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  • 1. Abbas, Sk Jahir
    et al.
    Ramacharyulu, P. V. R. K.
    Lo, Hsin-Hsi
    Ali, Sk Imran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ke, Shyue-Chu
    A catalytic approach to synthesis of PLP analogs and other environmental protocols in a single handed CaO/TiO2 green nanoparticle2017In: Applied Catalysis B: Environmental, ISSN 0926-3373, E-ISSN 1873-3883, Vol. 210, 276-289 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As our precursory stage we have focus straight forward on clean catalytic approach for the production of C3 substituted pyridoxal-5 '-phosphate analogues of vitamin B6, and other environmental protocols like photocatalytic activity, green fossil fuels and c-c coupling using efficient biocompatible eggshell related unrivalled materials which show versatility of the catalytic effect on different inorganic support. The eggshell immobilized nanoparticles have encouraging relevance in creation of new molecules and can advantageously be studied by various spectroscopic, thermal and elemental analyses like powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area analysis. The elucidate nature of nanoparticles offer: more active site acts as lewis acid, vacancies on the catalyst surface and good to better yield of C3 substituted deoxy and 2-nor deoxy coenzyme pyridoxine (PN), coupling products propargylamines (PA), photo degrading enhancement of MB and nucleophilic substituted fatty acid (BD). This enzyme cofactor explore molecular synthons to synthetic equivalent: 3-deoxy and 2-nor-3-deoxy pyridoxal (PL), pyridoxal oxime (P0), pyridoxamine (PM) and mono phosphate derivative of 3-deoxyPM, 3-deoxyPL respectively and chemistry of selective oxidation and schiff base mechanism was studied and complemented through combined experimental and theoretical molecular orbital calculation consequently. The heterogeneous catalyst has strong selective ability towards selective reducing pyridine diester, bioactive intermediates substances and holds vast potential towards separation for the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and renewable, nontoxic, biodegradable green fossil fuels. The catalyst including environmental concern is reapplicable and strong impressive that can unfold the space of worthy metal component widely and facilitate the scope to take a vital role in different fileds like catalysis, biochemistry, nanoscience, energy and materials science.

  • 2. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Badiei, Alireza
    Khaniani, Yeganeh
    Golchoubian, Hamid
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    N,N '-bis(2,6-dichlorobenzyl)ethylene-diimine2007In: Acta Crystallographica Section E: Structure Reports Online, ISSN 1600-5368, E-ISSN 1600-5368, Vol. 63, o3773-U2712 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the centrosymmetric title compound, C16H12Cl4N2, the asymmetric unit is one half-molecule. Weak van der Waals interactions between the molecules are effective in the molecular packing. This is the first reported structure of a chloro-substituted benzaldehyde derivative that can potentially form a tetradentate ligand.

  • 3. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Damian Risberg, Emiliana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical, Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Mink, Janos
    Persson, Ingmar
    Sandström, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Sidorov, Yurii V.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Ullström, Ann-Sofi
    Crystallographic and Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Octakis(dimethyl sulfoxide)lanthanoid(III) Iodides2007In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 46, no 19, 7731-7741 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The octakis(DMSO) (DMSO = dimethylsulfoxide) neodymium(III), samarium(III), gadolinium(III), dysprosium(III), erbium(III), and lutetium(III) iodides crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n (No. 14) with Z = 4, while the octakis(DMSO) iodides of the larger lanthanum(III), cerium(III), and praseodymium(III) ions crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (No. 61), Z = 8. In all [Ln(OS(Me2)8]I3 compounds the lanthanoid(III) ions coordinate eight DMSO oxygen atoms in a distorted square antiprism. Up to three of the DMSO ligands were found to be disordered and were described by two alternative configurations related by a twist around the metal−oxygen (Ln−O) bond. To resolve the atomic positions and achieve reliable Ln−O bond distances, complete semirigid DMSO molecules with restrained geometry and partial occupancy were refined for the alternative sites. This disorder model was also applied on previously collected data for the monoclinic octakis(DMSO)yttrium(III) iodide. At ambient temperature, the eight Ln−O bond distances are distributed over a range of about 0.1 Å. The average value increases from Ln−O 2.30, 2.34, 2.34, 2.36, 2.38, 2.40 to 2.43 Å (Ln = Lu, Er, Y, Dy, Gd, Sm, and Nd) for the monoclinic [Ln(OSMe2)8]I3 structures, and from 2.44, 2.47 to 2.49 Å (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) for the orthorhombic structures, respectively. The average of the La−O and Nd−O bond distances remained unchanged at 100 K, 2.49 and 2.43 Å, respectively. Despite longer bond distances and larger Ln−O−S angles, the cell volumes are smaller for the orthorhombic structures (Ln = Pr, Ce, and La) than for the monoclinic structure with Ln = Nd, showing a more efficient packing arrangement. Raman and IR absorption spectra for the [Ln(OS(CH3)2)8]I3 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Lu, and Y) compounds, also deuterated for La and Y, have been recorded and analyzed by means of normal coordinate methods. The force constants for the Ln−O and S−O stretching modes in the complexes increase with decreasing Ln−O bond distance and show increasing polarization of the bonds for the smaller and heavier lanthanoid(III) ions.

  • 4. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Geranmayeh, Shokoofeh
    Skripkin, Mikhail Y.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Potassium ion-mediated non-covalent bonded coordination polymers2012In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 41, no 3, 850-859 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crystal structures and vibrational spectra of three related network-forming coordination complexes have been studied. Two novel thermodynamically stable pseudo-polymorphic solvated rhodium chloro compounds, [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K](n), 1, and [cis-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 3H(2)O](n), 2, and one metastable compound [trans-RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)K center dot 0.25H(2)O](n), 3, crystallize at ambient temperature in the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) for 1, and the monoclinic space groups P2(1)/n and P2(1)/c for 2 and 3, respectively. All three structures contain [RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)]-complexes in which the rhodium(III) ions bind to two dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) sulfur atoms and four chloride ions in distorted octahedral coordination geometries. The complexes are connected in networks via potassium ions interacting with the Cl- and the DMSO oxygen atoms. As the sum of Shannon ionic radii of K+ and Cl- exceeds the K-Cl distances in compounds under study, these compounds can be described as Rh-Cl-K coordination polymers with non-covalent bonding, which is not common in these systems, forming 1- and 2-D networks for 1/2 and 3, respectively. The 2-D network with nano-layered sheets for compound 3 was also confirmed by TEM images. Further evaluation of the bonding in the cis- and trans-[RhCl4(DMSO-kappa S)(2)](-) entities was obtained by recording Raman and FT-IR absorption spectra and assigning the vibrational frequencies with the support of force-field calculations. The force field study of complexes reveals the strong domination of trans-effect (DMSO-kappa S > Cl) over the effect of non-covalent bonding in coordination polymeric structures. The comparison of calculated RhCl, RhS and SO stretching force constants showed evidence of K+-ligand interactions whereas direct experimental evidences of K+-Cl- interaction were not obtained because of strong overlap of the corresponding spectral region with that where lattice modes and Rh-ligand bendings appear.

  • 5. Abbasi, Alireza
    et al.
    Skripkin, Mikhail Yu.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Torapava, Natallia
    Ambidentate coordination of dimethyl sulfoxide in rhodium(III) complexes2011In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 40, no 5, 1111-1118 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The two dimethyl sulfoxide solvated rhodium(III) compounds, [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(5)(dmso-kappa S)](CF(3)SO(3))(3) (1 & 1* at 298 K and 100 K, respectively) and [Rh(dmso-kappa O)(3)(dmso-kappa S)(2)Cl](CF(3)SO(3))(2) (2), crystallize with orthorhombic unit cells in the space group Pna2(1) (No. 33), Z = 4. In the [Rh(dmso)(6)](3+) complex with slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry, the Rh-O bond distance is significantly longer with O trans to S, 2.143(6) angstrom (1) and 2.100(6) angstrom (1*), than the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to O, 2.019 angstrom (1) and 2.043 angstrom (1*). In the [RhCl(dmso)(5)](3+) complex, the mean Rh-O bond distance with O trans to S, 2.083 angstrom, is slightly longer than that for O trans to Cl, 2.067(4) angstrom, which is consistent with the trans influence DMSO-kappa S > Cl > DMSO-kappa O of the opposite ligands. Raman and IR absorption spectra were recorded and analyzed and a complete assignment of the vibrational bands was achieved with support by force field calculations. An increase in the Rh-O stretching vibrational frequency corresponded to a decreasing trans-influence from the opposite ligand. The Rh-O force constants obtained were correlated with the Rh-O bond lengths, also including previously obtained values for other M(dmso)(6)(3+) complexes with trivalent metal ions. An almost linear correlation was obtained for the MO stretching force constants vs. the reciprocal square of the MO bond lengths. The results show that the metal ion-oxygen bonding of dimethyl sulfoxide ligands is electrostatically dominated in those complexes and that the stretching force constants provide a useful measure of the relative trans-influence of the opposite ligands in hexa-coordinated Rh(III)-complexes.

  • 6.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lanthanide Metal-Organic Frameworks and Hierarchical Porous Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks: Synthesis, Properties, and Applications2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis presents the synthesis, properties, and applications of two important classes of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs); lanthanide MOFs and hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs). The materials have been characterized using a wide range of techniques including diffraction, imaging, various spectroscopic techniques, gas sorption, dynamical light scattering (DLS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    In Chapter 1, the unique features of MOFs and ZIFs as well as their potential applications are summarized. In Chapter 2, different characterization techniques are presented.

    Chapter 3 describes a family of new isoreticular lanthanide MOFs synthesized using tri-topic linkers of different sizes, H3L1-H3L4, denoted SUMOF-7I-IV (Ln) (SU; Stockholm University, Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd, Paper I). The SUMOF-7I-III (Ln) contain permanent pores and exhibit exceptionally high thermal and chemical stability. The luminescence properties of SUMOF-7IIs are reported (Paper II). The influences of Ln ions and the tri-topic linkers as well as solvent molecules on the luminescence properties are investigated. Furthermore, the potential of SUMOF-7II (La) for selective sensing of Fe (III) ions and the amino acid tryptophan is demonstrated (Paper III). 

    Chapter 4 presents a simple, fast and scalable approach for the synthesis of hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 using triethylamine (TEA)-assisted approach (Paper IV). Organic dye molecules and proteins are encapsulated directly into the ZIFs using the one-pot method. The photophysical properties of the dyes are improved through the encapsulation into ZIF-8 nanoparticles (Paper IV). The porosity and surface area of the ZIF materials can be tuned using the different amounts of dye or TEA. To further simplify the synthesis of hierarchical porous ZIF-8, a template-free approach is presented using sodium hydroxide, which at low concentrations induces the formation of zinc hydroxide nitrate nanosheets that serve as in situ sacrificial templates (Chapter 5, Paper V). A 2D leaf-like ZIF (ZIF-L) is also obtained using the method. The hierarchical porous ZIF-8 and ZIF-L show good performance for CO2 sorption.

  • 7.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bermejo-Gómez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A water-stable lanthanide metal-organic framework for fluorimetric detection of ferric ions and tryptophan2017In: Microchimica Acta, ISSN 0026-3672, E-ISSN 1436-5073, Vol. 184, no 9, 3363-3371 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The preparation of a highly water stable and porous lanthanide metal-organic framework (MOF) nanoparticles (denoted SUMOF-7II; SU refers to Stockholm University) is described. SUMOF-7II was synthesized starting from the tritopic linker of 2,4,6-tri-p-carboxyphenyl pyridine (H3L2) and La(III) as metal clusters. SUMOF-7II forms a stable dispersion and displays high fluorescence emission with small variation over the pH range of 6 to 12. Its fluorescence is selectively quenched by Fe(III) ions compared to other metal ions. The intensity of the fluorescene emission drops drops linearly in 16.6–167 μM Fe(III) concentration range, and Stern-Volmer plots are linear. The limit of detection (LOD) is 16.6 μM (at an S/N ratio of >3). This indicator probe can also be used for selective detection of tryptophan among several amino acids. Compared to the free linker H3L2, SUMOF-7II offers improved sensitivity and selectivity of the investigated species.

  • 8.
    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Huang, Zhehao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    El-Zhory, Ahmed M.
    Haoquan, Zheng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A Fast and Scalable Approach for Synthesis of Hierarchical Porous Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks and One-Pot Encapsulation of Target Molecules2017In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 56, no 15, 9139-9146 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A trimethylamine (TEA)-assisted synthesis approach that combines the preparation of hierarchical porous zeolitic imidazolate framework ZIF-8 nanoparticles and one-pot encapsulation of target molecules is presented. Two dye molecules, rhodamine B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB), and one protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) were tested as the target molecules. The addition of TEA into the solution of zinc nitrate promoted the formation of ZnO nanocrystals, which rapidly transformed to ZIF-8 nanoparticles after the addition of the linker 2-methylimidazole (Hmim). Hierarchical porous dye@ZIF-8 nanoparticles with high crystallinity, large BET surface areas (1300–2500 m2/g), and large pore volumes (0.5–1.0 cm3/g) could be synthesized. The synthesis procedure was fast (down to 2 min) and scalable. The Hmim/Zn ratio could be greatly reduced (down to 2:1) compared to previously reported ones. The surface areas, and the mesopore size, structure, and density could be modified by changing the TEA or dye concentrations, or by postsynthetic treatment using reflux in methanol. This synthesis and one-pot encapsulation approach is simple and can be readily scaled up. The photophysical properties such as lifetime and photostability of the dyes could be tuned via encapsulation. The lifetimes of the encapsulated dyes were increased by 3–27-fold for RhB@ZIF-8 and by 20-fold for MB@ZIF-8, compared to those of the corresponding free dyes. The synthesis approach is general, which was successfully applied for encapsulation of protein BSA. It could also be extended for the synthesis of hierarchical porous cobalt-based ZIF (dye@ZIF-67).

  • 9.
    Abdelhamid, Hani
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wilk-Kozubek, Magdalena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ahmed, M. El-Zohry
    Valiente, Alejandro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Bermejo-Gomez, Antonio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Martín-Matute, Belén
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mudring, Anja-Verena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Luminescence Properties for a Family of Highly Stable Lanthanide Metal-Organic FrameworksManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Abdelhamid, Hani
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Zou, Xiaodong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Template-Free Synthesis of Hierarchical Porous Zeolitic Imidazole Frameworks Nanoparticles and their CO2 SorptionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 11. Abdullah, Omed Gh.
    et al.
    Tahir, Dana A.
    Kadir, K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Kurdistan Institution for Strategic Studies and Scientific Research, Iraq.
    Optical and structural investigation of synthesized PVA/PbS nanocomposites2015In: Journal of materials science. Materials in electronics, ISSN 0957-4522, E-ISSN 1573-482X, Vol. 26, no 9, 6939-6944 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymer nanocomposite based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and lead sulfide (PbS) in the average radius of (1.88-2.23) nm, have been synthesized using the chemical reduction rote and solution casting technique for different concentrations of PbS. The characterization of the polymer nanocomposite films were carried out using UV-visible spectroscopy, SEM, and XRD. The effect of various concentration of PbS NP on the optical properties of the composite has been studied to understand the optimum conditions for the synthesis process. The nanocomposite film shows high UV and visible light absorptions in the wavelength range of (200-500) nm, which correspond to the characteristics of the PbS NPs. The significant decreasing trend of the direct allowed band gap of the nanocomposite was observed upon increasing the Pb source concentration, from (6.27 eV) for pure PVA to (2.34 eV) for 0.04 M PbS concentration, which is much higher than the energy gap of bulk PbS value (0.41 eV). The calculated values of the static refractive index of Cauchy dispersion model were in the range of (1.09-1.20). X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the cubic nanocrystalline PbS phase formation.

  • 12.
    Abebe, Mihret
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bacsik, Zoltan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Spherical and Porous Particles of Calcium Carbonate Synthesized with Food Friendly Polymer Additives2015In: Crystal Growth & Design, ISSN 1528-7483, E-ISSN 1528-7505, Vol. 15, no 8, 3609-3616 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porous calcium carbonate particles were synthesized by adding solutions of Ca2+ to solutions of CO32- containing polymeric additives. Under optimized conditions well-defined aggregates of the anhydrous polymorph vaterite formed. A typical sample of these micrometer-sized aggregates had: a pore volume of 0.1 cm(3)/g, a pore width of similar to 10 nm, and a specific surface area of similar to 25-30 m(2)/ g. Only one mixing Order (calcium to carbonate) allowed the formation of vaterite, which was ascribed to the buffering capacity and relatively high pH of the CO32- solution. Rapid addition of the calcium chloride solution and rapid stirring promoted the formation of vaterite, due to the high supersaturation levels achieved. With xanthan gum, porous and micrometer-sized vaterite aggregates could be synthesized over a wide range of synthetic conditions. For the Other food grade polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), methylcellulose (MC), and sodium carboxyl methylcellulose, several intensive and extensive synthetic parameters had to be optimized to obtain pure vaterite and porous aggregates. HPMC and MC allowed well-defined spherical micrometer-sited particles to form. We expect that these spherical and porous particles of vaterite could be relevant to model studies as well as a controlled delivery of particularly large molecules.

  • 13. Achari, Muthuraaman Bhagavathi
    et al.
    Elumalai, Viswanathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Vlachopoulos, Nick
    Safdari, Majid
    Gao, Jiajia
    Gardner, James M.
    Kloo, Lars
    A quasi-liquid polymer-based cobalt redox mediator electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells2013In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 15, no 40, 17419-17425 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, cobalt redox electrolyte mediators have emerged as a promising alternative to the commonly used iodide/triiodide redox shuttle in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Here, we report the successful use of a new quasi-liquid, polymer-based electrolyte containing the Co3+/Co2+ redox mediator in 3-methoxy propionitrile solvent in order to overcome the limitations of high cell resistance, low diffusion coefficient and rapid recombination losses. The performance of the solar cells containing the polymer based electrolytes increased by a factor of 1.2 with respect to an analogous electrolyte without the polymer. The performances of the fabricated DSCs have been investigated in detail by photovoltaic, transient electron measurements, EIS, Raman and UV-vis spectroscopy. This approach offers an effective way to make high-performance and long-lasting DSCs.

  • 14. Adolfsson, Erik
    et al.
    Shen, Zhijian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Effects of granule density on strength and granule related defects in zirconia2012In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, Vol. 32, no 11, 2653-2659 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A suspension of zirconia powder (TZ3YSE) with a solids loading of 50 vol% was prepared by ball milling. Binders were added and some of the suspension was diluted to 40, 30 and 20 vol% before freeze granulation was performed. A spray dried material (TZ3YSEB) was used as a reference. The pore size distribution of the different granules was evaluated and from the microstructure it was shown that inhomogeneities were present in both the freeze granulated as well as in the spray dried granules. In addition, the density, microstructure as well as the strength of sintered materials prepared from the granules were studied. The results showed that a high green density or sintered density was not sufficient in order to achieve a high strength material. It was further shown that the strength was significantly influenced by the granule density and not by the inhomogeneities found in the granules.

  • 15.
    Afewerki, Samson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    Ma, Guangning
    Ibrahem, Ismail
    Liu, Leifeng
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sun, Junliang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Córdova, Armando
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Mid-Sweden University, Sweden.
    Highly Enantioselective Control of Dynamic Cascade Transformations by Dual Catalysis: Asymmetric Synthesis of Polysubstituted Spirocyclic Oxindoles2015In: ACS Catalysis, ISSN 2155-5435, Vol. 5, no 2, 1266-1272 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly enantioselective (up to >99.5:0.5 er) synthesis of polysubstituted spirocyclic oxindoles with four new contiguous stereocenters, including the spiro all-carbon quaternary center, is disclosed. It is accomplished by the highly stereoselective control of a dynamic conjugate/intramolecular allylic alkylation relay sequence based on the synergistic cooperation of metal and chiral amine catalysts in which the careful selection of organic Nand, metal complex, and chiral amine is essential. The intermolecular C-C bond-forming step occurred only when both the metal and chiral amine catalysts were present.

  • 16. Afzal, Muhammad
    et al.
    Saleemi, Mohsin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Wang, Baoyuan
    Xia, Chen
    Zhang, Wei
    He, Yunjuan
    Jayasuriya, Jeevan
    Zhu, Bin
    Fabrication of novel electrolyte-layer free fuel cell with semi-ionic conductor (Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta- Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9) and Schottky barrier2016In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 328, 136-142 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Perovskite Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-delta (BSCF) is synthesized via a chemical co-precipitation technique for a low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC) (300-600 degrees C) and electrolyte-layer free fuel cell (EFFC) in a comprehensive study. The EFFC with a homogeneous mixture of samarium doped ceria (SDC): BSCF (60%:40% by weight) which is rather similar to the cathode (SDC: BSCF in 50%:50% by weight) used for a three layer SOFC demonstrates peak power densities up to 655 mW/cm(2), while a three layer (anode/ electrolyte/cathode) SOFC has reached only 425 mW/cm(2) at 550 degrees C. Chemical phase, crystal structure and morphology of the as-prepared sample are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The electrochemical performances of 3-layer SOFC and EFFC are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As-prepared BSCF has exhibited a maximum conductivity above 300 S/cm at 550 degrees C. High performance of the EFFC device corresponds to a balanced combination between ionic and electronic (holes) conduction characteristic. The Schottky barrier prevents the EFFC from the electronic short circuiting problem which also enhances power output. The results provide a new way to produce highly effective cathode materials for LTSOFC and semiconductor designs for EFFC functions using a semiconducting-ionic material.

  • 17.
    Agosta, Lorenzo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brandt, Erik G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Diffusion and reaction pathways of water near fully hydrated TiO2 surfaces from ab initio molecular dynamics2017In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 147, no 2, 024704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are reported forwater-embedded TiO2 surfaces to determine the diffusive and reactive behavior at full hydration. A three-domain model is developed for six surfaces [rutile (110), (100), and (001), and anatase (101), (100), and (001)] which describes waters as hard (irreversibly bound to the surface), soft (with reduced mobility but orientation freedom near the surface), or bulk. The model explains previous experimental data and provides a detailed picture of water diffusion near TiO2 surfaces. Water reactivity is analyzed with a graph-theoretic approach that reveals a number of reaction pathways on TiO2 which occur at full hydration, in addition to direct water splitting. Hydronium (H3O+) is identified to be a key intermediate state, which facilitates water dissociation by proton hopping between intact and dissociated waters near the surfaces. These discoveries significantly improve the understanding of nanoscale water dynamics and reactivity at TiO2 interfaces under ambient conditions.

  • 18.
    Agthe, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Crystallization on the Mesoscale: Self-Assembly of Iron Oxide Nanocubes into Mesocrystals2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-assembly of nanoparticles is a promising route to form complex, nanostructured materials with functional properties. Nanoparticle assemblies characterized by a crystallographic alignment of the nanoparticles on the atomic scale, i.e. mesocrystals, are commonly found in nature with outstanding functional and mechanical properties. This thesis aims to investigate and understand the formation mechanisms of mesocrystals formed by self-assembling iron oxide nanocubes.

    We have used the thermal decomposition method to synthesize monodisperse, oleate-capped iron oxide nanocubes with average edge lengths between 7 nm and 12 nm and studied the evaporation-induced self-assembly in dilute toluene-based nanocube dispersions. The influence of packing constraints on the alignment of the nanocubes in nanofluidic containers has been investigated with small and wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS, respectively). We found that the nanocubes preferentially orient one of their {100} faces with the confining channel wall and display mesocrystalline alignment irrespective of the channel widths. 

    We manipulated the solvent evaporation rate of drop-cast dispersions on fluorosilane-functionalized silica substrates in a custom-designed cell. The growth stages of the assembly process were investigated using light microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). We found that particle transport phenomena, e.g. the coffee ring effect and Marangoni flow, result in complex-shaped arrays near the three-phase contact line of a drying colloidal drop when the nitrogen flow rate is high. Diffusion-driven nanoparticle assembly into large mesocrystals with a well-defined morphology dominates at much lower nitrogen flow rates. Analysis of the time-resolved video microscopy data was used to quantify the mesocrystal growth and establish a particle diffusion-based, three-dimensional growth model. The dissipation obtained from the QCM-D signal reached its maximum value when the microscopy-observed lateral growth of the mesocrystals ceased, which we address to the fluid-like behavior of the mesocrystals and their weak binding to the substrate. Analysis of electron microscopy images and diffraction patterns showed that the formed arrays display significant nanoparticle ordering, regardless of the distinctive formation process. 

    We followed the two-stage formation mechanism of mesocrystals in levitating colloidal drops with real-time SAXS. Modelling of the SAXS data with the square-well potential together with calculations of van der Waals interactions suggests that the nanocubes initially form disordered clusters, which quickly transform into an ordered phase.

  • 19.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Høydalsvik, Kristin
    Mayence, Arnaud
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Karvinen, Petri
    Liebi, Marianne
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Nygård, Kim
    Controlling Orientational and Translational Order of Iron Oxide Nanocubes by Assembly in Nanofluidic Containers2015In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 31, no 45, 12537-12543 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate that spatial confinement can be used to control the orientational and translational order of cubic nanoparticles. For this purpose we have combined X-ray scattering and scanning electron microscopy to study the ordering of iron oxide nanocubes that have self-assembled from toluene-based dispersions in nanofluidic channels. An analysis of scattering vector components with directions parallel and perpendicular to the slit walls shows that the confining walls induce a preferential parallel alignment of the nanocube (100) faces. Moreover, slit wall separations that are commensurate with an integer multiple of the edge length of the oleic acid-capped nanocubes result in a more pronounced translational order of the self-assembled arrays compared to incommensurate confinement. These results show that the confined assembly of anisotropic nanocrystals is a promising route to nanoscale devices with tunable anisotropic properties.

  • 20.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Plivelic, Tomas S.
    Labrador, Ana
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following in Real Time the Two-Step Assembly of Nanoparticles into Mesocrystals in Levitating Drops2016In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 16, no 11, 6838-6843 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesocrystals composed of crystallographically aligned nanocrystals are present in biominerals and assembled materials which show strongly directional properties of importance for mechanical protection and functional devices. Mesocrystals are commonly formed by complex biomineralization processes and can also be generated by assembly of anisotropic nanocrystals. Here, we follow the evaporation-induced assembly of maghemite nanocubes into mesocrystals in real time in levitating drops. Analysis of time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering data and ex situ scanning electron microscopy together with interparticle potential calculations show that the substrate-free, particle-mediated crystallization process proceeds in two stages involving the formation and rapid transformation of a dense, structurally disordered phase into ordered mesocrystals. Controlling and tailoring the particle-mediated formation of mesocrystals could be utilized to assemble designed nanoparticles into new materials with unique functions.

  • 21.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following the Assembly of Iron Oxide Nanocubes by Video Microscopy and Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring2017In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 33, no 1, 303-310 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied the growth of ordered arrays by evaporation-induced self-assembly of iron oxide nanocubes with edge lengths of 6.8 and 10.1 nm using video microscopy (VM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Ex situ electron diffraction of the ordered arrays demonstrates that the crystal axes of the nanocubes are coaligned and confirms that the ordered arrays are mesocrystals. Time-resolved video microscopy shows that growth of the highly ordered arrays at slow solvent evaporation is controlled by particle diffusion and can be described by a simple growth model. The growth of each mesocrystal depends only on the number of nanoparticles within the accessible region irrespective of the relative time of formation. The mass of the dried mesocrystals estimated from the analysis of the bandwidth-shift-to-frequency-shift ratio correlates well with the total mass of the oleate-coated nanoparticles in the deposited dispersion drop.

  • 22.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Following the mesocrystal growth of self-assembling iron oxide nanocubes by video microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoringManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Agthe, Michael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Mouzon, Johanne
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Dynamic growth modes of ordered arrays and mesocrystals during drop-casting of iron oxide nanocubes2014In: CrystEngComm, ISSN 1466-8033, E-ISSN 1466-8033, Vol. 16, no 8, 1443-1450 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The growth modes of self-assembled mesocrystals and ordered arrays from dispersions of iron oxide nanocubes with a mean edge length of 9.6 nm during controlled solvent removal have been investigated with a combination of visible light video microscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Mesocrystals with translational and orientational order of sizes up to 10 mu m are formed spontaneously during the final, diffusion-controlled, drop-casting stage when the liquid film is very thin and the particle concentration is high. Convection-driven deposition of ordered nanocube arrays at the edge of the drying droplet is a manifestation of the so called coffee-ring effect. Dendritic growth or fingering of rapidly growing arrays of ordered nanocubes could also be observed in a transition regime as the growth front moves from the initial three-phase contact line towards the centre of the original droplet.

  • 24.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ekström, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Zaitsev, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of ketones catalyzed by amino acid derived rhodium complexes: on the origin of enantioselectivity and enantioswitchability: Corrigendum to vol 15(2009) 42, pp. 11197-2010In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 16, no 35, 10610-10610 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Ryberg, Per
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Nordin, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mechanistic investigation of enantioswitchable catalysts for asymmetric transfer hydrogenation2010In: Abstracts of Papers, 239th ACS National Meeting, San Francisco , CA, United States, March 21-25, 2010, Washington: American Chemical Society , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 26. Ahmed, Istaq
    et al.
    Kinyanjui, Francis G.
    Steegstra, Patrick
    Shen, Zhijian J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Eriksson, Sten-G.
    Nygren, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Improved Proton Conductivity in Spark-Plasma Sintered Dense Ceramic BaZr0.5In0.5O3-delta2010In: Electrochemical and solid-state letters, ISSN 1099-0062, Vol. 13, no 11, b130-B134 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spark-plasma sintering method was used to prepare dense proton conducting perovskite oxide BaZr0.5In0.5O3-delta. Analysis of X-ray powder diffraction data showed that the sample adopt the cubic crystal structure having the space group Pm3m. Thermogravimetric analysis of prehydrated samples showed significant mass losses beyond 300 degrees C due to loss of protons as water vapor. Scanning electron microscope images show that the grain size of the spark-plasma sintered dense sample was smaller than that of solid-state sintered porous sample. The highest total proton conductivity (2 X 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 450 degrees C) was found for dense spark-plasma sintered sample under wet H-2 than the samples prepared by other routes.

  • 27. Aidas, Kestutis
    et al.
    Agren, Hans
    Kongsted, Jacob
    Laaksonen, Aatto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Mocci, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    A quantum mechanics/molecular dynamics study of electric field gradient fluctuations in the liquid phase. the case of na+ in aqueous solution2013In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 15, no 5, 1621-1631 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Na-23 quadrupolar coupling constant of the Na+ ion in aqueous solution has been predicted using molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods for the calculation of electric field gradients. The developed computational approach is generally expected to provide reliable estimates of the quadrupolar coupling constants of monoatomic species in condensed phases, and we show here that intermolecular polarization and non-electrostatic interactions are of crucial importance as they result in a 100% increased quadrupolar coupling constant of the ion as compared to a simpler pure electrostatic picture. These findings question the reliability of the commonly applied classical Sternheimer approximation for the calculations of the electric field gradient. As it can be expected from symmetry considerations, the quadrupolar coupling constants of the 5- and 6-coordinated Na+ ions in solution are found to differ significantly.

  • 28.
    Akhtar, Farid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Ceramic reinforced high modulus steel composites: processing, microstructure and properties2014In: Canadian metallurgical quarterly, ISSN 0008-4433, E-ISSN 1879-1395, Vol. 53, no 3, 253-263 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic reinforced steel matrix composites are materials for automotive, aerospace, wear and cutting applications. Such metal matrix composites (MMCs) combine attractive physical, mechanical and wear properties with ease of fabrication and low cost. The review focuses on the current state of the art of producing these metal matrix composites, ceramics reinforcements, composition of steel matrix, microstructure evolution and parameters influencing the mechanical and wear properties. Processing methods to fabricate ceramic reinforced steel matrix composites are discussed to produce these composites with low number of defects, homogeneous microstructure and high mechanical and wear performance. The influence of chemical nature of ceramic reinforcements and composition of steel matrix on the microstructure, mechanical and wear properties is presented. The strengthening mechanisms and parameters controlling wear performance of steel MMCs are described as a function of the content of ceramic reinforcements, microstructural design and structure of the steel matrix. Keeping in view the stability of ceramics in steels, suitable ceramic reinforcements and steel matrix materials are discussed. Moreover, the importance of microstructure and interface between ceramic reinforcement and steel matrix in controlling the mechanical properties of steel MMCs is highlighted. The review identifies area of research for development to fully appreciate and tailor the properties of these industrially important composites.

  • 29.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ali, Liaqat
    Peizhong, Feng
    Shah, Jawad Ali
    Enhanced sintering, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel with MoSi(2) addition2011In: Journal of Alloys and Compounds, ISSN 0925-8388, Vol. 509, no 35, 8794-8797 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sintering 316L stainless steel to near full density with an appropriate sintering additive can ensure high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. We present here a sintering approach which exploits the dissociation of ceramics in steels at high temperatures to activate sintering densification to achieve near full dense 316L stainless steel materials. MoSi(2) ceramic powder was used as a sintering additive for pre-alloyed 316L stainless steel powder. Sintering behavior and microstructure evolution were investigated at various sintering temperatures and content of MoSi(2) as sintering additive. The results showed that the sintering densification was enhanced with temperature and MoSi(2) content. The distribution of MoSi(2) was characterized by XMAPs. It was found that MoSi(2) dissociated during sintering and Mo and Si segregated at the grain boundaries. Excess Mo and Si were appeared as separate phases in the microstructure. Above 98% of theoretical density was achieved when the specimens were sintered at 1300 degrees C for 60 min with 5 wt.% MoSi(2) content. The stainless steel sintered with 5 wt.% MoSi(2) exhibited very attractive mechanical properties.

  • 30.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Andersson, Linnea
    Ogunwumi, Steven
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Structuring adsorbents and catalysts by processing of porous powders2014In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, ISSN 0955-2219, Vol. 34, no 7, 1643-1666 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microporous materials such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, activated carbons and aluminum phosphates are suitable for catalysis and separation applications. These high surface area materials are invariably produced in particulate forms and need to be transformed into hierarchically porous structures for high performance adsorbents or catalysts. Structuring of porous powders enables an optimized structure with high mass transfer, low pressure drop, good heat management, and high mechanical and chemical stability. The requirements and important properties of hierarchically porous structures are reviewed with a focus on applications in gas separation and catalysis. Versatile powder processing routes to process porous powders into hierarchically porous structures like extrusion, coatings of scaffolds and honeycombs, colloidal processing and direct casting, and sacrificial approaches are presented and discussed. The use and limitations of the use of inorganic binders for increasing the mechanical strength is reviewed, and the most important binder systems, e.g. clays and silica, are described in detail. Recent advances to produce binder-free and complex shaped hierarchically porous monoliths are described and their performance is compared with traditional binder-containing structured adsorbents. Needs related to better thermal management and improved kinetics and volume efficiency are discussed and an outlook on future research is also given.

  • 31.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Andersson, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Keshavarzi, Neda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Colloidal processing and CO2 capture performance of sacrificially templated zeolite monoliths2012In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 97, 289-296 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Sacrificial templating of suspension cast and subsequently thermally treated zeolite monoliths with glassy carbon spheres and fibers yielded zeolite 13X and silicalite-1 monoliths with macroporosities up to 50 vol%. Homogeneous distribution of the macroporosity in hierarchically porous monoliths was obtained by tailoring the surface chemistry of the carbon particles by polyelectrolyte-assisted adsorption of zeolite particles. The effect of amount of kaolin binder and temperature for the thermal treatment on the monoliths strength, surface area and CO2 uptake was studied by diametral compression tests, electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and gas adsorption. Cyclic adsorption and regeneration measurements showed that zeolite 13X monoliths display a high CO2 uptake while the silicalite-1 monoliths could be regenerated with a relatively low energy penalty.

  • 32.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Colloidal Processing and Thermal Treatment of Binderless Hierarchically Porous Zeolite 13X Monoliths for CO2 Capture2011In: Journal of The American Ceramic Society, ISSN 0002-7820, E-ISSN 1551-2916, Vol. 94, no 1, 199-205 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adsorbents with high surface area are potential candidates forefficient postcombustion CO2 capture. Binderless zeolite 13Xmonoliths with a hierarchical porosity and high CO2 uptakehave been produced by slip casting followed by pressurelessthermal treatment. The zeolite powder displayed an isoelectricpoint at pH 4.7 and electrostatically stabilized suspensions couldbe prepared at alkaline pH. The volume fraction-dependentsteady shear viscosity could be fitted to a modified Krieger–Dougherty model with a maximum volume fraction of 0.66. Thenarrow temperature range where monoliths could be producedwithout significant loss of the microporous surface area wasidentified and related to the phase behavior of the 13X material.Slip casting of concentrated suspensions followed by thermaltreatment of the powder bodies at a temperature of 8001Cwithout holding time resulted into strong hierarchically porouszeolite 13X monolith that displayed a CO2 uptake larger than29 wt%.

  • 33.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Keshavarzi, Neda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Shakarova, Dilshod
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Cheung, Ocean
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Aluminophosphate monoliths with high CO2-over-N2 selectivity and CO2 capture capacity2014In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 4, no 99, 55877-55883 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monoliths of microporous aluminophosphates (AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53) were structured by binder-freepulsed current processing. Such monoliths could be important for carbon capture from flue gas. TheAlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths exhibited a tensile strength of 1.0 MPa and a CO2 adsorption capacityof 2.5 mmol g1 and 1.6 mmol g1, respectively at 101 kPa and 0 C. Analyses of single component CO2and N2 adsorption data indicated that the AlPO4-53 monoliths had an extraordinarily high CO2-over-N2selectivity from a binary gas mixture of 15 mol% CO2 and 85 mol% N2. The estimated CO2 capturecapacity of AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths in a typical pressure swing adsorption (PSA) process at 20C was higher than that of the commonly used zeolite 13X granules. Under cyclic sorption conditions,AlPO4-17 and AlPO4-53 monoliths were regenerated by lowering the pressure of CO2. Regeneration wasdone without application of heat, which would regenerate them to their full capacity for CO2 adsorption.

  • 34.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Liu, Qingling
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hedin, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Strong and binder free structured zeolite sorbents with very high CO2-over-N-2 selectivities and high capacities to adsorb CO2 rapidly2012In: Energy & Environmental Science, ISSN 1754-5692, Vol. 5, no 6, 7664-7673 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanically strong monoliths of zeolite NaKA with a hierarchy of pores displayed very high CO2-over-N-2 selectivity. The zeolite monoliths were produced by pulsed current processing (PCP) without the use of added binders and with a preserved microporous crystal structure. Adsorption isotherms of CO2 and N-2 were determined and used to predict the co-adsorption of CO2 and N-2 using ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The IAST predictions showed that monolithic adsorbents of NaKA could reach an extraordinarily high CO2-over-N-2 selectivity in a binary mixture with a composition similar to flue gas (15 mol% CO2 and 85 mol% N2 at 25 degrees C and 101 kPa). Structured NaKA monoliths with a K+ content of 9.9 at% combined a CO2-over-N-2 selectivity of >1100 with a high CO2 adsorption capacity (4 mmol g(-1)) and a fast adsorption kinetics (on the order of one minute). Estimates of a figure of merit (F) based on IAST CO2-over-N-2 selectivity, and time-dependent CO2 uptake capacity, suggest that PCP-produced structured NaKA with a K+ content of 9.9 at% offers a performance far superior to 13X adsorbents, in particular at short cycle times.

  • 35.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Ojuva, Arto
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Wirawan, Sang Kompiang
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hierarchically porous binder-free silicalite-1 discs: a novel support for all-zeolite membranes2011In: Journal of Materials Chemistry, ISSN 0959-9428, E-ISSN 1364-5501, Vol. 21, no 24, 8822-8828 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thermal expansion mismatch between the zeolite film and the support is an important cause for the formation of defects and cracks during the fabrication and use of zeolite membranes. We have studied how silicalite-1 discs with a permeability comparable to commercially available alumina supports can be produced by pulsed current processing (PCP) as a novel substrate for all-zeolite membranes. Hierarchically porous and mechanically strong membrane supports where the surface area and crystallography of the silicalite-1 particles were maintained could be obtained by carefully controlling the thermal treatment during PCP consolidation. In situ X-ray diffraction and dilatometry showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the silicalite-1 substrate was negative in the temperature range 200-800 degrees C while the commonly used alumina substrate displayed a positive CTE. The critical temperature variation, Delta T, and thicknesses for crack-free supported zeolite films with a negative CTE were estimated using a fracture energy model. Zeolite films with a thickness of 1 mu m can only sustain a relatively modest Delta T of 100 degrees when supported onto alumina substrates while the all-zeolite membranes can support temperature variations above 500 degrees.

  • 36.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    Rehman, Yaser
    Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Engineering and Technology Lahore, Pakistan.
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Materials Chemistry.
    A study of the sintering of diatomaceous earth to produce porous ceramic monolithswith bimodal porosity and high strength2010In: Powder Technology, ISSN 0032-5910, E-ISSN 1873-328X, Vol. 201, 253-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Diatomite powder, a naturally occurring porous raw material, was used to fabricate ceramic materials withbimodal porosity and high strength. The effect of the sintering temperature on the density and porosity ofdry pressed diatomite green bodies was evaluated using mercury porosimetry and water immersionmeasurements. It was found that the intrinsic porosity of the diatomite particles with a pore size around0.2 μm was lost at sintering temperatures above 1200 °C. Maintaining the sintering temperature at around1000 °C resulted in highly porous materials that also displayed a high compressive strength. Microstructuralstudies by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis suggested that the porecollapse was facilitated by the presence of low melting impurities like Na2O and K2O.

  • 37.
    Akhtar, Farid
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Sjöberg, Erik
    Korelskiy, Danil
    Rayson, Mark
    Hedlund, Jonas
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Preparation of graded silicalite-1 substrates for all-zeolite membranes with excellent CO2/H-2 separation performance2015In: Journal of Membrane Science, ISSN 0376-7388, E-ISSN 1873-3123, Vol. 493, 206-211 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graded silicalite-1 substrates with a high gas permeability and low surface roughness have been produced by pulsed current processing of a thin coating of a submicron silicalite-1 powder onto a powder body of coarser silicalite-1 crystals. Thin zeolite films have been hydrothermally grown onto the graded silicalite-1 support and the all-zeolite membranes display an excellent CO2/H-2 separation factor of 12 at 0 degrees C and a CO2 permeance of 21.3 x 10(-7) mol m(-2) s(-1) Pa-1 for an equimolar CO2/H-2 feed at 505 kPa and 101 kPa helium sweep gas. Thermal cracking estimates based on calculated surface energies and measured thermal expansion coefficients suggest that all-zeolite membranes with a minimal thermal expansion mismatch between the graded substrate and the zeolite film should remain crack-free during thermal cycling and the critical calcination step.

  • 38.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Das, Arindam
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Huang, Genping
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Himo, Fahmi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Stereoselective allylboration of imines and indoles under mild conditions. An in situ E/Z isomerization of imines by allylboroxines2014In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, E-ISSN 2041-6539, Vol. 5, no 7, 2732-2738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Direct allylboration of various acyclic and cyclic aldimine, ketimine and indole substrates was performed using allylboronic acids. The reaction proceeds with very high anti-stereoselectivity for both E and Z imines. The allylboroxines formed by dehydration of allylboronic acids have a dual effect: promoting E/Z isomerization of aldimines and triggering the allylation by efficient electron withdrawal from the imine substrate.

  • 39.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diner, Colin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Jonker, Sybrand
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Catalytic Asymmetric Allylboration of Indoles and Dihydroisoquinolines with Allylboronic Acids: Stereodivergent Synthesis of up to Three Contiguous Stereocenters2016In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 55, no 46, 14417-14421 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The catalytic asymmetric allylboration of cyclic imines with gamma,gamma-disubstituted allylboronic acids provides products with adjacent stereocenters in high yield and stereoselectivity. Various electrophiles, including 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines and indoles, were prenylated in a fully stereodivergent fashion by switching the E/Z geometry of the allylboronate and/or the enantiomer of the BINOL catalyst. 3-Methylindole provided products with three adjacent stereocenters with high stereoselectivity in one synthetic operation.

  • 40.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Mihai, Raducan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Inorganic and Structural Chemistry.
    Szabo, Kalman J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Selective Formation of Adjacent Stereocenters by Allylboration of Ketones under Mild Neutral Conditions2013In: Organic Letters, ISSN 1523-7060, E-ISSN 1523-7052, Vol. 15, no 10, 2546-2549 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboronic acids readily react with a broad variety of ketones, affording homoallylic alcohols with adjacent quaternary and tertiary stereocenters. The reaction proceeds with very high anti stereoselectivity even if the substituents of the keto group have a similar size. a-Keto acids react with syn stereoselectivity probably due to the formation of acyl boronate intermediates. The allylation reactions proceed without added acids/bases under mild conditions. Because of this, many functionalities are tolerated even with in situ generated allylboronic acids.

  • 41.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Raducan, Mihai
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Diastereoselective allylboration of wide variety of carbonyl compounds using allylboronic acids: Construction of adjacent tertiary and quaternary centers2013In: Abstracts of papers of The American Chemical Society, American Chemical Society (ACS), 2013, Vol. 246, 364-ORGN- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Alam, Rauful
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Vollgraff, Tobias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Szabó, Kálmán J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Synthesis of Adjacent Quaternary Stereocenters by Catalytic Asymmetric Allylboration2015In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 137, no 35, 11262-11265 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Allylboration of ketones with gamma-disubstituted allylboronic acids is performed in the presence of chiral BINOL derivatives. The reaction is suitable for single-step creation of adjacent quaternary stereocenters with high selectivity. We show that, with an appropriate choice of the chiral catalyst and the stereoisomeric prenyl substrate, full control of the stereo- and enantioselectivity is possible in the reaction.

  • 43. Alammar, Tarek
    et al.
    Hamm, Ines
    Grasmik, Viktoria
    Wark, Michael
    Mudring, Anja-Verena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK). Iowa State University, United States; U.S. Department of Energy, United States; Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany.
    Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Perovskite SrSnO3 Nanocrystals in Ionic Liquids for Photocatalytic Applications2017In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 56, no 12, 6920-6932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanosized SrSnO3 photocatalysts have been successfully synthesized by microwave synthesis in various ionic liquids (ILs) followed by a heat treatment process to optimize the materials' crystallinity. The influence of the ILs with various cations such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C(4)mim](+)), 6-bis(3-methylimidazolium-1-yl)hexane ([C-6(mim)(2)](2+)), butylpyridinium ([C4Py](+)), and tetradecyltrihexylphosphonium ([P-66614](+)) and bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Tf2N](-)) as the anion on the structure, crystallization, and morphology of the products was investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area analysis by gas adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), diffuse reflectance UV vis spectroscopy, and Raman and IR spectroscopy. According to structure characterization by XRD and Raman spectroscopy all samples wcrystallized phase-pure in the orthorhombic GdFeO3 perovskite structure type. SEM reveals that, on the basis of the IL, th(e) obtained SrSnO3 nanoparticles exhibit different morphologies and sizes. Rod-shaped particles are formed in [C(4)minn][Tf2N], [C-6(mim)(2)][Tf2N](2), and p [P-66614][Tf2N]. However, the particle dimensions and size distribution vary depending on the IL and range from quite thin and long needlelike partinles with a narrow size distribution obtained in [P-66614] [TfA to relatively larger particles with a broader size distribution obtained in [C-6(mim)(2)][Tf2N](2). In contrast, in [C4Py][Tf2N] nanospheres with a diameter of about 50 nm form. For these particles the highest photocatalytic activity was observed. Our investigations indicate that the improved photocatalytic activity of this material results from the synergistic effect of the relatively large surface area associated with nanosize and an appropriate energy band structure.

  • 44. Albat, Martin
    et al.
    Inge, Andrew Kentaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Stock, Norbert
    Synthesis and crystal structure of three new bismuth(III) arylsulfonatocarboxylates2017In: Zeitschrift für Kristallographie - Crystalline Materials, ISSN 2194-4946, Vol. 232, no 1-3, 245-253 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three new bismuth arylsulfonatocarboxylates [Bi(OH)(SB)] (1), [Bi-4(ST)(2)(HST)O-2(H2O)(2)]center dot H2O (2) and [Bi-4(ST)(2)O-3(H2O)(2)] (3) were synthesized under solvothermal reaction conditions at 180 degrees C using the potassium or sodium salt of 4-sulfobenzoic acid (H2SB) and 2-sulfoterephthalic acid (H3ST), respectively. The compounds were characterized in detail and the crystal structures were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Phase purity was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. Structural comparisons to the only three other known bismuth sulfonatocarboxylates are presented. Due to the higher reaction temperatures employed for the synthesis of the title compounds a higher degree of condensation of the BiOx polyhedra (X = 7 or 8) to tetrameric units, 1D chains or a 2D layer is observed. Connection through the organic linker molecules leads to the formation of 3D coordination polymers in all three title compounds.

  • 45. Alexander, Jan
    et al.
    Benford, Diane
    Boobis, Alan
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Scientific Opinion on Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs) in Food2011In: EFSA Journal, ISSN 1831-4732, Vol. 9, no 7, 2296- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    EFSA was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs) in food. HBCDDs are additive flame retardants primarily used in expanded and extruded polystyrene applied as construction and packing materials, and in textiles. Technical HBCDD predominantly consists of three stereoisomers (α-, β- and γ-HBCDD). Also δ- and ε-HBCDD may be present but at very low concentrations. HBCDDs are present in the environment and likewise in biota and in food and feed. Data from the analysis of HBCDDs in 1,914 food samples were provided to EFSA by seven European countries, covering the period from 2000 to 2010. The Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel) selected α-, β- and γ-HBCDD to be of primary interest. Since all toxicity studies were carried out with technical HBCDD, a risk assessment of individual stereoisomers was not possible. Main targets were the liver, thyroid hormone homeostasis and the reproductive, nervous and immune systems. HBCDDs are not genotoxic. The CONTAM Panel identified neurodevelopmental effects on behaviour as the critical endpoint, and derived a benchmark dose lower confidence limit for a benchmark response of 10 % (BMDL10) of 0.79 mg/kg body weight. Due to the limitations and uncertainties in the current data base, the CONTAM Panel concluded that it was inappropriate to use this BMDL to establish a health based guidance value, and instead used a margin of exposure (MOE) approach for the health risk assessment of HBCDDs. Since elimination characteristics of HBCDDs in animals and humans differ, the Panel used the body burden as starting point for the MOE approach. The CONTAM Panel concluded that current dietary exposure to HBCDDs in the European Union does not raise a health concern. Also additional exposure, particularly of young children, to HBCDDs from house dust is unlikely to raise a health concern

  • 46. Alexander, Jan
    et al.
    Benford, Diane
    Boobis, Alan
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Scientific Opinion on Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) in Food2011In: EFSA Journal, ISSN 1831-4732, Vol. 9, no 5, 2156- p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 47. Alexander, Jan
    et al.
    Benford, Diane
    Boobis, Alan
    Bergman, Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK), Environmental Chemistry.
    Scientific Opinion on Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and its derivatives in food: EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM)2011In: EFSA Journal, ISSN 1831-4732, Vol. 9, no 12, 2477- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    EFSA was asked by the European Commission to deliver a scientific opinion on tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and its derivatives in food. TBBPA and its derivatives are widely used as flame retardants. TBBPA is primarily used as reactive flame retardant covalently bound to epoxy and polycarbonate resins. TBBPA derivatives are used as either reactive or additive intermediates in polymer manufacture. Data from the analysis of TBBPA in 344 food samples were submitted to EFSA by two European countries (Norway and Spain), covering the period from 2007 to 2010. All samples were in the food group “Fish and other seafood”, and all analytical results were reported as less than the limit of quantification (LOQ) (about 1 ng/g wet weight). Toxicological studies with TBBPA have been carried out using different experimental designs with single or repeated administration during gestation, postnatally or in adulthood. The main target is thyroid hormone homeostasis. TBBPA is not genotoxic. There are no indications that TBBPA might be carcinogenic. The Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM Panel) identified a lower confidence limit for a benchmark response of 10 % (BMDL10) of 16 mg/kg b.w. reported for changes in thyroid hormones as the critical reference point. Due to the limitations and uncertainties in the database, the CONTAM Panel concluded that it was inappropriate to use this BMDL to establish a health based guidance value, and therefore used a margin of exposure (MOE) approach for the health risk assessment of TBBPA. In view of the large MOEs, the CONTAM Panel concluded that current dietary exposure to TBBPA in the European Union does not raise a health concern. Also exposure of infants via human milk does not raise a health concern. Additional exposure, particularly of young children, to TBBPA from house dust is unlikely to raise a health concern.

  • 48. Alfonso E., Garcia-Bennett
    et al.
    Xiao, Changhong
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Chunfang, Zhou
    Toen, Castle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Keiichi, Miyasaka
    Osamu, Terasaki
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bicontinuous Cubic Mesoporous Materials with Biphasic Structures2011In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 17, no 48, 13510-13516 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The replication of amphiphilic systems within an inorganic silica matrix allows the study of the fundamental properties of mesostructural changes, that is, kinetic and structural parameters. Herein we report a detailed study of the transition between cubic bicontinuous mesostructure with space groups Ia$\bar 3$d and Pn$\bar 3$m symmetry, which are associated with the minimal G and D surfaces, respectively. The transition may be induced through micellar swelling of the anionic amphiphilic surfactant N-lauroyl alanine by trimethylbenzene. Rich kinetic behaviour is observed and has been exploited to prepare particles with biphasic structures. Transmission electron microscopy evidence indicates that there is epitaxial growth from one mesostructure to the other involving the [111] and [110] orientations of the Ia$\bar 3$d and Pn$\bar 3$m symmetry structures, respectively. From kinetic studies, we show that the formation of the Ia$\bar 3$d mesophase is preceded by a hexagonal phase (plane group p6mm) and an epitaxial relationship has been observed involving the sixfold or $\bar 3$ axis orientations of both structures. Our data suggests that the Pn$\bar 3$m mesostructure is kinetically stable at low temperatures whereas the Ia$\bar 3$d mesostructure is the more stable structure after prolonged periods of hydrothermal treatment. We present evidence from transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray diffractograms and also electron crystallography modelling of the unit cells at particular points in the structural change.

  • 49.
    Ali, S. K. Imran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Kremer, Reinhard K.
    Johnsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hydrothermal Synthesis of the Oxofluoride FeSbO2F2-An Anti-ferromagnetic Spin S=5/2 Compound2017In: Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0020-1669, E-ISSN 1520-510X, Vol. 56, no 8, 4662-4667 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The new oxofluoride compound FeSbO2F2 was synthesized by hydro thermal techniques at 230 degrees C. Its crystal structure was determined from single-crystal Xray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c with one crystallographic site for Fe3+ and SP3+, respectively. The crystal structure is made of [FeO2F4] octahedra and seesaw [SbO4] building blocks. These are connected to form [FeO2F2] layers and [SbO2] chains that bond together via the oxygen atoms to form the three-dimensional framework structure. Magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements indicate long-range anti-ferromagnetic ordering below a Neel temperature of similar to 175 K Two-dimensional anti-ferromagnetic short-range order in the square planar net of the Fe3+ cations extends to temperatures far above the Neel temperature.

  • 50.
    Ali, Sk Imran
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Johnsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Antimony oxofluorides - a synthesis concept that yields phase pure samples and single crystals2016In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 30, 12167-12173 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The single crystals of the new isostructural compounds Sb3O4F and Y0.5Sb2.5O4F and the two previously known compounds M-SbOF and alpha-Sb3O2F5 were successfully grown by a hydrothermal technique at 230 degrees C. The new compound Sb3O4F crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c: a = 5.6107(5) angstrom, b = 4.6847(5) angstrom, c = 20.2256(18) angstrom, p = 94.145(8)degrees, z = 4. The replacing part of Sb with Y means a slight increase in the unit cell dimensions. The compounds M-SbOF and alpha-Sb3O2F5 have not been grown as single crystals before and it can be concluded that hydrothermal synthesis has proved to be a suitable technique for growing single crystals of antimony oxofluorides because of the relatively low solubility of such compounds compared to other antimony oxohalides that most often have been synthesised at high temperatures by solid state reactions or gas-solid reactions.

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