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  • 1.
    Acaralp, Linnéa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    U.S. Drone Attacks and the Proportionality Principle: Growing ignorance or Consciousness?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis focuses on the usage of military drones, a type of semi-autonomous weapon, which has shifted the premises of conventional warfare, particularly relating to the ethics and legality of warfare. This paper examines the conditions that affect the civilian casualties in United States (U.S.) drone attacks. Drawing on Graham Allison’s work on the factors that influence U.S. foreign policy decision making, I theorize that civilian collateral casualties are more likely under certain conditions. These conditions changes depending on the type of administration in office, level of organization pressure, and the value and level of risk a target directs towards the U.S. In light of the discussion and the effect of drones on civilian casualties a debate upon the proportionality principle will be assessed. In the assessment a cost and benefit analysis is made between the military goal and civilian casualties (Gardam,1993). The proportionality principle refers to the balancing act of the excessive use of force on civilians in relation to the military goal.

    This paper is using a quantitative method. This study investigate data on US drone attacks, sourced from Bureau of Investigative Journalism, covering 733 attacks in four countries (Afghanistan, Yemen, Somalia and Pakistan) during the time period from 2002 to 2016. Based on Allison’s model three hypotheses are formulated and evaluated against the data using descriptive statistic and t-tests. The empirical result suggests that there was a statistical significance in all three hypotheses, indicating that it was possible to detect that under certain circumstances drone attacks are more likely to lead to more civilian casualties. However, when one observed the total casualties in proportion to the civilian casualties the result was not as grand as anticipated. However, the findings of this paper illustrates a pattern that during certain premises and cost and benefit analyses, the usage of drones are causing a greater risk towards civilians. Thus, these discussions further develop an already existing debate on today’s focus on military autonomous weapons and the results of using such weapons. Hence, this type of study can be applied to other military autonomous weapons as well. In light of the discussion of the proportionality principle, this paper suggest that the development of autonomous military weapons should not be taken lightly and an improvement of international regulations should perhaps be made. 

  • 2.
    Ageman, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    ”Ett möte mellan administration och mellanmänsklig makt”: En intervjustudie med LSS-handläggare i Stockholm stad2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie var att genom semistrukturerade intervjuer med yrkesverksamma LSS-handläggare analysera om det förekommer policykrockar/policykonflikter i deras arbete samt att utifrån en tolkning av deras berättelse analysera hur deras handlingsutrymme ser ut och om det kan antas ha förändrats utifrån den ekonomiska åtstramningen som präglar insatserna inom LSS. Studiens två frågeställningar är följande: Förekommer det några yttre policykonflikter, det vill säga, en diskrepans mellan intention och utfall i LSS-handläggarnas arbete samt förekommer det några inre konflikter hos handläggarna? Och: Hur ser LSS-handläggarnas handlingsutrymme ut och har det förändrats på grund av den ekonomiska åtstramningen? Studien har utgått från Michael Lipskys teori om street level bureaucracy som under uppsatsens gång utvecklats genom senare studier. Den insamlade datan har sedan, med hjälp en abduktiv tematisk dataanalys, analyserats utifrån de två valda teoretiska begreppen: policykonflikter samt handlingsutrymme. Resultatet visade att handläggarnas handlingsutrymme ser olika ut utifrån vilken stadsdelsförvaltning de jobbar inom och påverkas av vilken ekonomi som råder. Rättsläget förändras kontinuerligt vilket kan leda till att inre policykonflikter inom handläggarna uppstår, i form av att deras egna åsikter och värderingar skiljer sig från vad de har för resurser att besluta om men även yttre konflikter där de behöver använda fler typer av dokument för att kunna förstå intentionen bakom en riktlinje. Resultatet visar även på att arbetsbördan för LSS-handläggare ökar, i form av arbetsuppgifter där det kan handla om att bemöta personliga ombud till rent administrativa uppgifter som växer i antal.

  • 3.
    Aggestam, Lisbeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    A European foreign policy?: role conceptions and the politics of identity in Britain, France and Germany2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 4. Aggestam, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Engelbrekt, Kjell
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wagnsson, Lotta
    Winnerstig, Mike
    Europeisk säkerhetspolitik2000Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Europeisk säkerhetspolitik är ett ständigt aktuellt ämnesområde. Här presenteras ingående analyser av den europeiska säkerhetssituationens mest centrala problem. Boken ger också en översikt av de förklaringsmodeller som brukar användas för att förstå säkerhetsproblematiken. Författarna, statsvetare vid Stockholms universitet, ingår i Stockholmsgruppen för europeiska säkerhetsstudier.

  • 5.
    Agne, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Accountability's Effect: Reaction Speed and Legitimacy in Global Governance2016In: Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations, ISSN 1075-2846, E-ISSN 1942-6720, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 575-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines whether and how accountability in international organizations (IOs) influences their speed of reaction to economic and humanitarian crises. Reaction speed is one among several factors in the capacity of IOs to handle crisis-like problems and, therefore, also a factor in their capacity to create legitimacy for themselves. Original theoretical arguments and statistical survival analyses of the time it takes for IOs to react to crises confirm that accountability in IOs indeed affects reaction speed. However, the effect varies depending on the use of alternative accountability mechanisms. Transparency speeds up reactions while stake-holder participation slows them down. More generally, this article identifies synergies, trade-offs, and nonlinear relationships between reaction speed and different accountability mechanisms that should be reflected in debates on legitimacy in global governance as well as in the institutional design of legitimate IOs.

  • 6.
    Agne, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democratic founding: we the people and the others2012In: International Journal of Constitutional Law, ISSN 1474-2640, E-ISSN 1474-2659, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 836-861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In democratic theory, it goes without saying that people should establish their own political orders. However, the making of states or constitutions sometimes involves people with no intention of actually joining the new political order, as in the U.S.-led regime change of Afghanistan and Iraq or the UN administration of postconflict Kosovo and Timor-Leste. Could such policies be reconciled with the conviction that people should establish their own political orders? In this paper I will develop an affirmative answer to this question. The founding of a state is democratic-that is, constituted by the people subject to this foundational decision-when agreed to by as many persons as possible within and beyond the boundaries of the state to be founded. Hence, the very sense in which a state may have been democratically founded in the past presupposes an involvement of people beyond its current boundaries. Moreover, the moral values inherent in the practice of people constituting their own states do not imply restriction of power to the group of future citizens but protection of their autonomy, and, properly understood, the realization of this autonomy is contingent on people who will remain outside the state once founded.

  • 7.
    Agne, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The autonomy of globalizing states: bridging the gap between democratic theory and international political economy2011In: International Political Science Review, ISSN 0192-5121, E-ISSN 1460-373X, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars of democratic theory and international political economy often disagree over the effects of globalization on state autonomy. Yet, each approach pays minimal attention to the contributions of the other to their common object of study. In an effort to remedy this situation, I identify the premises and procedural habits of each approach which tend to make it appear irrelevant to the other, and then adjust them to remove the appearance of irrelevance without impairing the integrity of each approach. The argument is illustrated by observations from Britain, France and Sweden in recent decades.

  • 8.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    A Dogma of Democratic Theory and Globalization: Why Politics Need not Include Everyone it Affects2006In: European Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1354-0661, E-ISSN 1460-3713, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 433-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines and questions a principle in democratic theory which has become particularly fashionable in analyses of globalization and European integration, namely that everyone affected by a decision should be able to participate in making it. It is found that this principle is too strong to fit with the meaning of democracy, leads to tautological arguments, is indeterminate in politically important cases and, if its indeterminacy is rectified, fails to support ideas of political equality and accountability. Removing this principle from the concept of democracy implies, among other things, that empirical analysis becomes more significant, indeed necessary, for assessment of effects of globalization on democracy. Parallel to the development of critical arguments is the defence of a theoretical alternative according to which the delimitation of democratic communities should be decided on the grounds of what effect it produces in terms of autonomy for everyone, those included as well as those excluded.

  • 9.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Answering questions in parliament during budget debates: Deliberative reciprocity and globalisation in Western Europe2011In: Parliamentary Affairs, ISSN 0031-2290, E-ISSN 1460-2482, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 153-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much time is spent asking questions during parliamentary debates. To what extent are they answered? This paper investigates this question by examining budget debates in post-1945 France, Sweden, and the UK as well as in the European Parliament from 1996 to 2001. The purpose is to introduce an empirical approach to a theoretical discussion of whether globalisation weakens deliberative democracy within nations while strengthening it between them. It is found that deliberative reciprocity was unexpectedly stable within nations in the course of post-1945 Western globalisation, and that questions are more often answered in national parliaments than in the European Parliament. The paper concludes by considering the implications of these findings for competing visions of political debate as a means for reaching consensus or as an expression of irresolvable conflict.

  • 10.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Citizen Participation in European Politics1999Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Cosmopolitan democratic theory and legitimate founding of political community: why Turkey has a right to participate in the politics of EU enlargement2011In: European democracy and cosmopolitan democracy / [ed] Daniele Archibugi and Guido Montani, Ventotene: Altiero Spinelli Institute for Federalist Studies , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democracy Reconsidered: Britain, France, Sweden, and the EU2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate whether some positions in democratic theory should be adjusted or abandoned in view of internationalisation; and if adjusted, how. More specifically it pursues three different aims: to evaluate various attempts to explain levels of democracy as consequences of internationalisation; to investigate whether the taking into account of internationalisation reveals any reason to reconsider what democracy is or means; and to suggest normative interpretations that cohere with the adjustments of conceptual and explanatory democratic theory made in the course of meeting the other two aims.

    When empirical methods are used, the scope of the study is restricted to West European parliamentary democracies and their international affairs. More particularly, the focus is on the making of budget policy in Britain, France, and Sweden after the Second World War, and recent budget policy in the European Union. The aspects of democracy empirically analysed are political autonomy, participation, and deliberation. The material considered includes parliamentary debates, official statistics, economic forecasts, elections manifestos, shadow budgets, general election turnouts, regulations of budget decision-making, and staff numbers in government and parliament budgetary divisions.

    The study reaches the following conclusions among others. (i) The fact that internationalisation increases the divergence between those who make and those who are affected by decisions is not by itself a democratic problem that calls for political reform. (ii) That international organisations may have authorities delegated to them from democratic states is not sufficient to justify them democratically. Democratisation still needs to be undertaken. (iii) The fear that internationalisation dissolves a social trust necessary for political deliberation within nations seems to be unwarranted. If anything, views argued by others in domestic budgetary debate are taken increasingly serious during internationalisation. (iv) The major difficulty with deliberation seems to be its inability to transcend national boundaries. International deliberation at state level has not evolved in response to internationalisation and it is undeveloped in international institutions. (v) Democratic political autonomy diminishes during internationalisation with regard to income redistribution and policy areas taken over by international organisations, but it seems to increase in public spending. (vi) In the area of budget policy-making there are no signs that governments gain power at the expense of parliaments during internationalisation. (vii) To identify crucial democratic issues in a time of internationalisation and to make room for theoretical virtues like general applicability and normative fruitfulness, democracy may be defined as a kind of politics where as many as possible decide as much as possible.

  • 13.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democratic founding: We the people and the others - A rejoinder to Mark Tushnet2012In: International Journal of Constitutional Law, ISSN 1474-2640, E-ISSN 1474-2659, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 866-870Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Democratism: Towards an explanatory approach to international politics2018In: Review of International Studies, ISSN 0260-2105, E-ISSN 1469-9044, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 547-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    International politics has often been viewed as a brutal place where might trumps right and where, as a consequence, questions of democracy are irrelevant to ask. In the last decades, however, scholars and political leaders have increasingly suggested that elements of democracy exist in governance beyond individual states. If this is so, how does democracy beyond the state shape international politics? This article suggests conceptual preliminaries for theorising consequences of democracy beyond the state in general and their implications for problems of peace and conflict in particular. The purpose is twofold: first, to begin reconstructing existing normative democratic theory into an explanatory perspective sensitive to international politics; second, to indicate how this new perspective is able to explain empirical observations pertaining to conflict and cooperation among states; international institutions; foreign policies; human rights protection; and the violence of transnational terrorist networks.

  • 15.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Demokrati på europeisk nivå1998In: Demokrati på europeisk nivå? / [ed] Hans Agné, Stockholm: Fritzes offentliga publikationer , 1998, p. 7-44Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Den europeiska föreningen av välfärdsstat och gränsöverskridande kapitalism2000In: Europaperspektiv: årsbok för Europaforskning inom ekonomi, juridik och statskunskap / [ed] Ulf Bernitz, Sverker Gustavsson, Lars Oxelheim, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2000, p. 223-247Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Does global democracy matter? Hypotheses on famine and war2010In: Transnational Actors in Global Governance: Patterns, Explanations and Implications / [ed] Christer Jönsson, Jonas Tallberg, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, p. 177-196Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Would an extension of democracy to global politics have a restraining effect on famine and war just as democracy within states is commonly thought to have? This chapter will develop theoretical arguments that suggest an affirmative answer to this question and encourage the building of a research agenda which submits those arguments to empirical testing. For this purpose I will conceive of global democracy as fostered in part by transnational participation in international institutions. This premise is common in the literature to which this volume seeks to contribute, but it also serves to facilitate an empirical grounding of the theory that I seek to develop: observed variation in transnational participation in international institutions can on the basis of this premise be treated as variation also in a necessary but insufficient condition of a particular model of global democracy.

  • 18.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    European Union Conditionality: Coercion or Voluntary adaptation?2009In: Alternatives: Turkish Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1303-5525, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the enlargement conditionality of the European Union sustains opposite positions on the question of whether it represents a means of coercion or an invitation to voluntary adaptation. However, it reveals no dialogue between advocates of these opposed views. In an attempt to replace this gap in communication with a research agenda, this article undertakes a theoretical investigation of the main arguments for regarding compliance with conditionality either as an effect of coercion or as a voluntary choice. It is found that both of these views are worth taking seriously but also that they are premature and in need of further theoretical and in particular empirical clarification. It is suggested, moreover, that coercion and voluntary adaptation are best viewed as complementary rather than competing descriptions of complying with conditionality.

    Since the end of the Cold War the European Union has made use of conditionality in an increasing number of policy areas. Lending programs, trade agreements, foreign aid, and the Eastern enlargements have been promulgated through processes in which countries are required to meet certain conditions. Conditionality is also part of an established practice in global governance, featuring most notoriously in the development programs of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. And although trends like China’s economic engagement in Africa and the repayments of foreign debts in South America might limit the impact of Western conditionality, its scope and political significance remain incontestable. Indeed, in Angola, Belarus, Cuba, Indonesia, Macedonia, Serbia, Turkey, Zimbabwe, and many other places, people continue to be subject to conditions set for them by international powers.

  • 19.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europeisk demokrati sui generis. En ofta antydd men aldrig utarbetad och intagen ståndpunkt2002Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Fel syn på universitetet ger fusk och bristande kvalitet2017In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447, , p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Fiskal union för en starkare demokrati?2011In: Överlever EMU utan fiskal union? / [ed] Ulf Bernitz, Lars Oxelheim & Thomas Persson, Stockholm: Santérus Förlag, 2011, p. 247-273Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Flyktingkrisen öppnar vägar till en bättre värld2015In: Dagens nyheter, ISSN 1101-2447Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Irretrievable powers and democratic accountability2009In: The illusion of accountability in the European Union / [ed] Sverker Gustavsson, Christer Karlsson, Thomas Persson, London: Routledge, 2009, p. 51-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Is successful democracy promotion possible?: The conceptual problem2014In: Democratization, ISSN 1351-0347, E-ISSN 1743-890X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 49-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is it even logically possible for democracy promotion policies to succeed in the sense that they increase democracy in other countries? Empirical research on the conditions for success in democracy promotion must assume an affirmative answer to this question. To study something empirically, it must be logically possible in the first place. Some critical and normative theorists, on the other hand, answer the same question negatively. They suggest that promotion of democracy from the outside is a contradiction in terms, in particular cases or more generally. This article offers a framework for clarifying this disagreement and for facilitating dialogue across empirical research and normative and critical theory. I draw on this framework also to suggest a conception of democracy that maximizes the political relevance of both normative and empirical analyses of democracy promotion (DP), while freeing that same research from the intellectual blockages of potential contradictions. Such intellectual advantages follow, I argue, by defining democracy as an ideal while making its institutional implications explicit; as an exercise of either constituent or constituted power, depending on the political phase being studied; and as located in the internal relationships of world politics.

  • 25.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Legitimacy in global governance research: How normative or sociological should it be?2018In: Legitimacy in Global Governance : Sources, Processes, and Consequences / [ed] Jonas Tallberg, Karin Bäckstrand, Jan Aart Scholte, Oxford University Press, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Measuring Democratic Deliberation2006In: Political Concepts. Working papers by The Committee on Concepts and Methods of the International Political Science AssociationArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Popular power in the European Union: Delegated or Alienated?2015In: The European Union: Democratic Principles and Institutional Architectures in Times of Crisis / [ed] Simona Piattoni, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, p. 46-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The important role played by national governments in the creation of European institutions and policies is often invoked to reinforce the democratic legitimacy of the European Union. As long as leaders of all states constitutive of the EU are democratically elected, the EU has a reasonable claim to democratic legitimacy for itself, regardless of how it creates policies and institutions on an everyday basis. The powers of the EU are delegated by, and not alienated from, national democracies. Notwithstanding the importance in political practice of this attempt at defending the democratic legitimacy of the EU, this chapter suggests that it fails on theoretical grounds alone and that the normative problem indicated by this failure is aggravated as a consequence of the euro crisis. The chapter identifies more promising avenues toward a legitimate EU by examining democracy defined as a particular form of constituent power.

  • 28.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Påtvingad demokrati - det filosofiska problemet2006In: Internationella StudierArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
     The Foundation of Legitimate States: The problem of External Powers2008In: Statsvetenskaplig Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-0747, Vol. 110, no 1, p. 35-42Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Myth of International Delegation: Limits to and Suggestions for Democratic Theory in the Context of the European Union2007In: Government and Opposition, ISSN 0017-257X, E-ISSN 1477-7053Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    To Share Democratic Legitimacy Between Different Political Levels1999In: Citizen Participation in European Politics, Stockholm: Fritzes , 1999, p. 117-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Agné, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    We the People and the Others: The Co-founding of Democratic States2009In: ConWEB. Webpapers on Constitutionalism & Governance beyond the StateArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bartelson, Jens
    Erman, Eva
    Lindemann, Thomas
    Herborth, Benjamin
    Kessler, Oliver
    Chwaszcza, Christine
    Fabry, Mikulas
    Krasner, Stephen D.
    Symposium 'The politics of international recognition'2013In: International Theory, ISSN 1752-9719, E-ISSN 1752-9727, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 94-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognition plays a multifaceted role in international theory. In rarely communicating literatures, the term is invoked to explain creation of new states and international structures; policy choices by state and non-state actors; and normative justifiability, or lack thereof, of foreign and international politics. The purpose of this symposium is to open new possibilities for imagining and studying recognition in international politics by drawing together different strands of research in this area. More specifically, the forum brings new attention to controversies on the creation of states, which has traditionally been a preserve for discussion in International Law, by invoking social theories of recognition that have developed as part of International Relations more recently. It is suggested that broadening imagination across legal and social approaches to recognition provides the resources needed for theories with this object to be of maximal relevance to political practice.

  • 34.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Does stakeholder involvement foster democratic legitimacy in international organizations? An empirical assessment of a normative theory2015In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 465-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The involvement of non-state organizations in global governance is widely seen as an important step toward global democracy. Proponents of "stakeholder democracy" argue that stakeholder organizations, such as civil society groups and other non-state actors, may represent people significantly affected by global decisions better than elected governments. In this article we identify a particularly promising sociological variant of this argument, test it against new evidence from a large-scale survey among stakeholder organizations with varying levels of involvement in international organizations (IOs), and find that the suggested stakeholder mechanism for producing democratic legitimacy in global governance does not work. Stakeholder involvement is unproductive for democratic legitimacy in IOs as perceived by stakeholders themselves. We suggest alternative explanations of this finding and argue that empirical analysis is useful for adjudicating normative arguments on the viability of stakeholder democracy in global governance.

  • 35.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Jansson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Näsström, Sofia
    Tiggarna en ödesfråga för EU2014In: Göteborgsposten, ISSN 1103-9345, no 23 majArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Mörkenstam, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    PhD students supervised collectively rather than individually are quicker to complete their theses2018Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the choice, most PhD students would prefer to receive individual supervision rather than be supervised alongside their peers as part of a collective. This is understandable, given the undivided attention and precise, directly relevant advice one would receive. However, Hans Agné and Ulf Mörkenstam have compared the experiences of individually and collectively supervised students on the same doctoral programme and found that collective supervision, during the first year at least, is correlated with significantly shorter times to thesis completion compared to individual supervision.

  • 37.
    Agné, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Mörkenstam, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Should first-year doctoral students be supervised collectively or individually? Effects on thesis completion and time to completion2018In: Higher Education Research and Development, ISSN 0729-4360, E-ISSN 1469-8366, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 669-682Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether supervision of doctoral students is best pursued individually or collectively is a recurring but unresolved question in debates on higher education. The rarity of longitudinal data and the common usage of qualitative methods to analyse a limited number of cases have left the effectiveness of either model largely untested. To assist with overcoming these problems, this paper reports on a study of 145 individuals admitted to a specific doctoral programme between 1991 and 2014. It analyses the effects of either individual or collective supervision during the first year of the programme on the probability of thesis completion and the time to thesis completion. Group means, Cox regressions, Kaplan–Meir curves and Ordinary Least Square regressions are calculated on the basis of the number of months spent by each doctoral student in the programme without defending a thesis. Studied in these ways, it appears that collective supervision in the first year significantly increases the probability of thesis completion and decreases the time to thesis completion. Collective supervision may have this effect as it enhances peer learning, creates a wider academic learning context, allows doctoral students to gradually acquire the values and behaviours of a research practice community and reduces the risk of premature selection of permanent supervisors.

  • 38. Ahlgreen, Mette
    et al.
    Dahlerup, DrudeStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Nordic BRYT-Project: final report1990Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ahlén, Anton
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Unconditional Conditions: A Study of How Civic Integration Policies Affect Migration Flows in Europe2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade, there has been a diffusion of civic integration policies in Europe, which

    requires immigrants by certain category of entry to accomplish integration tests for

    acquisition of residence. Despite a flurry of literature based on civic integration policies,

    attention drawn to the implication of these policies has been quite rare. This thesis examines

    how civic integration strategies associate with immigration, and tests if civic integration

    policies are connected to variations of immigration by certain category of entry. I argue in

    this thesis that the conditional factor in civic integration policies creates a barrier for affected

    migrants and their possibility to gain long term residence in the host country. Based on

    theories of immigrant integration that relate civic integration to the backlash against

    multiculturalism in Europe, the thesis emphasize a reasoning in which the push for internal

    inclusion seems to be associated with excluding implications. The result presented here

    shows that there are connections between the extension of civic integration policies and

    reduced family and labour immigration between 2004 and 2011. The connection between the

    variables can however not be discerned from other integration requirements. The main

    concern is the lack of harmonized data, which obstructs the possibility to test for causality

    and to draw generalizing conclusions. However, the thesis reveals noteworthy correlations

    between the concepts, which contribute to the research field by connecting civic integration

    to immigration and by showing what implications civic integration policies may result in.

  • 40.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    34 entries including on ideology, Islamic state, personalities, Muslim community, Islamic law and so on2012In: The Oxford Companion to Pakistani History / [ed] Ayesha Jalal, Karachi: Oxford University Press, 2012, , p. 558Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Abdullahi An-Naim on Constitutional and Human Rights Issues1993In: Islamic Law Reform and Human Rights, Oslo: Nordic Human Rights Publications , 1993Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ethnicity abd Separatist Movements in South Asia1993In: Formation of Identity and Dynamics of Conflict in the 1990s, Göteborg: Nordnes , 1993Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Exit, Voice and Citizenship1997In: International Migration, Immobility and Development: Multidisciplinary Perspectives, Oxford and New York: Berg Publishers , 1997Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Group Representation in a Democracy?2007In: Utsikt mot utveckling: Equal Representation. A Challenge to Democracy and Democracy Promotion, no 29, p. 73-90Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Hamdard1995In: Encyclopedia of the Modern Islamic World, New York: Oxford University Press , 1995Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Politics of Ethncity, and the Rise of Separatist Movements in South Asia1992In: When Democracy Makes Sense, Uppsala: AKUT , 1992Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Religious Nationalism and Sikhism1996In: Questioning the Secular State: The Worldwide Resurgence of Religion in Politics, London: Hurst & Company , 1996Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sikherna och sikhisk nationalism1994In: Stat, Nation och Nationalism i Asien, Uppsala: Sällskapet för asienstudier , 1994Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    South Asia1999In: Islam Outside the Arab World, Richmond: Curzon Press , 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Ahmed, Ishtiaq
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sydasiatisk islam: Konfronation mellan gamla värderingar och nya realitet1994In: Majoritetens Islam: Om Muslimer utanför Arabvärlden, Stockholm: Arena , 1994Chapter in book (Other academic)
1234567 1 - 50 of 1575
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