICF) in social services for elderly in Sweden2012In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 11, 959-964 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT To examine the content of health information in acts of social services of elderly people in relation to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) and to describe the health information in the different parts of the acts according to the ICF. Health information of 25 acts from four municipalities was analysed and the concepts were linked to ICF codes, using the established coding rules. The health information consisted of 372 concepts, which were linked to 122 specific ICF codes. The concepts in the acts were mostly linked to the ICF component Activities and Participation, except for the current functioning concepts where the ICF component Body functions was the most frequent. The 3rd level was most frequent in Activities and Participation and in Environmental factors, and the 2nd level was most frequent in Body functions. The ICF covers the concepts and terms contained in the acts to a large extent. Furthermore, the results show that the ICF codes differ in the different parts of the acts. The ICF provides a coherent and structured documentation, which contributes to a legally secure assessment of assistance. The selection of ICF codes can be used in development of "code sets" for social services for elderly.

  • 13. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Crowe, Michael
    Feychting, Maria
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Johansson, Boo
    Gatz, Margaret
    Work-Related Exposure to Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields and Dementia: Results from the Population-Based Study of Dementia in Swedish Twins2010In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 65A, no 11, 1220-1227 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. We examined the association between extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (EMF) and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease using all 9,508 individuals from the Study of Dementia in Swedish Twins (HARMONY) with valid occupational and diagnostic data.

    Methods. Dementia diagnoses were based on telephone screening followed by in-person clinical workup. Main lifetime occupation was coded according to an established EMF exposure matrix. Covariates were age, gender, education, vascular risk factors, and complexity of work. Based on previous research, data were also analyzed separately for cases with disease onset by age 75 years versus later, men versus women, and those with manual versus nonmanual main occupation. We used generalized estimating equations with the entire sample (to adjust for the inclusion of complete twin pairs) and conditional logistic regression with complete twin pairs only.

    Results. Level of EMF exposure was not significantly associated with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. However, in stratified analyses, medium and high levels of EMF exposure were associated with increased dementia risk compared with low level in cases with onset by age 75 years (odds ratio: 1.94, 95% confidence interval: 1.07–3.65 for medium, odds ratio: 2.01, 95% confidence interval: 1.10–3.65 for high) and in participants with manual occupations (odds ratio: 1.81, 95% confidence interval: 1.06–3.09 for medium, odds ratio: 1.75, 95% confidence interval: 1.00–3.05 for high). Results with 42 twin pairs discordant for dementia did not reach statistical significance.

    Conclusions. Occupational EMF exposure appears relevant primarily to dementia with an earlier onset and among former manual workers.

  • 14. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Crowe, Michael
    Hahn, Elizabeth A.
    Mortimer, James
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Johansson, Boo
    Gatz, Margaret
    Work-Related Stress May Increase the Risk of Vascular Dementia2012In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 60, no 1, 60-67 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine job control, job demands, social support at work, and job strain (ratio of demands to control) in relation to risk of any dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD). DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: The population-based Study of Dementia in Swedish Twins. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred fifty-seven people with dementia (167 AD, 46 VaD) and 9,849 without. MEASUREMENTS: Dementia diagnoses were based on telephone screening for cognitive impairment followed by in-person clinical examination. An established job exposure matrix was matched to main occupation categories to measure work characteristics. RESULTS: In generalized estimating equations (adjusted for the inclusion of complete twin pairs), lower job control was associated with greater risk of any dementia (odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.04-1.31) and VaD specifically (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.07-1.81). Lower social support at work was associated with greater risk of dementia (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.03-1.28), AD (OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.00-1.31), and VaD (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02-1.60). Greater job strain was associated with greater risk of VaD only (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.02-1.60), especially in combination with low social support (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.11-1.64). Age, sex, and education were controlled for. Work complexity, manual work, and vascular disease did not explain the results. No differences in work-related stress scores were observed in the 54 twin pairs discordant for dementia, although only two pairs included a twin with VaD. CONCLUSION: Work-related stress, including low job control and low social support at work, may increase the risk of dementia, particularly VaD. Modification to work environment, including attention to social context and provision of meaningful roles for employees, may contribute to efforts to promote cognitive health.

  • 15. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Crowe, Michael
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Wastesson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Parker, Marti G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Indicators of Job Strain at Midlife and Cognitive Functioning in Advanced Old Age2011In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 66B, no 3, 287-291 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives. We used data from SWEOLD, a Swedish nationally representative study of individuals aged 77 years or older, to examine midlife indicators of job strain in relation to cognitive performance and impairment.

    Methods. In all, 827 participants completed an abridged 11-point version of the Mini-Mental State Examination in-person in 1992 and/or 2002 and had self-reported and/or occupation-based scores for job control and demands from data collected in 1968. Seventeen percent scored below the cutoff for cognitive impairment.

    Results. Controlling for age, sex, education, self-rated health, and year of cognitive screening, low self-reported and occupation-based job control at midlife was associated with poorer cognitive performance later (ps < .001). For the occupation-based measure, low job control was also associated with greater likelihood of impairment, whereas having an active job (high job control/high job demands) was associated with better cognitive performance and lower likelihood of impairment (ps < .01). Childhood environment, midlife depressive symptoms, and social activity had limited influence, whereas the influence of both adulthood socioeconomic position and work complexity on these results was more pronounced.

    Discussion. Job control at midlife, by itself and in combination with job demands, may influence cognitive functioning later above and beyond demographic variables and other occupational characteristics.

  • 16. Andel, Ross
    et al.
    Silverstein, Merril
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Jönköping University, Sweden.
    The Role of Midlife Occupational Complexity and Leisure Activity in Late-Life Cognition2015In: The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences, ISSN 1079-5014, E-ISSN 1758-5368, Vol. 70, no 2, 314-321 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether occupational complexity of working with data or people, and cognitive or social leisure activity at midlife predicted cognition in advanced old age.

    METHODS: We used 810 eligible participants from Longitudinal Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old, a Swedish nationally representative study of individuals aged 77+ with cognitive assessments (an abridged version of the Mini-Mental State Exam) administered in 1992 and 2002 and linked to information about their midlife occupation and leisure activities collected in 1968 and 1981. A bootstrapping technique was applied to examine the direct and interactive associations of occupational complexity and leisure activity with late-life cognition.

    RESULTS: Controlling for demographic and health-related factors from childhood, midlife, and late life, we found that greater work complexity, both with people and with data, and greater participation in cognitive or social leisure activities independently related to better late-life cognitive scores. The complexity-cognition link was moderated by leisure activity such that the cognitive benefit related to the complexity of work-especially complexity of working with people-was rendered insignificant when participation in leisure activities-especially social activities-was above average.

    DISCUSSION: Results are discussed in terms of using work complexity to compensate for lack of leisure activity as well as in terms of promoting leisure engagement to compensate for long-term cognitive disadvantage imposed by working in less challenging occupations.

  • 17. Andersen, Zorana J.
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Pedersen, Marie
    Galassi, Claudia
    Jørgensen, Jeanette T.
    Oudin, Anna
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Olsson, David
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aasvang, Gunn Marit
    Aamodt, Geir
    Pyko, Andrei
    Pershagen, Göran
    Korek, Michal
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Eriksen, Kirsten T.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Plusquin, Michelle
    Key, Timothy J.
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Lang, Alois
    Wang, Meng
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Fournier, Agnes
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Baglietto, Laura
    Grioni, Sara
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Migliore, Enrica
    Tamayo-Uria, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Vermeulen, Roel
    Sokhi, Ranjeet
    Keuken, Menno
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Beelen, Rob
    Vineis, Paolo
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Incidence of Postmenopausal Breast Cancer in 15 European Cohorts within the ESCAPE Project2017In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 125, no 10, UNSP 107005Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence on the association between ambient air pollution and breast cancer risk is inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between long-term exposure to ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women. METHODS: In 15 cohorts from nine European countries, individual estimates of air pollution levels at the residence were estimated by standardized land-usc regression models developed within the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE) and Transport related Air Pollution and Health impacts - Integrated Methodologies for Assessing Particulate Mattcr (TRANSPHORM) projects: particulate matter (PM) <= 2.5 mu m, <= 10 mu m, and 2.5-10 mu m in diameter (PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse, respectively); PM2.5 absorbance; nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); traffic intensity; and elemental composition of PM. We estimated cohort-specific associations between breast cancer and air pollutants using Cox regression models, adjusting for major lifestyle risk factors, and pooled cohort-specific estimates using random-effects meta-analyses. RESULTS: Of 74,750 postmenopausal women included in the study, 3,612 developed breast cancer during 991,353 person-years of follow-up. We found positive and statistically insignificant associations between breast cancer and PM2.5 [hazard ratio (FIR) = 1.08 [95% confidence interval (Cl): 0.77, 1.51] per 5 mu g/m(3)}, PM10 [1.07 (95% CI: 0.89, 1.30) per 10 mu g/m(3)], PMcoarse [1.20 (95% Cl: 0.96, 1.49 per 5 mu g/m(3)], and NO2 [1.02 (95% CI: 0.98, 1.07 per 10 mu g/m(3)], and a statistically significant association with NOx [1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) per 20 mu g/m(3), p = 0.04]. CONCLUSIONS: We-found suggestive evidence of an association between ambient air pollution and incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer in European women.

  • 18.
    Andersson, Håkan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Grabell, Adam
    Department of clinical and developmental psychology, University of Michigan, MI, United States.
    Chang, Hyein
    Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, South Korea.
    Lovén, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Olson, Sheryl
    Department of clinical and developmental psychology, University of Michigan, MI, United States.
    The Contribution of Hot and Cool Self-Regulation in Early Childhood to Later Academic AchievementManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the contribution of hot (emotional/motivational) and cool (cognitive) self-regulation in early childhood to lateracademic achievement in kindergarten (math) and late elementary school (math andlanguage). In a sample of 235 preschoolers, higher levels of cool self-regulation predicted better math achievement in kindergarten and this head-start effect persisted into late elementary school. In contrast, higher levels of hot self-regulation predicted better language but not math achievement in late elementary school. These findings support the notion that cool self-regulation is important for the development of academic skills already inkindergarten, whereas the effects on academic achievement of hot self-regulation are delayed, which may be a result of increasing demands through elementary school.

  • 19. Andrieu, S.
    et al.
    Aboderin, I.
    Baeyens, J.-P.
    Beard, J.
    Benetos, A.
    Berrut, G.
    Brainin, M.
    Cha, H.-B.
    Chen, L.-K.
    Du, P.
    Forette, B.
    Franco, A.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Gillette-Guyonnet, S.
    Gold, G.
    Gomez, F.
    Guimaraes, R.
    Gustafson, D.
    Khachaturian, A.
    Luchsinger, J.
    Mangialasche, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Mathiex-Fortunet, H.
    Michel, J.-P.
    Richard, E.
    Schneider, L.S.
    Solomon, Alina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). 1Institute of Clinical Medicine-Neurology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
    Vellas, B.
    IAGG workshop: health promotion program on prevention of late onset dementia2011In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 15, no 7, 562-575 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Angleman, Sara B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Santoni, Giola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Pilotto, Alberto
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Karolinska Institutet.
    Welmer, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Multidimensional Prognostic Index in Association with Future Mortality and Number of Hospital Days in a Population-Based Sample of Older Adults: Results of the EU Funded MPI_AGE Project2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 7, e0133789Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI) has been found to predict mortality in patients with a variety of clinical conditions. We aimed to assess the association of the MPI with future mortality and number of in-hospital days for the first time in a population-based cohort. Methods The study population consisted of 2472 persons, aged 66-99 years, from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Sweden, who underwent the baseline visit 2001-4, and were followed up >10 years for in-hospital days and >12 years for mortality. The MPI was a modified version of the original and aggregated seven domains (personal and instrumental activities of daily living, cognitive function, illness severity and comorbidity, number of medications, co-habitation status, and nutritional status). The MPI score was divided into risk groups: low, medium and high. Number of in-hospital days (within 1, 3 and 10 years) and mortality data were derived from official registries. All analyses were age-stratified (sexagenarians, septuagenarians, octogenarians, nonagenarians). Results During the follow-up 1331 persons (53.8%) died. Laplace regression models, suggested that median survival in medium risk groups varied by age from 2.2-3.6 years earlier than for those in the corresponding low risk groups (p = 0.002-p<0.001), and median survival in high risk groups varied by age from 3.8-9.0 years earlier than for corresponding low risk groups (p<0.001). For nonagenarians, the median age at death was 3.8 years earlier in the high risk group than for the low risk group (p<0.001). The mean number of in-hospital days increased significantly with higher MPI risk score within 1 and 3 years for people of each age group. Conclusion For the first time, the effectiveness of MPI has been verified in a population-based cohort. Higher MPI risk scores associated with more days in hospital and with fewer years of survival, across a broad and stratified age range.

  • 21.
    Angleman, Sara B.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm Gerontology Research Center, Sweden.
    Santoni, Giola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Von Strauss, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). The Swedish Red Cross University College, Sweden.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). The Swedish Red Cross University College, Sweden.
    Temporal Trends of Functional Dependence and Survival Among Older Adults From 1991 to 2010 in Sweden: Toward a Healthier Aging2015In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 70, no 6, 746-752 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Declines in functional dependence among older adults were observed before the 1990s, but there is uncertainty about subsequent trends. Our study aimed to verify the temporal trends in disability during 1991-2010 in an older Swedish population and to estimate the associated changes in survival. Methods. Functional status in octogenarians and nonagenarians was assessed at seven occasions with intervals of 2-3 years. Sample size varied at each assessment with an average of 646 (range 212-1096). Disability was defined as difficulty in one or more of personal activities of daily living. We compared prevalence and incidence, as well as mortality, and survival associated with disability over the 20-year period. Results. Sex-standardized prevalence of disability remained steady over time with a tendency toward a gradual decline, and a statistically significant decrease was present among nonagenarians. Sex-standardized cumulative incidence also remained steady. The proportion of people with prevalent disability who died <3 years remained stable, as did the survival time of people with incident disability. In contrast, among nondisabled persons, 3-year mortality decreased significantly, and for octogenarians median survival time was 1.3 years longer at the more recent assessment than a decade earlier. Conclusions. Both prevalence and incidence of disability remained stable over the last two decades in this urban Swedish population, with a trend toward a slow decline. Mortality remained steady among disabled persons but decreased among persons without disability, suggesting that increased life expectancy during the last two decades may be essentially driven by longer lives of functionally independent people.

  • 22. Anstey, Kaarin J.
    et al.
    Cherbuin, Nicolas
    Herath, Pushpani M.
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kuller, Lewis H.
    Lopez, Oscar L.
    Wilson, Robert S.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    A Self-Report Risk Index to Predict Occurrence of Dementia in Three Independent Cohorts of Older Adults: The ANU-ADRI2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 1, e86141- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Aims: The Australian National University AD Risk Index (ANU-ADRI, http://anuadri.anu.edu.au) is a self-report risk index developed using an evidence-based medicine approach to measure risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We aimed to evaluate the extent to which the ANU-ADRI can predict the risk of AD in older adults and to compare the ANU-ADRI to the dementia risk index developed from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study for middle-aged cohorts. Methods: This study included three validation cohorts, i.e., the Rush Memory and Aging Study (MAP) (n = 903, age >= 53 years), the Kungsholmen Project (KP) (n = 905, age >= 75 years), and the Cardiovascular Health Cognition Study (CVHS) (n = 2496, age >= 65 years) that were each followed for dementia. Baseline data were collected on exposure to the 15 risk factors included in the ANU-ADRI of which MAP had 10, KP had 8 and CVHS had 9. Risk scores and C-statistics were computed for individual participants for the ANU-ADRI and the CAIDE index. Results: For the ANU-ADRI using available data, the MAP study c-statistic was 0.637 (95% CI 0.596-0.678), for the KP study it was 0.740 (0.712-0.768) and for the CVHS it was 0.733 (0.691-0.776) for predicting AD. When a common set of risk and protective factors were used c-statistics were 0.689 (95% CI 0.650-0.727), 0.666 (0.628-0.704) and 0.734 (0.707-0.761) for MAP, KP and CVHS respectively. Results for CAIDE ranged from c-statistics of 0.488 (0.427-0.554) to 0.595 (0.565-0.625). Conclusion: A composite risk score derived from the ANU-ADRI weights including 8-10 risk or protective factors is a valid, self-report tool to identify those at risk of AD and dementia. The accuracy can be further improved in studies including more risk factors and younger cohorts with long-term follow-up.

  • 23. Athanasiu, Lavinia
    et al.
    Giddaluru, Sudheer
    Fernandes, Carla
    Christoforou, Andrea
    Reinvang, Ivar
    Lundervold, Astri J.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Umeå University, Sweden.
    Kauppi, Karolina
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Eriksson, Elias
    Sundet, Kjetil
    Djurovic, Srdjan
    Espeseth, Thomas
    Nyberg, Lars
    Steen, Vidar M.
    Andreassen, Ole A.
    Le Hellard, Stephanie
    A genetic association study of CSMD1 and CSMD2 with cognitive function2017In: Brain, behavior, and immunity, ISSN 0889-1591, E-ISSN 1090-2139, Vol. 61, 209-216 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complement cascade plays a role in synaptic pruning and synaptic plasticity, which seem to be involved in cognitive functions and psychiatric disorders. Genetic variants in the closely related CSMD1 and CSMD2 genes, which are implicated in complement regulation, are associated with schizophrenia. Since patients with schizophrenia often show cognitive impairments, we tested whether variants in CSMD1 and CSMD2 are also associated with cognitive functions per se. We took a discovery-replication approach, using well-characterized Scandinavian cohorts. A total of 1637 SNPs in CSMD1 and 206 SNPs in CSMD2 were tested for association with cognitive functions in the NCNG sample (Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics; n = 670). Replication testing of SNPs with p-value < 0.001 (7 in CSMD1 and 3 in CSMD2) was carried out in the TOP sample (Thematically Organized Psychosis; n =1025) and the BETULA sample (Betula Longitudinal Study on aging, memory and dementia; n = 1742). Finally, we conducted a meta-analysis of these SNPs using all three samples. The previously identified schizophrenia marker in CSMD1 (SNP rs10503253) was also included. The strongest association was observed between the CSMDI SNP rs2740931 and performance in immediate episodic memory (p-value = 5 Chi 10(-6), minor allele A, MAF 0.48-0.49, negative direction of effect). This association reached the study-wide significance level (p <= 1.2 Chi 10(-5)). SNP rs10503253 was not significantly associated with cognitive functions in our samples. In conclusion, we studied n = 3437 individuals and found evidence that a variant in CSMD1 is associated with cognitive function. Additional studies of larger samples with cognitive phenotypes will be needed to further clarify the role of CSMD1 in cognitive phenotypes in health and disease.

  • 24.
    Atti, Anna Rita
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Forlani, Claudia
    de Ronchi, Diana
    Palmer, Katie
    Casadio, Paola
    Dalmonte, Edoardo
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Cognitive Impairment after Age 60: clinical and Social Correlates in the "Faenza Project"2010In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, Vol. 21, no 4, 1325-1334 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A total of 7,389 dementia-free elderly (60–102 years old) enrolled in the "Faenza Project" (Northern Italy) were clinically evaluated by nurses and physicians with the aim of detecting the independent and combined association of medical and social factors with cognitive status. Cognitive Impairment No Dementia (CIND) was defined for MMSE scores ⩽ 2 standard deviations than the age- and education-corrected mean score obtained by the non-demented persons of the Faenza cohort. Logistic Regression analysis was used to estimate Odds Ratios and 95% Confidence Intervals (OR, 95%CI) for CIND. The diagnostic procedure identified 402 (5.4%) CIND cases. Diabetes (OR, 95%CI=1.6, 1.2–2.2), stroke (OR, 95%CI=1.9, 1.4–2.6), and depressive symptoms (OR, 95%CI=1.9, 1.4–2.7) emerged as the most relevant medical comorbidities of CIND. Low education (OR, 95%CI=1.8, 1.1–2.9), low Socio Economic Status (SES) (OR, 95%CI=1.5, 1.1–2.1), and unmarried status (OR, 95%CI=1.7, 1.2–2.5) were associated with CIND. Medical and social factors were independently related to CIND occurrence. In comparison to subjects without any of the above mentioned conditions, subjects with one medical and one social factor had an OR, 95%CI for CIND equal to 6.0, 2.9–12.4. The strength of the association increased when more of those conditions occurred in combination, suggesting a synergistic effect. Despite some methodological limitations, data from this cross-sectional population-based Italian study show that low education, low SES, unmarried status together with diabetes, stroke, and depressive symptoms are related to cognitive impairment in the general population. The interaction of medical and social factors further increases the probability of CIND.

  • 25. Bach, Dominik R.
    et al.
    Guitart-Masip, Marc
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Packard, Pau A.
    Miro, Julia
    Falip, Merce
    Fuentemilla, Lluis
    Dolan, Raymond J.
    Human Hippocampus Arbitrates Approach-Avoidance Conflict2014In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 24, no 5, 541-547 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance [1, 2]. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus [2-6]. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts [7, 8] are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate [9]. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus [10]. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus.

  • 26. Bao, Cuiping
    et al.
    Yang, Xilin
    Xu, Weili
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Tianjin Med Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Sch Publ Hlth, Tianjin, Peoples R China.
    Luo, Hongbin
    Xu, Zhongliang
    Su, Cheng
    Qi, Xiuying
    Diabetes mellitus and incidence and mortality of kidney cancer: A meta-analysis2013In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 27, no 4, 357-364 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Diabetes is associated with increased risk of a spectrum of cancers, but there are few meta-analyses on the association between diabetes and kidney cancer. We performed a meta-analysis of case-control studies and cohort studies to address the incidence and mortality of kidney cancer in diabetes. Methods: Studies were identified by searching PubMed database and manual assessment of the cited references in the retrieved articles. Study-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using a random-effect model. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Results: A total of 24 studies were included. We found that diabetes was significantly associated with increased risk of kidney cancer (RR=1.40, 95% CI = 1.16 to 1.69), and the results were consistent between case-control and cohort studies. A slightly stronger positive relation was observed in women (RR = 1.47, 95% CI=1.18 to 1.83) than in men (RR=1.28, 95% CI=1.10 to 1.48). Additional analyses indicated that the increased risk of kidney cancer was independent of alcohol consumption, body mass index (BMI)/obesity and smoking. However, there was no association between diabetes and mortality of kidney cancer (RR=1.12, 95% CI=0.99 to 1.20), without heterogeneity (P = 0.419, I-2 = 1.8%). Conclusions: Diabetes mellitus may increase the risk of kidney cancer in both women and men.

  • 27. Barbosa, Cristina
    et al.
    Feio, Paulo
    Fernandes, Ana
    Thorslund, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    GOVERNANCE STRATEGIES TO AN AGEING SOCIETY - LOCAL ROLL IN MULTI LEVEL PROCESSES2016In: Journal of Comparative Politics, ISSN 1337-7477, E-ISSN 1338-1385, Vol. 9, no 1, 4-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographic ageing marks strategic orientations and public policies. It's a challenge to societies, public and private institutions and Welfare State. The goal of this study is to understand the local governance strategies to an ageing population and the role of the local in multilevel governance processes. A qualitative methodology it was followed that supports analysis and understanding of both local ageing policies. The samples are case studies of two contexts, Portugal and Sweden, respectively city councils of Lisbon and Nacka, where stakeholders were interviewed. Different concepts and visions influence local ageing policies. Vertical coordination is easier to follow in Portugal, but without concrete laws, and in Sweden, horizontal coordination is emphasized between providers and municipalities. Local public intervention in ageing seeks renewed actions and this study allows to conclude that a perfect local policy doesn't exist. However in many aspects, can be complementary.

  • 28.
    Becker, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Kalpouzos, Grégoria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Persson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Laukka, Erika J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Differential Effects of Encoding Instructions on Brain Activity Patterns of Item and Associative Memory2017In: Journal of cognitive neuroscience, ISSN 0898-929X, E-ISSN 1530-8898, Vol. 29, no 3, 545-559 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests a critical role of hippocampus and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in associative relative to item encoding. Here, we investigated similarities and differences in functional brain correlates for associative and item memory as a function of encoding instruction. Participants received either incidental (animacy judgments) or intentional encoding instructions while fMRI was employed during the encoding of associations and items. In a subsequent recognition task, memory performance of participants receiving intentional encoding instructions was higher compared with those receiving incidental encoding instructions. Furthermore, participants remembered more items than associations, regardless of encoding instruction. Greater brain activation in the left anterior hippocampus was observed for intentionally compared with incidentally encoded associations, although activity in this region was not modulated by the type of instruction for encoded items. Furthermore, greater activity in the left anterior hippocampus and left IFG was observed during intentional associative compared with item encoding. The same regions were related to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations and were thus task relevant. Similarly, connectivity of the anterior hippocampus to the right superior temporal lobe and IFG was uniquely linked to subsequent memory of intentionally encoded associations. Our study demonstrates the differential involvement of anterior hippocampus in intentional relative to incidental associative encoding. This finding likely reflects that the intent to remember triggers a specific binding process accomplished by this region.

  • 29.
    Becker, Nina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Laukka, Erika J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Kalpouzos, Gregoria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Structural brain correlates of associative memory in older adults2015In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 118, 146-153 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Associative memory involves binding two or more items into a coherent memory episode. Relative to memory for single items, associative memory declines greatly in aging. However, older individuals vary substantially in their ability to memorize associative information. Although functional studies link associative memory to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and prefrontal cortex (PFC), little is known about how volumetric differences in MTL and PFC might contribute to individual differences in associative memory. We investigated regional gray-matter volumes related to individual differences in associative memory in a sample of healthy older adults (n = 54; age = 60 years). To differentiate item from associative memory, participants intentionally learned face-scene picture pairs before performing a recognition task that included single faces, scenes, and face-scene pairs. Gray-matter volumes were analyzed using voxel-based morphometry region-of-interest (ROI) analyses. To examine volumetric differences specifically for associative memory, item memory was controlled for in the analyses. Behavioral results revealed large variability in associative memory that mainly originated from differences in false-alarm rates. Moreover, associative memory was independent of individuals' ability to remember single items. Older adults with better associative memory showed larger gray-matter volumes primarily in regions of the left and right lateral PFC. These findings provide evidence for the importance of PFC in intentional learning of associations, likely because of its involvement in organizational and strategic processes that distinguish older adults with good from those with poor associative memory.

  • 30. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Hoek, Gerard
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul H.
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.
    Xun, Wei W.
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Vartiainen, Erkki
    Lanki, Timo
    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja
    Oftedal, Bente
    Schwarze, Per E.
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Otstenson, Claes-Goran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Goran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Sorensen, Mette
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Kramer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Jaensch, Andrea
    Ineichen, Alex
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.
    Schindler, Christian
    Ragettli, Martina S.
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Keuken, Menno
    Jedynska, Aleksandra
    Kooter, Ingeborg M.
    Kukkonen, Jaakko
    Sokhi, Ranjeet S.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Natural-Cause Mortality and Long-Term Exposure to Particle Components: An Analysis of 19 European Cohorts within the Multi-Center ESCAPE Project2015In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 123, no 6, 525-533 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies have shown associations between mortality and long-term exposure to particulate matter air pollution. Few cohort studies have estimated the effects of the elemental composition of particulate matter on mortality. Objectives: Our aim was to study the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to elemental components of particulate matter. Methods: Mortality and confounder data from 19 European cohort studies were used. Residential exposure to eight a priori-selected components of particulate matter ( PM) was characterized following a strictly standardized protocol. Annual average concentrations of copper, iron, potassium, nickel, sulfur, silicon, vanadium, and zinc within PM size fractions <= 2.5 mu m (PM2.5) and <= 10 mu m (PM10) were estimated using land-use regression models. Cohort-specific statistical analyses of the associations between mortality and air pollution were conducted using Cox proportional hazards models using a common protocol followed by meta-analysis. Results: The total study population consisted of 291,816 participants, of whom 25,466 died from a natural cause during follow-up (average time of follow-up, 14.3 years). Hazard ratios were positive for almost all elements and statistically significant for PM2.5 sulfur (1.14; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.23 per 200ng/m(3)). In a two-pollutant model, the association with PM2.5 sulfur was robust to adjustment for PM2.5 mass, whereas the association with PM2.5 mass was reduced. Conclusions: Long-term exposure to PM2.5 sulfur was associated with natural-cause mortality. This association was robust to adjustment for other pollutants and PM2.5.

  • 31. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Fischer, Paul
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Vineis, Paolo
    Xun, Wei W.
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Oudin, Anna
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Modig, Lars
    Havulinna, Aki S.
    Lanki, Timo
    Turunen, Anu
    Oftedal, Bente
    Nystad, Wenche
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pershagen, Göran
    Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup
    Overvad, Kim
    Ellermann, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Kraemer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Hampel, Regina
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Kuenzli, Nino
    Schindler, Christian
    Schikowski, Tamara
    Adam, Martin
    Phuleria, Harish
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Declercq, Christophe
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Hoek, Gerard
    Effects of long-term exposure to air pollution on natural-cause mortality: an analysis of 22 European cohorts within the multicentre ESCAPE project2014In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 383, no 9919, 785-795 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Few studies on long-term exposure to air pollution and mortality have been reported from Europe. Within the multicentre European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we aimed to investigate the association between natural-cause mortality and long-term exposure to several air pollutants. Methods We used data from 22 European cohort studies, which created a total study population of 367 251 participants. All cohorts were general population samples, although some were restricted to one sex only. With a strictly standardised protocol, we assessed residential exposure to air pollutants as annual average concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with diameters of less than 2.5 mu m (PM2.5), less than 10 mu m (PM10), and between 10 mu m and 2.5 mu m (PMcoarse), PM2.5 absorbance, and annual average concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx), with land use regression models. We also investigated two traffic intensity variables-traffic intensity on the nearest road (vehicles per day) and total traffic load on all major roads within a 100 m buff er. We did cohort-specific statistical analyses using confounder models with increasing adjustment for confounder variables, and Cox proportional hazards models with a common protocol. We obtained pooled effect estimates through a random-effects meta-analysis. Findings The total study population consisted of 367 251 participants who contributed 5 118 039 person-years at risk (average follow-up 13.9 years), of whom 29 076 died from a natural cause during follow-up. A significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for PM2.5 of 1.07 (95% CI 1.02-1.13) per 5 mu g/m(3) was recorded. No heterogeneity was noted between individual cohort effect estimates (I-2 p value=0.95). HRs for PM2.5 remained significantly raised even when we included only participants exposed to pollutant concentrations lower than the European annual mean limit value of 25 mu g/m(3) (HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.00-1.12) or below 20 mu g/m(3) (1.07, 1.01-1.13). Interpretation Long-term exposure to fine particulate air pollution was associated with natural-cause mortality, even within concentration ranges well below the present European annual mean limit value.

  • 32. Beelen, Rob
    et al.
    Stafoggia, Massimo
    Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole
    Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic
    Xun, Wei W.
    Katsouyanni, Klea
    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina
    Brunekreef, Bert
    Weinmayr, Gudrun
    Hoffmann, Barbara
    Wolf, Kathrin
    Samoli, Evangelia
    Houthuijs, Danny
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark
    Oudin, Anna
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Olsson, David
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Lanki, Timo
    Yli-Tuomi, Tarja
    Oftedal, Bente
    Aamodt, Geir
    Nafstad, Per
    De Faire, Ulf
    Pedersen, Nancy L.
    Östenson, Claes-Göran
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Penell, Johanna
    Korek, Michal
    Pyko, Andrei
    Thorup Eriksen, Kirsten
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Becker, Thomas
    Eeftens, Marloes
    Bots, Michiel
    Meliefste, Kees
    Wang, Meng
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Sugiri, Dorothea
    Kraemer, Ursula
    Heinrich, Joachim
    de Hoogh, Kees
    Key, Timothy
    Peters, Annette
    Cyrys, Josef
    Concin, Hans
    Nagel, Gabriele
    Ineichen, Alex
    Schaffner, Emmanuel
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Dratva, Julia
    Ducret-Stich, Regina
    Vilier, Alice
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Stempfelet, Morgane
    Grioni, Sara
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tsai, Ming-Yi
    Marcon, Alessandro
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Galassi, Claudia
    Migliore, Enrica
    Ranzi, Andrea
    Cesaroni, Giulia
    Badaloni, Chiara
    Forastiere, Francesco
    Tamayo, Ibon
    Amiano, Pilar
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Katsoulis, Michail
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Vineis, Paolo
    Hoek, Gerard
    Long-term Exposure to Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Mortality An Analysis of 22 European Cohorts2014In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 3, 368-378 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Air pollution has been associated with cardiovascular mortality, but it remains unclear as to whether specific pollutants are related to specific cardiovascular causes of death. Within the multicenter European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE), we investigated the associations of long-term exposure to several air pollutants with all cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, as well as with specific cardiovascular causes of death. Methods: Data from 22 European cohort studies were used. Using a standardized protocol, study area-specific air pollution exposure at the residential address was characterized as annual average concentrations of the following: nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOx); particles with diameters of less than 2.5 mu m (PM2.5), less than 10 mu m (PM10), and 10 mu m to 2.5 mu m (PMcoarse); PM2.5 absorbance estimated by land-use regression models; and traffic indicators. We applied cohort-specific Cox proportional hazards models using a standardized protocol. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to obtain pooled effect estimates. Results: The total study population consisted of 367,383 participants, with 9994 deaths from CVD (including 4,992 from ischemic heart disease, 2264 from myocardial infarction, and 2484 from cerebrovascular disease). All hazard ratios were approximately 1.0, except for particle mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality; for PM2.5, the hazard ratio was 1.21 (95% confidence interval = 0.87-1.69) per 5 mu g/m(3) and for PM10, 1.22 (0.91-1.63) per 10 mu g/m(3). Conclusion: In a joint analysis of data from 22 European cohorts, most hazard ratios for the association of air pollutants with mortality from overall CVD and with specific CVDs were approximately 1.0, with the exception of particulate mass and cerebrovascular disease mortality for which there was suggestive evidence for an association.

  • 33. Beishuizen, Cathrien R. L.
    et al.
    Stephan, Blossom C. M.
    van Gool, Willem A.
    Brayne, Carol
    Peters, Ron J. G.
    Andrieu, Sandrine
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Soininen, Hilkka
    Busschers, Wim B.
    van Charante, Eric P. Moll
    Richard, Edo
    Web-Based Interventions Targeting Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Middle-Aged and Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis2016In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, ISSN 1438-8871, E-ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 18, no 3, e55Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Web-based interventions can improve single cardiovascular risk factors in adult populations. In view of global aging and the associated increasing burden of cardiovascular disease, older people form an important target population as well.

    Objective: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we evaluated whether Web-based interventions for cardiovascular risk factor management reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease in older people.

    Methods: Embase, Medline, Cochrane and CINAHL were systematically searched from January 1995 to November 2014. Search terms included cardiovascular risk factors and diseases (specified), Web-based interventions (and synonyms) and randomized controlled trial. Two authors independently performed study selection, data-extraction and risk of bias assessment. In a meta-analysis, outcomes regarding treatment effects on cardiovascular risk factors (blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, smoking status, weight and physical inactivity) and incident cardiovascular disease were pooled with random effects models.

    Results: A total of 57 studies (N=19,862) fulfilled eligibility criteria and 47 studies contributed to the meta-analysis. A significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (mean difference -2.66 mmHg, 95% CI -3.81 to -1.52), diastolic blood pressure (mean difference -1.26 mmHg, 95% CI -1.92 to -0.60), HbA1c level (mean difference -0.13%, 95% CI -0.22 to -0.05), LDL cholesterol level (mean difference -2.18 mg/dL, 95% CI -3.96 to -0.41), weight (mean difference -1.34 kg, 95% CI -1.91 to -0.77), and an increase of physical activity (standardized mean difference 0.25, 95% CI 0.10-0.39) in the Web-based intervention group was found. The observed effects were more pronounced in studies with short (<12 months) follow-up and studies that combined the Internet application with human support (blended care). No difference in incident cardiovascular disease was found between groups (6 studies).

    Conclusions: Web-based interventions have the potential to improve the cardiovascular risk profile of older people, but the effects are modest and decline with time. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for an effect on incident cardiovascular disease. A focus on long-term effects, clinical endpoints, and strategies to increase sustainability of treatment effects is recommended for future studies.

  • 34. Bell, J. Simon
    et al.
    Johnell, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Wimmer, Barbara C.
    Wiese, Michael D.
    Multidose drug dispensing and optimising drug use in older people2013In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 42, no 5, 556-558 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Bellander, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Berggren, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Mårtensson, Johan
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Wenger, Elisabeth
    Li, Tie-Qiang
    Bodammer, Nils C.
    Shing, Yee-Lee
    Werkle-Bergner, Markus
    Lövdén, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Behavioral correlates of changes in hippocampal gray matter structure during acquisition of foreign vocabulary2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 131, 205-213 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience can affect human gray matter volume. The behavioral correlates of individual differences in such brain changes are not well understood. In a group of Swedish individuals studying Italian as a foreign language, we investigated associations among time spent studying, acquired vocabulary, baseline performance on memory tasks, and gray matter changes. As a way of studying episodic memory training, the language learning focused on acquiring foreign vocabulary and lasted for 10 weeks. T-1-weighted structural magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive testing were performed before and after the studies. Learning behavior was monitored via participants' use of a smartphone application dedicated to the study of vocabulary. A whole-brain analysis showed larger changes in gray matter structure of the right hippocampus in the experimental group (N = 33) compared to an active control group (N = 23). A first path analyses revealed that time spent studying rather than acquired knowledge significantly predicted change in gray matter structure. However, this association was not significant when adding performance on baseline memory measures into the model, instead only the participants' performance on a short-term memory task with highly similar distractors predicted the change. This measure may tap similar individual difference factors as those involved in gray matter plasticity of the hippocampus.

  • 36.
    Bellander, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Westerberg, Helena
    Karlsson, Sari
    Fürth, Daniel
    Bergman, Olle
    Eriksson, Elias
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Preliminary evidence that allelic variation in the LMX1A gene influences training-related working memory improvement2011In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 49, no 7, 1938-42 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    LMX1A is a transcription factor involved in the development of dopamine (DA)-producing neurons in midbrain. Previous research has shown that allelic variations in three LMX1A single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were related to risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that these SNPs may influence the number of mesencephalic DA neurons. Prompted by the established link between striatal DA functions and working memory (WM) performance, we examined two of these SNPs in relation to the ability to benefit from 4 weeks of WM training. One SNP (rs4657412) was strongly associated with the magnitude of training-related gains in verbal WM. The allele linked to larger gains has previously been suggested to be associated with higher dopaminergic nerve cell density. No differential gains of either SNP were observed for spatial WM, and the genotype groups were also indistinguishable in tests of attention, interference control, episodic memory, perceptual speed, and reasoning for both SNPs. This pattern of data is in agreement with previous findings from our group, suggesting that cognitive effects of DA-related genes may be more easily detected in a training context than for single-assessment performance scores.

  • 37.
    Bellander, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Liu, Tian
    Schjeide, Brit-Maren M.
    Bertram, Lars
    Schmiedek, Florian
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Lövdén, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Lower baseline performance but greater plasticity of working memory for carriers of the val allele of the comt val158met polymorphism2015In: Neuropsychology, ISSN 0894-4105, E-ISSN 1931-1559, Vol. 29, no 2, 247-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Little is known about genetic contributions to individual differences in cognitive plasticity. Given that the neurotransmitter dopamine is critical for cognition and associated with cognitive plasticity, we investigated the effects of 3 polymorphisms of dopamine-related genes (LMX1A, DRD2, COMT) on baseline performance and plasticity of working memory (WM), perceptual speed, and reasoning. Method: One hundred one younger and 103 older adults underwent approximately 100 days of cognitive training, and extensive testing before and after training. We analyzed the baseline and posttest data using latent change score models. Results: For working memory, carriers of the val allele of the COMT polymorphism had lower baseline performance and larger performance gains from training than carriers of the met allele. There was no significant effect of the other genes or on other cognitive domains. Conclusions: We relate this result to available evidence indicating that met carriers perform better than val carriers in WM tasks taxing maintenance, whereas val carriers perform better at updating tasks. We suggest that val carriers may show larger training gains because updating operations carry greater potential for plasticity than maintenance operations.

  • 38.
    Bellander, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Eschen, Anne
    Lövdén, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Martin, Mike
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    No Evidence for Improved Associative Memory Performance Following Process-Based Associative Memory Training in Older Adults2017In: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, ISSN 1663-4365, E-ISSN 1663-4365, Vol. 8, 326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies attempting to improve episodic memory performance with strategy instructions and training have had limited success in older adults: their training gains are limited in comparison to those of younger adults and do not generalize to untrained tasks and contexts. This limited success has been partly attributed to age-related impairments in associative binding of information into coherent episodes. We therefore investigated potential training and transfer effects of process-based associative memory training (i.e., repeated practice). Thirty-nine older adults (M-age = 68.8) underwent 6 weeks of either adaptive associative memory training or item recognition training. Both groups improved performance in item memory, spatial memory (object-context binding) and reasoning. A disproportionate effect of associative memory training was only observed for item memory, whereas no training-related performance changes were observed for associative memory. Self-reported strategies showed no signs of spontaneous development of memory-enhancing associative memory strategies. Hence, the results do not support the hypothesis that process-based associative memory training leads to higher associative memory performance in older adults.

  • 39. Bennett, Alexander
    et al.
    Gnjidic, Danijela
    Gillett, Mark
    Carroll, Peter
    Matthews, Slade
    Johnell, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Fastbom, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Hilmer, Sarah
    Prevalence and Impact of Fall-Risk-Increasing Drugs, Polypharmacy, and Drug-Drug Interactions in Robust Versus Frail Hospitalised Falls Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study2014In: Drugs & Aging, ISSN 1170-229X, Vol. 31, no 3, 225-232 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Several measures of medication exposure are associated with adverse outcomes in older people. Exposure to and the clinical outcomes of these measures in robust versus frail older inpatients are not known. Objective In older robust and frail patients admitted to hospital after a fall, we investigated the prevalence and clinical impact of fall-risk-increasing drugs (FRIDs), total number of medications, and drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Methods Patients >= 60 years of age admitted with a fall to a tertiary referral teaching hospital in Sydney were recruited and frailty was assessed. Data were collected at admission, discharge, and 2 months after admission. Results A total of 204 patients were recruited (mean age 80.5 +/- 8.3 years), with 101 robust and 103 frail. On admission, compared with the robust, frail participants had significantly higher mean +/- SD number of FRIDs (frail 3.4 +/- 2.2 vs. robust 1.6 +/- 1.5, P < 0.0001), total number of medications (9.8 +/- 4.3 vs. 4.4 +/- 3.3, P < 0.0001), and DDI exposure (35 vs. 5 %, P = 0.001). Number of FRIDs on discharge was significantly associated with recurrent falls [odds ratio (OR) 1.7 (95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.3-2.1)], which were most likely to occur with 1.5 FRIDs in the frail and 2.5 FRIDs in the robust. Number of medications on discharge was also associated with recurrent falls [OR 1.2 (1.0-1.3)], but DDIs were not. Conclusion Exposure to FRIDs and other measures of high-risk medication exposures is common in older people admitted with falls, especially the frail. Number of FRIDs and to a lesser extent total number of medicines at discharge were associated with recurrent falls.

  • 40.
    Berndt, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Fors, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Childhood living conditions, education and health among the oldest old in Sweden2016In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 36, no 3, 631-648 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives were to investigate the associations between social and financial living conditions in childhood, education and morbidity in old age. The study population (N = 591; 76+ years old) was assembled from two nationally representative Swedish surveys, in 1968 and 2011, that together made longitudinal analysis possible. Morbidity in old age comprised self-reported measures of musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disease, self-rated health and impaired mobility. There were no independent associations between adverse childhood living conditions and morbidity. However, adverse childhood living conditions were associated with an increased likelihood of low education. Moreover, low education was associated with a higher probability of health problems in old age. The results did not show any associations between adverse childhood conditions and late-life morbidity. However, adverse childhood conditions were associated with lower levels of education which, in turn, was associated with health problems and attrition from the study. These results suggest that adverse childhood conditions may indeed be associated with health and survival in old age, but mainly through mechanisms acting earlier in the lifecourse.

  • 41. Berner, Jessica
    et al.
    Rennemark, Mikael
    Jogréus, Claes
    Anderberg, Peter
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Wahlberg, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Berglund, Johan
    Factors influencing Internet usage in older adults (65 years and above) living in rural and urban Sweden2015In: Health Informatics Journal, ISSN 1460-4582, E-ISSN 1741-2811, Vol. 21, no 3, 237-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older adults living in rural and urban areas have shown to distinguish themselves in technology adoption; a clearer profile of their Internet use is important in order to provide better technological and health-care solutions. Older adults' Internet use was investigated across large to midsize cities and rural Sweden. The sample consisted of 7181 older adults ranging from 59 to 100 years old. Internet use was investigated with age, education, gender, household economy, cognition, living alone/or with someone and rural/urban living. Logistic regression was used. Those living in rural areas used the Internet less than their urban counterparts. Being younger and higher educated influenced Internet use; for older urban adults, these factors as well as living with someone and having good cognitive functioning were influential. Solutions are needed to avoid the exclusion of some older adults by a society that is today being shaped by the Internet.

  • 42. Besga, A.
    et al.
    Cedazo-Minguez, A.
    Kåreholt, I.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Solomon, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Björkhem, I.
    Winblad, B.
    Leoni, V.
    Hooshmand, B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Spulber, G.
    Gonzalez-Pinto, A.
    Kivipelto, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Wahlund, L. O.
    Differences in brain cholesterol metabolism and insulin in two subgroups of patients with different CSF biomarkers but similar white matter lesions suggest different pathogenic mechanisms2012In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 510, no 2, 121-126 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Investigate possible associations of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) with the metabolism of cholesterol and insulin in two subgroups of patients with memory complaints and different CSF A beta 42 and CSF tau levels. 59 patients from the memory clinic at Karolinska Hospital were included. Degree of WMHs was rated using the ARWMC scale and the following biomarkers were measured in CSF and plasma: insulin, cholesterol, lanosterol, lathosterol, and oxidized cholesterol metabolites. The WMHs in CSF control-like group correlated with increased brain cholesterol synthesis and reduced efflux of oxysterols and insulin in CSF. In the CSF AD-like group, the WMHs correlated with increased peripheral cholesterol metabolism. Despite having similar appearance on FLAIR images, the pathogenic mechanisms of WMHS are likely to be different in the two groups investigated.

  • 43. Boraxbekk, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Lundquist, Anders
    Nordin, Annelie
    Nyberg, Lars
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Free Recall Episodic Memory Performance Predicts Dementia Ten Years prior to Clinical Diagnosis: Findings from the Betula Longitudinal Study2015In: Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, E-ISSN 1664-5464, Vol. 5, no 2, 191-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background/Aims: Early dementia diagnosis is a considerable challenge. The present study examined the predictive value of cognitive performance for a future clinical diagnosis of late-onset Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia in a random population sample. Methods: Cognitive performance was retrospectively compared between three groups of participants from the Betula longitudinal cohort. Group 1 developed dementia 11-22 years after baseline testing (n = 111) and group 2 after 1-10 years (n = 280); group 3 showed no deterioration towards dementia during the study period (n = 2,855). Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the predictive value of tests reflecting episodic memory performance, semantic memory performance, visuospatial ability, and prospective memory performance. Results: Age-and education-corrected performance on two free recall episodic memory tests significantly predicted dementia 10 years prior to clinical diagnosis. Free recall performance also predicted dementia 11-22 years prior to diagnosis when controlling for education, but not when age was added to the model. Conclusion: The present results support the suggestion that two free recall-based tests of episodic memory function may be useful for detecting individuals at risk of developing dementia 10 years prior to clinical diagnosis.

  • 44.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Kalpouzos, Gregoria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Wenger, Elisabeth
    Lövdén, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Plasticity of brain and cognition in older adults2014In: Psychological Research, ISSN 0340-0727, E-ISSN 1430-2772, Vol. 78, no 6, 790-802 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging is typically related to changes in brain and cognition, but the aging process is heterogeneous and differs between individuals. Recent research has started investigating the influence of cognitive and physical training on cognitive performance, functional brain activity, and brain structure in old age. The functional relevance of neural changes and the interactions among these changes following interventions is still a matter of debate. Here we selectively review research on structural and functional brain correlates of training-induced performance changes in healthy older adults and present exemplary longitudinal intervention studies sorted by the type of training applied (i.e., strategy-based training, process-specific training, and physical exercise). Although many training studies have been conducted recently, within each task domain, the number of studies that used comparable methods and techniques to assess behavioral and neural changes is limited. We suggest that future studies should include a multimodal approach to enhance the understanding of the relation between different levels of brain changes in aging and those changes that result from training. Investigating inter-individual differences in intervention-induced behavioral and neuronal changes would provide more information about who would benefit from a specific intervention and why. In addition, a more systematic examination of the time course of training-related structural and functional changes would improve the current level of knowledge about how learning is implemented in the brain and facilitate our understanding of contradictory results.

  • 45.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Bellander, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Westerberg, Helena
    Fischer, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Neural correlates of training-related working-memory gains in old age2011In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 58, no 4, 1110-1120 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory (WM) functioning declines in old age. Due to its impact on many higher-order cognitive functions, investigating whether training can modify WM performance has recently been of great interest. We examined the relationship between behavioral performance and neural activity following five weeks of intensive WM training in 23 healthy older adults (M = 63.7 years). 12 participants received adaptive training (i.e. individually adjusted task difficulty to bring individuals to their performance maximum), whereas the others served as active controls (i.e. fixed low-level practice). Brain activity was measured before and after training, using fMRI, while subjects performed a WM task under two difficulty conditions. Although there were no training-related changes in WM during scanning, neocortical brain activity decreased post training and these decreases were larger in the adaptive training group than in the controls under high WM load. This pattern suggests intervention-related increases in neural efficiency. Further, there were disproportionate gains in the adaptive training group in trained as well as in non-trained (i.e. attention, episodic memory) tasks assessed outside the scanner, indicating the efficacy of the training regimen. Critically, the degree of training-related changes in brain activity (i.e. neocortical decreases and subcortical increases) was related to the maximum gain score achieved during the intervention period. This relationship suggests that the decreased activity, but also specific activity increases, observed were functionally relevant.

  • 46.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Germany.
    Shing, Yee Lee
    Heekeren, Hauke R.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Training-induced changes in subsequent-memory effects: No major differences among children, younger adults, and older adults2016In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 131, 214-225 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neural correlates of encoding mode, or the state of forming new memory episodes, have been found to change with age and mnemonic training. However, it is unclear whether neural correlates of encoding success, termed subsequent-memory (SM) effects, also differ by age and mnemonic skill. In a multi-session training study, we investigated whether SM effects are altered by instruction and training in a mnemonic skill, and whether such alterations differ among children, younger adults, and older adults. Before and after strategy training, fMRI data were collected while participants were memorizing word pairs. In all age groups, participants receiving training showed greater performance gains than control group participants. Analysis of task-relevant regions showed training-induced reductions in SM effects in left frontal regions. Reductions in SM effects largely generalized across age and primarily reflected greater training-induced activation increases for omissions than for remembered items, indicating that training resulted in more consistent use of the mnemonic strategy. The present results reveal no major age differences in SM effects in children, younger adults, and older adults.

  • 47.
    Brehmer, Yvonne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Westerberg, Helena
    Bäckman, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Working-memory training in younger and older adults: training gains, transfer, and maintenance2012In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5161, Vol. 6, no 63, 1-7 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working memory (WM), a key determinant of many higher-order cognitive functions, declines in old age. Current research attempts to develop process-specific WM training procedures, which may lead to general cognitive improvement. Adaptivity of the training as well as the comparison of training gains to performance changes of an active control group are key factors in evaluating the effectiveness of a specific training program. In the present study, 55 younger adults (20–30 years of age) and 45 older adults (60–70 years of age) received 5 weeks of computerized training on various spatial and verbal WM tasks. Half of the sample received adaptive training (i.e., individually adjusted task difficulty), whereas the other half-worked on the same task material but on a low task difficulty level (active controls). Performance was assessed using criterion, near-transfer, and far-transfer tasks before training, after 5 weeks of intervention, as well as after a 3-month follow-up interval. Results indicate that (a) adaptive training generally led to larger training gains than low-level practice, (b) training and transfer gains were somewhat greater for younger than for older adults in some tasks, but comparable across age groups in other tasks, (c) far-transfer was observed to a test on sustained attention and for a self-rating scale on cognitive functioning in daily life for both young and old, and (d) training gains and transfer effects were maintained across the 3-month follow-up interval across age.

  • 48. Broda, Anja
    et al.
    Bieber, Anja
    Meyer, Gabriele
    Hopper, Louise
    Joyce, Rachael
    Irving, Kate
    Zanetti, Orazio
    Portolani, Elisa
    Kerpershoek, Liselot
    Verhey, Frans
    de Vugt, Marjolein
    Wolfs, Claire
    Eriksen, Siren
    Rosvik, Janne
    Marques, Maria J.
    Goncalves-Pereira, Manuel
    Sjölund, Britt-Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Woods, Bob
    Jelley, Hannah
    Orrell, Martin
    Stephan, Astrid
    Perspectives of policy and political decision makers on access to formal dementia care: expert interviews in eight European countries2017In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 17, 518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As part of the ActifCare (ACcess to Timely Formal Care) project, we conducted expert interviews in eight European countries with policy and political decision makers, or representatives of relevant institutions, to determine their perspectives on access to formal care for people with dementia and their carers. Methods: Each ActifCare country (Germany, Ireland, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, United Kingdom) conducted semi-structured interviews with 4-7 experts (total N = 38). The interview guide addressed the topics Complexity and Continuity of Care, Formal Services, and Public Awareness. Country-specific analysis of interview transcripts used an inductive qualitative content analysis. Cross-national synthesis focused on similarities in themes across the ActifCare countries. Results: The analysis revealed ten common themes and two additional sub-themes across countries. Among others, the experts highlighted the need for a coordinating role and the necessity of information to address issues of complexity and continuity of care, demanded person-centred, tailored, and multidisciplinary formal services, and referred to education, mass media and campaigns as means to raise public awareness. Conclusions: Policy and political decision makers appear well acquainted with current discussions among both researchers and practitioners of possible approaches to improve access to dementia care. Experts described pragmatic, realistic strategies to influence dementia care. Suggested innovations concerned how to achieve improved dementia care, rather than transforming the nature of the services provided. Knowledge gained in these expert interviews may be useful to national decision makers when they consider reshaping the organisation of dementia care, and may thus help to develop best-practice strategies and recommendations.

  • 49. Brodaty, Henry
    et al.
    Breteler, Monique M.B.
    DeKoshy, Steven T.
    Dorenlot, Pascale
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Hock, Christoph
    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel
    Scheltens, Philip
    de Strooper, Bart
    The World of Dementia Beyond 20202011In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 59, no 5, 923-927 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Counterpoised against dire projections of the tripling of the prevalence of dementia over the next 40 years are major developments in diagnostic biomarkers, neuroimaging, the molecular biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), epidemiology of risk and protective factors, and drug treatments—mainly targeting the amyloid pathway, tau protein, and immunotherapy—that may have the potential to modify the progression of AD. Drug combinations and presymptomatic treatments are also being investigated. Previous trials of dementia-modifying drugs have not shown benefit, and even if current Phase III trials prove successful, these drugs will not eradicate other dementias, could (if not curative) increase dementia duration and prevalence, and are unlikely to come onto the market before 2020. In the meantime, delaying the onset of dementia by even 2 years would have significant economic and societal effects. This article provides an overview of current achievements and potentials of basic and clinical research that might affect the development of dementia prevalence and care within the near future.

  • 50. Brose, Annette
    et al.
    Lovden, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Schmiedek, Florian
    Daily Fluctuations in Positive Affect Positively Co-Vary With Working Memory Performance2014In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 14, no 1, 1-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Positive affect is related to cognitive performance in multiple ways. It is associated with motivational aspects of performance, affective states capture attention, and information processing modes are a function of affect. In this study, we examined whether these links are relevant within individuals across time when they experience minor ups and downs of positive affect and work on cognitive tasks in the laboratory on a day-to-day basis. Using a microlongitudinal design, 101 younger adults (20-31 years of age) worked on 3 working memory tasks on about 100 occasions. Every day, they also reported on their momentary affect and their motivation to work on the tasks. In 2 of the 3 tasks, performance was enhanced on days when positive affect was above average. This performance enhancement was also associated with more motivation. Importantly, increases in task performance on days with above-average positive affect were mainly unrelated to variations in negative affect. This study's results are in line with between-person findings suggesting that high levels of well-being are associated with successful outcomes. They imply that success on cognitively demanding tasks is more likely on days when feeling happier.

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