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  • 1.
    Ahlin Sundman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Signs of sinusitis in times of urbanization in Viking Age-early Medieval Sweden2013Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, nr 12, s. 4457-4465Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence and possible negative impact on sinus health of living conditions in rural and urban environments in Viking Age (AD 800–1050) and Early Medieval Sweden (AD 1050–1200) is investigated. Skeletal samples from 32 rural settlements in the Mälaren Valley (AD 750–1200) and burials in the nearby proto-urban port of trade Birka (AD 750–960) are examined. Based on the diagnostic criteria for maxillary sinusitis used in earlier studies, the results show that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of signs of sinusitis between the two materials (i.e. the Mälaren Valley versus Birka). Consequently, this provides no evidence that living in a proto-urban environment had a negative impact on sinus health. However, when compared with previously studied samples from the early medieval town Sigtuna, dated to AD 970–1100, the populations of the Mälaren Valley and Birka show significantly lower frequencies of bone changes interpreted as chronic maxillary sinusitis (95%, 70% and 82% respectively). This implies that the urban environment of Sigtuna could have led to impaired sinus health. There is also a significant difference between males and females in the Birka material, in which more females (100%) than males (68%) were affected. A gender based differentiation in work tasks is suggested by this, or exposure to environmental risk factors that affect sinus health. No difference between males and females could be detected in the samples from the Mälaren Valley and Sigtuna.

  • 2. Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019Inngår i: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, nr 2, s. 210-231Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400–550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The ‘efficient trauma’ distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ida
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gravar i Gränslandet: En osteoarkeologisk jämförelse mellan gravfält från yngre järnåldern i Västmanland2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Köping is a small town in Västmanland, which is situated in the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and in the southeast of Bergslagen. Köping was established and received its rights as a town in 1474. However, archaeological findings showthat Köping was a settlement in late prehistoric and early historic periods and continued to be an important place up until recent times. Due to the location Köping was a marketplace with connections and good fairways from all directions and most of all by LakeMälaren. Ancient monuments and remains indicate thatKöping were well established in the early Iron Age and mainly in the Vendel era in 550-800 A.D, which is the era in focus here. Even though there are many archaeological remains in and around Köping very little research has been done. There have been several excavations but there have been few further studies and close to no osteological analyzes. This paper will deal with four burial grounds which all were mostly excavated in the first half of the 20thcentury, and are briefly reported. The burial sites are all located in Köping with at the most 5 km from each other, and were all used during the Vendel era. Two of the sites, Jämmertuna and Kramsta, mainly have stone-settings with cremated bones. One of the sites is located next to a great tumulus called Ströbohög, and consists of smaller mounds and stone-settings. All with cremated bones. The last one is a burial site that is called Norsa which consists of both stone-settings with cremated bones and also burials containing boatgraves and chamber tombs. All of these burial customs are common in Mälardalen during this time. What is interesting is the location, inhumation of the cemeteriesand also that they have not beenused for a long period of time. A comparative study is presented of a similar butlarger site in Tuna in Badelunda, Västerås, which is located about 40 km from Köping. This will be an osteoarchaeological study with the purpose to understand this characterof the areaduring this time as the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and as a part of Bergslagen. There seems to be a difference regarding the customs and who are represented in the burial ground even though they are from the same time and place, thereforethere will also be a comparisonbetween the different sites regarding the human remains and burial customs.The difference is seen mainly in the individuals, regarding both the male and female presence and also regarding the animals represented in the different graves. This may be connected to aborderlandphenomenonwere different traditions and customs were mixed and assimilated.This study contributeswith more knowledge of the time and place, both within the town and to Mälardalen/Bergslagenin general.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Ida
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gravar i Gränslandet: En osteoarkeologisk jämförelse mellan gravfält från yngre järnåldern i Västmanland2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Köping is a small town in Västmanland, which is situated in the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and in the southeast of Bergslagen. Köping was established and received its rights as a town in 1474. However, archaeological findings show that Köping was a settlement in late prehistoric and early historic periods and continued to be an important place up until recent times. Due to the location Köping was a marketplace with connections and good fairways from all directions and most of all by Lake Mälaren. Ancient monuments and remains indicate that Köping were well established in the early Iron Age and mainly in the Vendel era in 550-800 A.D, which is the era in focus here. Even though there are many archaeological remains in and around Köping very little research has been done. There have been several excavations but there have been few further studies and close to no osteological analyzes. This paper will deal with four burial grounds which all were mostly excavated in the first half of the 20th century, and are briefly reported. The burial sites are all located in Köping with at the most 5 km from each other, and were all used during the Vendel era. Two of the sites, Jämmertuna and Kramsta, mainly have stone-settings with cremated bones. One of the sites is located next to a great tumulus called Ströbohög, and consists of smaller mounds and stone-settings. All with cremated bones. The last one is a burial site that is called Norsa which consists of both stone-settings with cremated bones and also burials containing boatgraves and chamber tombs. All of these burial customs are common in Mälardalen during this time. What is interesting is the location, inhumation of the cemeteries and also that they have not been used for a long period of time. A comparative study is presented of a similar but larger site in Tuna in Badelunda, Västerås, which is located about 40 km from Köping. This will be an osteoarchaeological study with the purpose to understand this character of the area during this time as the westernmost part of Lake Mälaren and as a part of Bergslagen. There seems to be a difference regarding the customs and who are represented in the burial ground even though they are from the same time and place, therefore there will also be a comparison between the different sites regarding the human remains and burial customs. The difference is seen mainly in the individuals, regarding both the male and female presence and also regarding the animals represented in the different graves. This may be connected to a borderland phenomenon were different traditions and customs were mixed and assimilated. This study contributes with more knowledge of the time and place, both within the town and to Mälardalen/Bergslagen in general. 

  • 5.
    Apel, Jan
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Lund University, Sweden.
    Wallin, Paul
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Possnert, Göran
    Early Holocene human population events on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea (9200-3800 cal. BP)2018Inngår i: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 465, s. 276-286Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The summed probability distribution of 162 radiocarbon dates from Gotland was analysed with reference to archaeological and environmental data in order to evaluate possible variations in settlement intensity on the island. The data indicated variations in demographic development on the island, with probably several different colonization events and external influences; the pioneer settlement reached the island around 9200 cal. BP. After the initial colonization, the radiocarbon dates were rather evenly distributed until around 7700–7600 cal. BP, then there was a drop in the number of dates between 8300 and 8000 cal. BP that may be associated with the 8200 cold event. A marked decline in the number of dates between 7600 and 6000 cal. BP may be associated initially with the Littorina I transgression, but this transgression cannot explain why the Late Mesolithic period is not well represented on Gotland: the climatic development was favourable but did not result in increased human activity. The number of radiocarbon dates indicated that the population size remained low until around 6000 cal. BP, after which there was a gradual increase that reached a first ‘threshold’ after 5600 cal. BP and a second ‘threshold’ after 4500 cal. BP. The first apparent population increase was associated with the appearance of the Funnel Beaker Culture (FBC) and the second with Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) complexes. A decline in the number of dates occurred after 4300 cal. BP, i.e. towards the Late Neolithic. There was an association between the frequency distributions of the radiocarbon dates and the number of stray finds from different time periods but any correlation was not straightforward.

  • 6.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A honfoglalás és kora Árpád-kori állattartás régészeti emlékei [Archaeological evidence of animal keeping in the time of the Hungarian Conquest and Period of the Árpád Dynasty]2017Inngår i: Hétköznapok a honfoglalás korában / [ed] Petkes Zsolt, Sudár Balázs, Helikon Kiadó , 2017, s. 52-58Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 7.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    A régészeti állattan "állatorvosi lova"2018Inngår i: Sötét idők túlélői: A kontinuitás fogalma, kutatásának módszerei az 5–11. századi Kárpát-medence régészetében: 2014-ben Debrecenben megrendezett konferencia kiadványa / [ed] Tamara Katalin Hága, Barbara Kolozsi, Debrecen: Déri Múzeum Régészeti Tár , 2018, s. 83-107Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 8.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal Remains in the Avar cemetery of Szegvár-Szőlőkalja2018Inngår i: Lebenswelten zwischen Archäologie und Geschichte: Festschrift für Falko Daim zu seinem 65. Geburtstag / [ed] Jörg Drauschke et al., Mainz: Verlag des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums , 2018, s. 43-56Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 9.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Archaeology in Hungary 1948–19892017Inngår i: Archaeology of the Communist Era: A Political History of Archaeology of the 20th Century / [ed] Ludomir R. Lozny, New York: Springer, 2017, s. 195-233Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 10.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    "Forever young": neoteny and design2018Inngår i: Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien, Serie A., ISSN 0255-0091, nr 120, s. 19-30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The evolutionary relevance of neoteny, the concept that adults displaying youthful proportions evoke caregiving instincts, has frequently been questioned. The biological roots of the problem lead to the expression of age, sex and inheritance in size and shape. Formalist interpretations, however, can be misleading as the idea itself is anthropocentric. This weakness (in natural science) makes historic reflections on neoteny more interesting in material culture shaped by humans themselves. Archaeozoological examples include animal breeds, especially dogs. The attraction to "youthful" proportions also seems to have been exploited in both the creative and applied arts. Researchers of this eminently interdisciplinary subject cannot ignore overarching questions regarding complex and mutual interactions between nature and culture.

  • 11.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Génmódosított állatok nyomában2019Inngår i: Régészeti nyomozások Magyarországon 2.0 / [ed] Gábor Ilon, Budapest: Martin Opitz Kiadó , 2019, s. 33-44Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 12.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hungarian grey cattle: Parallels in constituting animal and human identities2018Inngår i: Interspecies Interactions: Animals and Humans between the Middle Ages and Modernity / [ed] Sarah Cockram, Andrew Wells, London: Routledge, 2018, s. 190-213Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 13.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hunting injuries in prehistoric game2016Inngår i: Southeast Europe and Anatolia in prehistory : Essays in honor of Vassil Nikolov on his 65th anniversary / [ed] K. Bacvarov, R. Gleser, Bonn: Verlag Dr. Rudolf Habelt GMBH, 2016, s. 501-508Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 14.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    "Kleine Fische, gute Fische": But Sturgeon is Great2018Inngår i: Genius Loci: Laszlovszky 60 / [ed] Dora Mérai, Ágnes Drosztmér, Kyra Lyublyanovics, Judith Rasson, Zsuzsanna Papp Reed, András Vadas, Csilla Zatykó, Budapest: Archaeolingua Foundation , 2018, s. 121-125Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 15.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Like a Headless Chicken: Meaning, Medium and Context in Medieval Urban Taphonomy2017Inngår i: Animaltown: beasts in medieval urban space / [ed] Alice M. Choyke, Gerhard Jaritz, Oxford: BAR Publishing , 2017, s. 19-26Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 16.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Resurrecting Roe Deer: Skeletal Weight Ratios At Prehistoric Paks–Gyapa, Hungary2017Inngår i: From Hunter-Gatherers to Farmers: Human adaptations at the end of the Pleistocene and the first part of the Holocene / [ed] Mărgărit, M. and Boroneanț, A., Targoviște: Editura Cetatea de Scaun , 2017, s. 465-481Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 17.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The ghost in the corridor…: Some remarks on “Animal Secondary Products”, edited by Haskel J. Greenfield2015Inngår i: Germania, ISSN 0016-8874, Vol. 93, s. 233-245Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 18.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    The palaeopathology of wild mammals in archaeology = Vadon élő emlősállatok betegségei a régészetben2016Inngår i: Archeometriai Műhely, ISSN 1786-271X, Vol. 13, nr 1, s. 19-30Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Domestication is known to have increased animal morbidity. Wild animals, however, should not be looked upon romantically like Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s “noble sauvage”, untainted by civilisation. Rare pathological lesions found on the bones of wild animals in archaeozoological assemblages, they offer valuable information both from a zoological and a archaeological point of view. In addition to discussing problems of sampling, this paper is a review of major factors such as taphonomy, environment, and heritability that determine the manifestation of disease in wild animals in archaeological assemblages. A simple classification, specifically developed for wild animals, is presented that helps better understand these conditions. Numerous examples from both the author’s own work and the broad base of international literature (especially on Europe and the Southwest Asia) are cited to help illustrate how disease is manifested on the bones of wild animals recovered from a variety of archaeological periods. The results of this paper show that although domestication undoubtedly brought about an increase in animal morbidity, depending on the chances of survival of a game species and the functional importance of the body part affected, a variety of pathological lesions regularly occur on the remains of wild animals as well.

  • 19.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Zooarchaeology in the Carpathian Basin and adjacent areas2017Inngår i: The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology / [ed] Umberto Albarella, Mauro Rizzetto, Hannah Russ, Kim Vickers, Sarah Viner-Daniels, New York: Oxford University Press, 2017, s. 99-112Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The Carpathian Basin, situated between the Alps, the Carpathians, and the Dinaric Alps, has been a geographically and culturally diverse area throughout its history. Research intensity in all periods and places is likewise heterogeneous. A complete review of animal–human relationships is, thus, impossible. Following a historical overview of research, characteristic examples of animal exploitation between the Neolithic and the early eighteenth century will be highlighted. Special emphasis is placed on the way migrations and imperial politics impacted the composition of animal bone assemblages. The role of animals in self-representation and other forms of symbolic communication are also considered.

  • 20.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Zoological observations made on the brass jug from the Avar cemetery of Budakalász2017Inngår i: Die frühbyzantinische Messingkanne mit Jagdszenen von Budakalász (Ungarn) / [ed] Tivadar Vida, Budapest: MTA BTK Régészeti Intézet , 2017, s. 229-242Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 21.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bonsall, Clive
    Herd mentality2018Inngår i: Social Dimensions of Food in the Prehistoric Balkans / [ed] Social dimensMaria Ivanova, Bogdan Athanassov, Vanya Petrova, Desislava Takorova, Philipp W. Stockhammer, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 22.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Choyke, Alice M.
    Reynolds, Ffion
    Stag do: ritual implications of antler use in prehistory2017Inngår i: The Neolithic of Europe: papers in honour of Alasdair Whittle / [ed] Penny Bickle, Vicki Cummings, Daniela Hofmann, Joshua Pollard, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2017, s. 107-119Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 23.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gál, Erika
    Ottoman Turkish influences on animal exploitation in 16th-17th century Hungary2018Inngår i: Archaeozoology of the Near East XII: proceedings of the 12th international symposium of the ICAZ Archaeozoology of Southwest Asia and Adjacent Areas Working Group, Groningen Institute of Archaeology, June 14-15 2015 / [ed] Canan Çakırlar, Jwana Chahoud, Rémi Berthon, Susan Pilaar Birch, Groningen: Barkhuis Publishing & University of Groningen , 2018, s. 191-206Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lisk, Elicia
    Mammalian Remains2018Inngår i: Quedem Reports, E-ISSN 0793-4289, Vol. 10, s. 83-117Artikkel, omtale (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 25.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lisk, Elicia
    Zohar, Irit
    Non-mammalian Vertebrate Remains2018Inngår i: Quedem Reports, ISSN 0793-4289, Vol. 10, s. 119-128Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nyerges, Éva Ágnes
    Prehistoric Animal Remains from Grotta Scaloria2016Inngår i: Archaeology of Grotta Scaloria: Ritual in Neolithic Southeast Italy / [ed] Ernestine S. Elster, Eugenia Isetti, John Robb, Antonella Traverso, Los Angeles: University of New Mexico Press , 2016, s. 75-90Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Swift, Keith
    Coleman Carter, Joseph
    Animal Remains from the Sanctuary and Adjacent Areas at Pantanello2018Inngår i: The chora of Metaponto 7: The Greek Sanctuary at Pantanello, volume I : The excavation and site / [ed] Joseph Coleman Carter, Keith Swift, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2018, s. 447-464Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 28.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal palaeopathology: Between archaeology and veterinary science2020Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 29.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal remains from the Langobard cemetery of Ménfőcsanak (NW Hungary)2015Inngår i: Antaeus, ISSN 0238-0218, Vol. 33, s. 249-264Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 30.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Animal remains from the late medieval castellum of Őcsény-Oltovány, Southern Hungary2016Inngår i: “per sylvam et per lacus nimios” The Medieval and Ottoman Period in Southern Transdanubia, Southwest Hungary: The Contribution of the Natural Sciences / [ed] Gyöngyi Kovács, Csilla Zatykó, Budapest: Institute of Archaeology Research Centre for the Humanities Hungarian Academy of Sciences , 2016, s. 155-176Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    “Every skin teeth aint a laugh”: Medieval leopard find from Hungary2015Inngår i: Hungarian Archaeology, ISSN 2416-0296, s. 1-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The unexpected recovery of a worked skull fragment from a large male leopard at the medieval urban site of Segesd–Pékóföld during the 1980s raises important questions. These concern zoogeographical distribution, as well as issues of manufacturing, status, and the circulation of luxury goods. In recent years these aspects of the special artefact could be revisited on the basis of an increasing body of data and new insights into the symbolic use of this artefact in high-status self-representation.

  • 32.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Halaf Period Animal Remains from Tell Aqab, Northeastern Syria2016Inngår i: Bones and Identity: Zooarchaeological Approaches to Reconstructing Social and Cultural Landscapes in Southwest Asia / [ed] Nimrod Marom, Reuven Yeshurun, Lior Weissbrod, Guy Bar-Oz, Oxbow Books, 2016, s. 125-155Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A small assemblage (NISP=3,217) of 5th millennium BC Halaf and subsequent Ubaid Period animal bones and molluscan remains was recovered during the 1975 and 1976 field seasons at the site of Tell Aqab (Jezirah province, northeastern Syria) some 100 km west of the Tigris River forming the current border between Turkey and Syria. The ca. 9.5 m high mound is located alongside a small seasonal stream that forms part of the Wadi Dara drainage system. Excavations were carried out by a University of Edinburgh team following a survey in the Khabur River floodplain. The purpose of excavations at the time was to clarify regional patterning in ceramic assemblages during the periods for which Tell Aqab had well-stratified layers, especially the Middle Halaf Period.

    Unsurprisingly, the poorly preserved faunal material was dominated by the bone fragments of small ruminants, evidently sheep and goat. Remains of cattle and pigs were also recovered. Hunting was indicated by the sporadically occurring remains of wild ass and gazelle, possibly also contributing to the heavily fragmented small ruminant remains. High fragmentation precluded the detailed metric analysis of bones. Meanwhile, in addition to the number of identifiable specimens (NISP) individual bone weights were taken in an effort to better appraise the dietary contributions of the species identified. Adding faunal information to this archaeological work contributes yet another data point to the map of prehistoric animal exploitation in the Fertile Crescent.

  • 33.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hinnies in sync?2019Inngår i: Tidens landskap: En vänbok till Anders Andrén / [ed] Cecilia Ljung, Anna Andreasson Sjögren, Ingrid Berg, Elin Engström, Ann-Mari Hållans Stenholm, Kristina Jonsson, Alison Klevnäs, Linda Qviström, Torun Zachrisson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2019, s. 30-32Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 34.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Johnny Karlsson: Spill: Om djur, hantverk och nätverk i mälarområdet under vikingatid och medeltid [[Waste: Osseous Materials, Craft and Networks in the Mälaren Region during the Middle Ages]2018Inngår i: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 26, s. 254-261Artikkel, omtale (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    János Matolcsi and the development of archaeozoology [Matolcsi János és a régészeti állattan fejlődése]2015Inngår i: Hungarian Grey, Racka, Mangalitsa [Szürkék, rackák, mangalicák]: Papers presented at the international conference honouring János Matolcsi, 25–26 November 2013 / [ed] Andrea Kőrösi, Ágnes Szotyori-Nagy, Budapest: Museum and Library of Hungarian Agriculture , 2015, s. 29-36Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 36.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Környezet okozta állatbetegségek a régészetben2016Inngår i: Természet Világa, ISSN 0040-3717, Vol. 147, s. 40-45Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 37.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lóhalál [They shoot horses, do they?]: A nagytermetű háziállatok levágásának egyik hagyományos módja [A traditional way of slaughtering large livestock]2016Inngår i: Beatus homo qui invenit Sapientiam: Ünnepi kötet Tomka Péter 75. születésnapjára / [ed] Teréz Csécs, Miklós Takács, Győr: Lekri Group Kft. , 2016, s. 71-76Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 38.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Measuring skeletal weight ratios of red deer in archaeology2019Inngår i: Mikroszkóppal, feltárásokkal, mintavételezéssel, kutatásokkal, az archeometria, a geoarcheológia és a régészet szolgálatában / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Katalin T. Bíró, Pál Sümegi, Tünde Törőcsik, Szeged: Geolitera , 2019, s. 35-48Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 39.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Szívszorító hasonlóságok: Gondolatok a rituális állatvágás kapcsán2015Inngår i: Ókor, ISSN 1417-8532, Vol. 4, s. 77-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 40.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Súlyos állatságok [Weighty matters]: A hatvani kultúra húsfogyasztása Jászdózsa-Kápolnahalmon [Meat consumption during the Hatvan culture occupation at Jászdózsa-Kápolnahalom, Hungary]2016Inngår i: Tiscium: a Jász-Nagykun-Szolnok megyei múzeumok évkönyve, ISSN 1217-4165, Vol. XXV, s. 303-307Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Taphonomy and Disease Prevalence in Animal Palaeopathology: The Proverbial “Veterinary Horse”2018Inngår i: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, s. 185-207Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 42.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Gál, Erika
    Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology : Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 2018Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Animals have always been integral to culture. Their interaction with humans has intensified since the onset of domestication resulting in higher incidences of animal disease due to human intervention. At the same time, human care has counterbalanced pressures of natural selection, reducing morbidity among wild animals. Prior to the emergence of a veterinary record, animal disease can only be traced by analyzing pathological symptoms on excavated animal remains. This volume presents a collection of studies in the discipline of animal palaeopathology. An international team of experts offer reviews of animal welfare at ancient settlements from both prehistoric and historic periods across Eurasia.

    Several chapters are devoted to the diseases of dog and horse, two animals of prominent emotional importance in many civilizations. Curious phenomena observed on the bones of poultry, sheep, pig and even fish are discussed within their respective cultural contexts. Many poorly healed bones are suggestive of neglect in the case of ordinary livestock. On the other hand, a great degree of compassion may be presumed behind the long survival of seriously ill companion animals. In addition to furthering our better technical understanding of animal disease in the past, this volume also mirrors the diversity of human attitudes towards animals during our millennia-long relationship. Some animal bones show signs of extreme cruelty but others also reveal the great attention paid to the recovery of sick animals. Such attitudes tend to be largely hidden yet are characteristic aspects of how people relate to the surrounding world and, ultimately, to each other.

  • 43.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Subsistence Practices in Central and Eastern Europe.2015Inngår i: The Oxford Handbook of Neolithic Europe. / [ed] Chris Fowler, Jan Harding and Daniela Hofmann, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, s. 411-428Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 44.
    Bartosiewicz, László
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Nyerges, Éva A.
    Biller, Anna Z.
    Palaeopathology at the Eneolithic tell settlement of Polyanitsa (Bulgaria) investigated by Sándor Bökönyi2018Inngår i: Care or Neglect? Evidence of Animal Disease in Archaeology: Proceedings of the 6th Meeting of the Animal Palaeopathology Working Group of the International Council for Archaeozoology (ICAZ), Budapest, Hungary, 2016 / [ed] László Bartosiewicz, Erika Gál, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2018, s. 23-44Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 45.
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Halaf Period Animal Remains from Tell Aqab, Northeastern Syria2016Inngår i: Bones and Identity: Zooarchaeological Approaches to Reconstructing Social and Cultural Landscapes in Southwest Asia / [ed] N. Marom et al., Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2016Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A small assemblage (NISP=3,217) of 5th millennium BC Halaf and subsequent UbaidPeriod animal bones and molluscan remains was recovered during the 1975 and 1976field seasons at the site of Tell Aqab (Jezirah province, northeastern Syria) some100 km west of the Tigris River forming the current border between Turkey and Syria. Theca. 9.5 m high mound is located alongside a small seasonal stream that forms part of theWadi Dara drainage system. Excavations were carried out by a University of Edinburghteam following a survey in the Khabur River floodplain. The purpose of excavations atthe time was to clarify regional patterning in ceramic assemblages during the periodsfor which Tell Aqab had well-stratified layers, especially the Middle Halaf Period.Unsurprisingly, the poorly preserved faunal material was dominated by the bonefragments of small ruminants, evidently sheep and goat. Remains of cattle and pigswere also recovered. Hunting was indicated by the sporadically occurring remainsof wild ass and gazelle, possibly also contributing to the heavily fragmented smallruminant remains. High fragmentation precluded the detailed metric analysis of bones.Meanwhile, in addition to the number of identifiable specimens (NISP) individual boneweights were taken in an effort to better appraise the dietary contributions of thespecies identified. Adding faunal information to this archaeological work contributes yetanother data point to the map of prehistoric animal exploitation in the Fertile Crescent.

  • 46. Boethius, Adam
    et al.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Apel, Jan
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet. Lund University, Sweden.
    The importance of freshwater fish in Early Holocene subsistence: Exemplified with the human colonization of the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin2017Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 13, s. 625-634Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the subsistence economy of the Mesolithic pioneers on the island of Gotland in the Baltic basin, in order to evaluate the importance of freshwater fish to the Early Holocene human population. By analysing faunal remains, the distribution of 14C dates and the location of the settlement sites, we argue that earlier assumptions concerning the importance of marine mammals to the early human populations should be reconsidered. We suggest that the pioneering settlers of Gotland relied on fish to a significant extent. Radiocarbon dates taken from human bones are skewed by a freshwater reservoir effect, which can be used as an indirect indication of the significance of freshwater fish. The numerous, overgrowing lakes on the island, with their extensive biomass production and large amounts of freshwater fish, provided an important subsistence base. Even if the faunal assemblages that have survived are dominated by seal bones, the hunting season for seals was limited and the hunters mostly targeted young seals. Thus, the importance of seal have previously been overestimated and it appears that the human use of marine resources on Gotland was more limited and related to raw material needs rather than dietary necessity or specialization. Although presented as a case study; the results highlight the need to identify a freshwater fish diet among ancient foragers on a larger scale, as implications thereof can fundamentally change how foraging societies are perceived.

  • 47. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Cook, Gordon
    Pickard, Catriona
    McSweeney, Kathleen
    Sayle, Kerry
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Radovanovic, Ivana
    Higham, Thomas
    Soficaru, Andrei
    Boroneant, Adina
    Food for Thought: Re-Assessing Mesolithic Diets in the Iron Gates2015Inngår i: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 57, nr 4, s. 689-699Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope ratios of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in human bone collagen are used routinely to aid in the reconstruction of ancient diets. Isotopic analysis of human remains from sites in the Iron Gates section of the Lower Danube Valley has led to conflicting interpretations of Mesolithic diets in this key region of southeast Europe. One view (Bonsall et al. 1997, 2004) is that diets were based mainly on riverine resources throughout the Mesolithic. A competing hypothesis (Nehlich et al. 2010) argues that Mesolithic diets were more varied with at least one Early Mesolithic site showing an emphasis on terrestrial resources, and riverine resources only becoming dominant in the Later Mesolithic. The present article revisits this issue, discussing the stable isotope data in relation to archaeozoological and radiocarbon evidence.

  • 48. Bonsall, Clive
    et al.
    Macklin, Mark
    Boronean, Adina
    Pickard, Catriona
    Bartosiewicz, Laszlo
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Cook, Gordon
    Higham, Thomas
    Rapid climate change and radiocarbon discontinuities in the Mesolithic-Early Neolithic settlement record of the Iron Gates: cause or coincidence?2016Inngår i: Climate and cultural change in prehistoric Europe and the Near East / [ed] Peter F. Biehl, Olivier P. Nieuwenhuyse, Albany: State University of New York, 2016, s. 195-210Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 49.
    Economou, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Arkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Ancient-DNA reveals an Asian type of Mycobacterium leprae in medieval Scandinavia2013Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, nr 1, s. 465-470Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Its impact on human populations and societies of the past as well as its phylogeographic patterns around the world – at least in modern times – has been well documented. This slow growing bacterium has been shown to exist in distinct ‘SNP types’ that occur in relatively defined parts of the globe. The routes that the disease followed in the past are, however, still uncertain. This study of ancient-DNA typing of archaeological human remains from Sweden dated to early Medieval times provides genetic evidence that a transmission of M. leprae ‘SNP subtype’ 2G – found mainly in Asia – took or had already taken place at that time from the Middle East to Scandinavia. This finding is unique in the history of leprosy in Europe. All human specimens from this continent – both modern and ancient – that have been tested to date showed that the one responsible for the infection strains of M. leprae belong to ‘SNP type’ 3, whereas our results show that there were some European populations that were hosts to bacteria representing ‘SNP type’ 2 of the species as well.

  • 50. Edberg, Rune
    et al.
    Karlsson, Johnny
    Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur, Osteoarkeologiska forskningslaboratoriet.
    Bone skates and young people in Birka and Sigtuna2016Inngår i: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, nr 1, s. 7-16Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    679 bone skates from two important sites in the Stockholm area were examined. Cattle bones dominate in Birka (8th to loth centuries AD), while horse bones are more numerous in Sigtuna (10th to 13th centuries AD). The average length of the skates is c. 20 cm in Birka and c. 22 cm in Sigtuna. It seems that in Birka, bone skating was practiced mostly by children. In Sigtuna it also became popular among adolescents and perhaps young adults. Ethnological analogies strongly support the interpretation of bone skates as toys and sporting equipment.

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