Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 1834
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mercury and silver induce B cell activation and anti-nucleolar autoantibody production in outbred mouse stocks: are environmental factors more important than the susceptibility genes in connection with autoimmunity?2009In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 155, no 1, 117-124 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental and predisposing genetic factors are known to play a crucial role in the development of systemic autoimmune diseases. With respect to the role of environmental factors, it is not known how and to what extent they contribute to the initiation and exacerbation of systemic autoimmunity. In the present study, I considered this issue and asked if environmental factors can induce autoimmunity in the absence of specific susceptible genes. The development of genetically controlled mercury- and silver-induced B cell activation and anti-nucleolar autoantibodies (ANolA) production in genetically heterozygous outbred Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) and Black Swiss mouse stocks were analysed. Four weeks of treatment with both mercury and silver induced a strong B cell activation characterized by increased numbers of splenic antibody-secreting cells of at least one or more immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype(s) in all treated stocks. The three stocks also exhibited a marked increase in the serum IgE levels in response to mercury, but not silver. More importantly, in response to mercury a large numbers of ICR (88%), NMRI (96%) and Black Swiss (100%) mice produced different levels of IgG1 and IgG2a ANolA (a characteristic which is linked strictly to the H-2 genes). Similarly, but at lower magnitudes, treatment with silver also induced the production of IgG1 and IgG2a ANolA in 60% of ICR, 75% of NMRI and 100% of Black Swiss mice. Thus, the findings of this study suggest that long-term exposure to certain environmental factors can activate the immune system to produce autoimmunity per se, without requiring specific susceptible genes.

  • 2.
    Abelein, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Modulation of Alzheimer's amyloid β peptide self-assembly: Insights into molecular mechanisms of peptide aggregation associated with Alzheimer's disease2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Misfolding of proteins and peptides is closely linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, among them Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prominent example of brain diseases. The self-assembly of the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) into amyloid fibrils is one histologic hallmark of AD. A detailed knowledge about the underlying mechanism(s) of Aβ aggregation is crucial for advances toward a fundamental understanding of the disease, which may promote the search for and design of efficient therapeutics. The work presented in this thesis deals with modulation of the aggregation process by various compounds, i.e. small organic molecules (e.g. lacmoid and Congo red), surfactants and metal ions. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of modulator interactions and interference with Aβ and its aggregation pathways. Applying a combination of kinetic and dynamic studies as well as structural investigations we characterized the molecular interactions between Aβ and aggregation modulators in terms of microscopic rate constants, conformational preferences and thermodynamics. An important conclusion is that these modulators form highly dynamic complexes with Aβ, with life-times on the timescale of milliseconds. Despite the similar exchange dynamics, the effect on peptide aggregation is modulator-specific and fibril formation can be accelerated, retarded or inhibited by their interactions. In summary, Aβ self-assembly is governed by microscopic kinetic and dynamic processes that can be altered by aggregation modulators. Further elucidation of these mechanisms is beneficial for the understanding and therapeutic intervention of amyloid diseases.

  • 3.
    Abelein, Axel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Modulation of amyloid β peptide self-assembly: Aggregation mechanisms associated with Alzheimer's disease2013Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Abrahams, Jan Pieter
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jarvet, Juri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia.
    Luo, Jinghui
    Tiiman, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wärmländer, Sebastian K. T. S.
    The hairpin conformation of the amyloid beta peptide is an important structural motif along the aggregation pathway2014In: Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, ISSN 0949-8257, E-ISSN 1432-1327, Vol. 19, no 4-5, 623-634 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The amyloid beta (A beta) peptides are 39-42 residue-long peptides found in the senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. These peptides self-aggregate in aqueous solution, going from soluble and mainly unstructured monomers to insoluble ordered fibrils. The aggregation process(es) are strongly influenced by environmental conditions. Several lines of evidence indicate that the neurotoxic species are the intermediate oligomeric states appearing along the aggregation pathways. This minireview summarizes recent findings, mainly based on solution and solid-state NMR experiments and electron microscopy, which investigate the molecular structures and characteristics of the A beta peptides at different stages along the aggregation pathways. We conclude that a hairpin-like conformation constitutes a common motif for the A beta peptides in most of the described structures. There are certain variations in different hairpin conformations, for example regarding H-bonding partners, which could be one reason for the molecular heterogeneity observed in the aggregated systems. Interacting hairpins are the building blocks of the insoluble fibrils, again with variations in how hairpins are organized in the cross-section of the fibril, perpendicular to the fibril axis. The secondary structure propensities can be seen already in peptide monomers in solution. Unfortunately, detailed structural information about the intermediate oligomeric states is presently not available. In the review, special attention is given to metal ion interactions, particularly the binding constants and ligand structures of A beta complexes with Cu(II) and Zn(II), since these ions affect the aggregation process(es) and are considered to be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying AD pathology.

  • 5.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bolognesi, Benedetta
    Dobson, Christopher M.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Hydrophobicity and conformational change as mechanistic determinants for nonspecific modulators of amyloid β self-assembly2012In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 51, no 1, 126-137 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The link between many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, and the aberrant folding and aggregation of proteins has prompted a comprehensive search for small organic molecules that have the potential to inhibit such processes. Although many compounds have been reported to affect the formation of amyloid fibrils and/or other types of protein aggregates, the mechanisms by which they act are not well understood. A large number of compounds appear to act in a nonspecific way affecting several different amyloidogenic proteins. We describe here a detailed study of the mechanism of action of one representative compound, lacmoid, in the context of the inhibition of the aggregation of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) associated with Alzheimer's disease. We show that lacmoid binds Aβ(1-40) in a surfactant-like manner and counteracts the formation of all types of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) aggregates. On the basis of these and previous findings, we are able to rationalize the molecular mechanisms of action of nonspecific modulators of protein self-assembly in terms of hydrophobic attraction and the conformational preferences of the polypeptide.

  • 6.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The zinc ion – a minimal chaperone mimicking agent forretardation of amyloid β peptide fibril formationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Zinc as chaperone-mimicking agent for retardation of amyloid beta peptide fibril formation2015In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 112, no 17, 5407-5412 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal ions have emerged to play a key role in the aggregation process of amyloid beta (A beta) peptide that is closely related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. A detailed understanding of the underlying mechanistic process of peptide-metal interactions, however, has been challenging to obtain. By applying a combination of NMR relaxation dispersion and fluorescence kinetics methods we have investigated quantitatively the thermodynamic A beta-Zn2+ binding features as well as how Zn2+ modulates the nucleation mechanism of the aggregation process. Our results show that, under near-physiological conditions, substoichiometric amounts of Zn2+ effectively retard the generation of amyloid fibrils. A global kinetic profile analysis reveals that in the absence of zinc A beta(40) aggregation is driven by a monomer-dependent secondary nucleation process in addition to fibril-end elongation. In the presence of Zn2+, the elongation rate is reduced, resulting in reduction of the aggregation rate, but not a complete inhibition of amyloid formation. We show that Zn2+ transiently binds to residues in the N terminus of the monomeric peptide. A thermodynamic analysis supports a model where the N terminus is folded around the Zn2+ ion, forming a marginally stable, short-lived folded A beta(40) species. This conformation is highly dynamic and only a few percent of the peptide molecules adopt this structure at any given time point. Our findings suggest that the folded A beta(40)-Zn2+ complex modulates the fibril ends, where elongation takes place, which efficiently retards fibril formation. In this conceptual framework we propose that zinc adopts the role of a minimal antiaggregation chaperone for A beta(40).

  • 8.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jarvet, Jüri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. The National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Estonia.
    Barth, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ionic Strength Modulation of the Free Energy Landscape of A beta(40) Peptide Fibril Formation2016In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, no 21, 6893-6902 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein misfolding and formation of cross-beta structured amyloid fibrils are linked to, many neurodegenerative disorders. Although recently developed,quantitative approaches have started to reveal the molecular nature of self-assembly and fibril formation of proteins and peptides, it is yet unclear how these self-organization events are precisely modulated by microenvironmental factors, which are known to strongly affect the macroscopic aggregation properties. Here, we characterize the explicit effect of ionic strength on the microscopic aggregation rates of amyloid beta peptide (A beta 40) self-association, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We found that physiological ionic strength accelerates A beta 40 aggregation kinetics by promoting surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation reactions. This promoted catalytic effect can be assigned to shielding of electrostatic repulsion between Monomers on the fibril surface or between the fibril surface itself and monomeric peptides. Furthermore, we observe the formation of two different beta-structured states with =similar but distinct spectroscopic features, which can be assigned to an off-pathway immature state (F-beta*) and a mature stable State (F-beta), where salt favors formation of the F-beta fibril morphology. Addition of salt to preformed F-beta* accelerates transition to F-beta, underlining the dynamic nature of A beta 40 fibrils in solution. On the basis of,these results we suggest a model where salt decreases the free-energy barrier for A beta 40 folding to the F-beta state, favoring the buildup of the mature fibril morphology while omitting competing, energetically less favorable structural states.

  • 9.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling
    Nielsen, Søren Bang
    Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard
    Christiansen, Gunna
    Pedersen, Jan Skov
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Otzen, Daniel E.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Formation of dynamic soluble surfactant-induced amyloid β peptide aggregation intermediates2013In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 288, no 32, 23518-23528 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intermediate amyloidogenic states along the amyloid β peptide (Aβ) aggregation pathway have been shown to be linked to neurotoxicity. To shed more light on the different structures that may arise during Aβ aggregation, we here investigate surfactant-induced Aβ aggregation. This process leads to co-aggregates featuring a β-structure motif that is characteristic for mature amyloid-like structures. Surfactants induce secondary structure in Aβ in a concentration-dependent manner, from predominantly random coil at low surfactant concentration, via β-structure to the fully formed α-helical state at high surfactant concentration. The β-rich state is the most aggregation-prone as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals initial globular structures of surfactant-Aβ co-aggregated oligomers and formation of elongated fibrils during a slow aggregation process. Alongside this slow (minutes to hours time scale) fibrillation process, much faster dynamic exchange (k(ex) ∼1100 s(-1)) takes place between free and co-aggregate-bound peptide. The two hydrophobic segments of the peptide are directly involved in the chemical exchange and interact with the hydrophobic part of the co-aggregates. Our findings suggest a model for surfactant-induced aggregation where free peptide and surfactant initially co-aggregate to dynamic globular oligomers and eventually form elongated fibrils. When interacting with β-structure promoting substances, such as surfactants, Aβ is kinetically driven toward an aggregation-prone state.

  • 10.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Corrigendum to “Transient small molecule interactions kinetically modulate amyloid β peptide self-assembly” [FEBS Lett. 586 (2012) 3991–3995]2013In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 587, no 9, 1452-1452 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Abelein, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lang, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lendel, Christofer
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Transient small molecule interactions kinetically modulate amyloid beta peptide self-assembly2012In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 586, no 22, 3991-3995 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Small organic molecules, like Congo red and lacmoid, have been shown to modulate the self-assembly of the amyloid beta peptide (A beta). Here, we show that A beta forms NMR invisible non-toxic co-aggregates together with lacmoid as well as Congo red. We find that the interaction involves two distinct kinetic processes and at every given time point only a small fraction of A beta is in the co-aggregate. These weak transient interactions kinetically redirect the aggregation prone A beta from self-assembling into amyloid fibrils. These findings suggest that even such weak binders might be effective as therapeutics against pathogenic protein aggregation.

  • 12. Abhiman, Saraswathi
    et al.
    Daub, Carsten O
    Sonnhammer, Erik L L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Prediction of function divergence in protein families using the substitution rate variation parameter alpha.2006In: Mol Biol Evol, ISSN 0737-4038, Vol. 23, no 7, 1406-13 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13. Abhiman, Saraswathi
    et al.
    Sonnhammer, Erik L L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Large-scale prediction of function shift in protein families with a focus on enzymatic function.2005In: Proteins, ISSN 1097-0134, Vol. 60, no 4, 758-68 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14. Acevedo, Nathalie
    et al.
    Bornacelly, Adriana
    Mercado, Dilia
    Unneberg, Per
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mittermann, Irene
    Valenta, Rudolf
    Kennedy, Malcolm
    Scheynius, Annika
    Caraballo, Luis
    Genetic Variants in CHIA and CHI3L1 Are Associated with the IgE Response to the Ascaris Resistance Marker ABA-1 and the Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 12016In: plos one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 12, e0167453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helminth infections and allergic diseases are associated with IgE hyperresponsiveness but the genetics of this phenotype remain to be defined. Susceptibility to Ascaris lumbricoides infection and antibody levels to this helminth are associated with polymorphisms in locus 13q33-34. We aimed to explore this and other genomic regions to identify genetic variants associated with the IgE responsiveness in humans. Forty-eight subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, with extreme values of specific IgE to Ascaris and ABA-1, a resistance marker of this nematode, were selected for targeted resequencing. Burden analyses were done comparing extreme groups for IgE values. One-hundred one SNPs were genotyped in 1258 individuals of two well-characterized populations from Colombia and Sweden. Two low-frequency coding variants in the gene encoding the Acidic Mammalian Chitinase (CHIA rs79500525, rs139812869, tagged by rs10494133) were found enriched in high IgE responders to ABA-1 and confirmed by genetic association analyses. The SNP rs4950928 in the Chitinase 3 Like 1 gene (CHI3L1) was associated with high IgE to ABA-1 in Colombians and with high IgE to Bet v 1 in the Swedish population. CHIA rs10494133 and ABDH13 rs3783118 were associated with IgE responses to Ascaris. SNPs in the Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily Member 13b gene (TNFSF13B) encoding the cytokine B cell activating Factor were associated with high levels of total IgE in both populations. This is the first report on the association between low-frequency and common variants in the chitinases- related genes CHIA and CHI3L1 with the intensity of specific IgE to ABA-1 in a population naturally exposed to Ascaris and with Bet v 1 in a Swedish population. Our results add new information about the genetic influences of human IgE responsiveness; since the genes encode for enzymes involved in the immune response to parasitic infections, they could be helpful for understanding helminth immunity and allergic responses. We also confirmed that TNFSF13B has an important and conserved role in the regulation of total IgE levels, which supports potential evolutionary links between helminth immunity and allergic response.

  • 15. Adase, Christopher A.
    et al.
    Draheim, Roger R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Manson, Michael D.
    The Residue Composition of the Aromatic Anchor of the Second Transmembrane Helix Determines the Signaling Properties of the Aspartate/Maltose Chemoreceptor Tar of Escherichia coli2012In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 51, no 9, 1925-1932 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Repositioning of the tandem aromatic residues (Trp-209 and Tyr-210) at the cytoplasmic end of the second transmembrane helix (TM2) modulates the signal output of the aspartate/maltose chemoreceptor of Escherichia coli (Tar(Ec)). Here, we directly assessed the effect of the residue composition of the aromatic anchor by studying the function of a library of Tar(Ec) variants that possess all possible combinations of Ala, Phe, Tyr, and Trp at positions 209 and 210. We identified three important properties of the aromatic anchor. First, a Trp residue at position 209 was required to maintain clockwise (CW) signal output in the absence of adaptive methylation, but adaptive methylation restored the ability of all of the mutant receptors to generate CW rotation. Second, when the aromatic anchor was replaced with tandem Ala residues, signaling was less compromised than when an Ala residue occupied position 209 and an aromatic residue occupied position 210. Finally, when Trp was: present at position 209, the identity of the residue at position 210 had little effect on baseline signal output or aspartate chemotaxis, although maltose taxis was significantly affected by some substitutions at position 210. All of the mutant receptors we constructed supported some level of aspartate and maltose taxis in semisolid agar swim plates, but those without Trp at position 209 were overmethylated in their baseline signaling state. These results show the importance of the cytoplasmic aromatic anchor of TM2 in maintaining the baseline Tar(Ec) signal output and responsiveness to attractant signaling.

  • 16. Adase, Christopher A.
    et al.
    Draheim, Roger R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Goethe University .
    Rueda, Garrett
    Desai, Raj
    Manson, Michael D.
    Residues at the Cytoplasmic End of Transmembrane Helix 2 Determine the Signal Output of the Tar(Ec) Chemoreceptor2013In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 52, no 16, 2729-2738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Baseline signal output and communication between the periplasmic and cytoplasmic domains of the Escherichia colt aspartate chemoreceptor Tar(Ec) are both strongly influenced by residues at the C-terminus of transmembrane helix 2 (TM2). In particular, the cytoplasmic aromatic anchor, composed of residues Trp-209 and Tyr-210 in wild type Tar(Ec) is important for determining the CheA kinase-stimulating activity of the receptor and its ability to respond to chemoeffector-induced stimuli. Here, we have studied the effect on Tar(Ec) function of the six residue sequence at positions 207-212 Moving various combinations of aromatic residues among these positions generates substantial changes M receptor activity. Trp has the largest effect on function, both in maintaining normal activity and in altering activity when it is moved. Tyr has a weaker effect, and Phe has the weakest; however, all three aromatic residues can alter signal output when they are placed in novel positions. We also find that Gly-211 plays an important role in receptor function, perhaps because of the flexibility it introduces into the TM2-HAMP domain connector. The conservation of this Gly residue in the high-abundance chemoreceptors of E. coli and Salmonella enterica suggests that it may be important for the nuanced, bidirectional transmembrane signaling that occurs in these proteins.

  • 17.
    Adrait, Annie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öhrström, Maria
    Barra, Anne-Laure
    The High Field Laboratory, CNRS/MPI, Grenoble, France.
    Thelander, Lars
    Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysicis, Umeå University.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    EPR studies on a stable sulfinyl radical observed in the iron-oxygen reconstituted Y177F/I263C protein double mutant of ribonucleotide reductase from mouse2002In: Biochemistry, ISSN 0006-2960, E-ISSN 1520-4995, Vol. 41, no 20, 6510-6516 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the biosynthesis of deoxyribonucleotides. The active enzyme contains a diiron center and a tyrosyl free radical required for enzyme activity. The radical is located at Y177 in the R2 protein of mouse RNR. The radical is formed concomitantly with the μ-oxo-bridged diferric center in a reconstitution reaction between ferrous iron and molecular oxygen in the protein. EPR at 9.6 and 285 GHz was used to investigate the reconstitution reaction in the double-mutant Y177F/I263C of mouse protein R2. The aim was to produce a protein-linked radical derived from the Cys residue in the mutant protein to investigate its formation and characteristics. The mutation Y177F hinders normal radical formation at Y177, and the I263C mutation places a Cys residue at the same distance from the iron center as Y177 in the native protein. In the reconstitution reaction, we observed small amounts of a transient radical with a probable assignment to a peroxy radical, followed by a stable sulfinyl radical, most likely located on C263. The unusual radical stability may be explained by the hydrophobic surroundings of C263, which resemble the hydrophobic pocket surrounding Y177 in native protein R2. The observation of a sulfinyl radical in RNR strengthens the relationship between RNR and another free radical enzyme, pyruvate formate-lyase, where a similar relatively stable sulfinyl radical has been observed in a mutant. Sulfinyl radicals may possibly be considered as stabilized forms of very short-lived thiyl radicals, proposed to be important intermediates in the radical chemistry of RNR.

  • 18.
    Ahlford, Katrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Lind, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Adolfsson, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Organic Chemistry.
    Rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of alkyl and aryl ketones in aqueous media2008In: Green Chemistry, ISSN 1463-9262, E-ISSN 1463-9270, Vol. 10, no 8, 832-835 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel lipophilic rhodium catalyst was evaluated in the enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of ketones in water using sodium formate as the hydride donor, and in the presence of sodium docecylsulfonate. Alkyl alkyl ketones were reduced in good yields and in moderate to good enantioselectivities, and the reduction of aryl alkyl ketones proceeded with excellent enantioselectivity (up to 97% ee).

  • 19. Ahmad, Shabbir
    et al.
    Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki
    Palombo, Isolde
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Daley, Daniel O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Johnson, Kenneth A.
    Morgenstern, Ralf
    Haeggström, Jesper Z.
    Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes
    Trimeric microsomal glutathione transferase 2 displays one third of the sites reactivity2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Proteins and Proteomics, ISSN 1570-9639, E-ISSN 1878-1454, Vol. 1854, no 10, 1365-1371 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human microsomal glutathione transferase 2 (MGST2) is a trimeric integral membrane protein that belongs to the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) family. The mammalian MAPEG family consists of six members where four have been structurally determined. MGST2 activates glutathione to form a thiolate that is crucial for GSH peroxidase activity and GSH conjugation reactions with electrophilic substrates, such as 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Several studies have shown that MGST2 is able to catalyze a GSH conjugation reaction with the epoxide LTA(4) forming the pro-inflammatory LTC4. Unlike its closest homologue leukotriene C-4 synthase (LTC4S), MGST2 appears to activate its substrate GSH using only one of the three potential active sites [Ahmad S, et al. (2013) Biochemistry. 52, 1755-1764]. In order to demonstrate and detail the mechanism of one-third of the sites reactivity of MGST2, we have determined the enzyme oligomeric state, by Blue native PAGE and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, as well as the stoichiometty of substrate and substrate analog inhibitor binding to MGST2, using equilibrium dialysis and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, respectively. Global simulations were used to fit kinetic data to determine the catalytic mechanism of MGST2 with GSH and CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) as substrates. The best fit was observed with 1/3 of the sites catalysis as compared with a simulation where all three sites were active. In contrast to LTC4S, MGST2 displays a 1/3 the sites reactivity, a mechanism shared with the more distant family member MGST1 and recently suggested also for microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1.

  • 20. Ahn, Young O.
    et al.
    Lee, Hyun Ju
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kaluka, Daniel
    Yeh, Syun-Ru
    Rousseau, Denis L.
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gennis, Robert B.
    The two transmembrane helices of CcoP are sufficient for assembly of the cbb(3)-type heme-copper oxygen reductase from Vibrio cholerae2015In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1847, no 10, 1231-1239 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The C-family (cbb(3)) of heme-copper oxygen reductases are proton-pumping enzymes terminating the aerobic respiratory chains of many bacteria, including a number of human pathogens. The most common form of these enzymes contains one copy each of 4 subunits encoded by the ccoNOQP operon. In the cbb3 from Rhodobacter capsulatus, the enzyme is assembled in a stepwise manner, with an essential role played by an assembly protein CcoH. Importantly, it has been proposed that a transient interaction between the transmembrane domains of CcoP and CcoH is essential for assembly. Here, we test this proposal by showing that a genetically engineered form of cbb(3) from Vibrio cholerae (CcoNOQP(X)) that lacks the hydrophilic domain of CcoP, where the two heme c moieties are present, is fully assembled and stable. Single-turnover kinetics of the reaction between the fully reduced CcoNOQP(X) and O-2 are essentially the same as the wild type enzyme in oxidizing the 4 remaining redox-active sites. The enzyme retains approximately 10% of the steady state oxidase activity using the artificial electron donor TMPD, but has no activity using the physiological electron donor cytochrome c(4), since the docking site for this cytochrome is presumably located on the absent domain of CcoP. Residue E49 in the hydrophobic domain of CcoP is the entrance of the K-C-channel for proton input, and the E49A mutation in the truncated enzyme further reduces the steady state activity to less than 3%. Hence, the same proton channel is used by both the wild type and truncated enzymes.

  • 21. Ahn, Young O.
    et al.
    Mahinthichaichan, Paween
    Lee, Hyun Ju
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ouyang, Hanlin
    Kaluka, Daniel
    Yeh, Syun-Ru
    Arjona, Davinia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rousseau, Denis L.
    Tajkhorshid, Emad
    Ädelroth, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gennis, Robert B.
    Conformational coupling between the active site and residues within the K-C-channel of the Vibrio cholerae cbb(3)-type (C-family) oxygen reductase2014In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 111, no 42, E4419-E4428 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The respiratory chains of nearly all aerobic organisms are terminated by proton-pumping heme-copper oxygen reductases (HCOs). Previous studies have established that C-family HCOs contain a single channel for uptake from the bacterial cytoplasm of all chemical and pumped protons, and that the entrance of the K-C-channel is a conserved glutamate in subunit III. However, the majority of the K-C-channel is within subunit I, and the pathway from this conserved glutamate to subunit I is not evident. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were used to characterize a chain of water molecules leading from the cytoplasmic solution, passing the conserved glutamate in subunit III and extending into subunit I. Formation of the water chain, which controls the delivery of protons to the K-C-channel, was found to depend on the conformation of Y241(Vc), located in subunit I at the interface with subunit III. Mutations of Y241(Vc) (to A/F/H/S) in the Vibrio cholerae cbb(3) eliminate catalytic activity, but also cause perturbations that propagate over a 28-angstrom distance to the active site heme b(3). The data suggest a linkage between residues lining the KC-channel and the active site of the enzyme, possibly mediated by transmembrane helix alpha 7, which contains both Y241(Vc) and the active site crosslinked Y255(Vc), as well as two Cu-B histidine ligands. Other mutations of residues within or near helix alpha 7 also perturb the active site, indicating that this helix is involved in modulation of the active site of the enzyme.

  • 22. Ahrentorp, Fredrik
    et al.
    Blomgren, Jakob
    Jonasson, Christian
    Sarwe, Anna
    Sepehri, Sobhan
    Eriksson, Emil
    Kalaboukhov, Alexei
    Jesorka, Aldo
    Winkler, Dag
    Schneiderman, Justin F.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Albert, Jan
    Gómez de la Torre, Teresa Zardán
    Strømme, Maria
    Johansson, Christer
    Sensitive magnetic biodetection using magnetic multi-core nanoparticles and RCA coils2017In: Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials, ISSN 0304-8853, E-ISSN 1873-4766, Vol. 427, 14-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use functionalized iron oxide magnetic multi-core particles of 100 nm in size (hydrodynamic particle diameter) and AC susceptometry (ACS) methods to measure the binding reactions between the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and bio-analyte products produced from DNA segments using the rolling circle amplification (RCA) method. We use sensitive induction detection techniques in order to measure the ACS response. The DNA is amplified via RCA to generate RCA coils with a specific size that is dependent on the amplification time. After about 75 min of amplification we obtain an average RCA coil diameter of about 1 mu m. We determine a theoretical limit of detection (LOD) in the range of 11 attomole (corresponding to an analyte concentration of 55 fM for a sample volume of 200 mu L) from the ACS dynamic response after the MNPs have bound to the RCA coils and the measured ACS readout noise. We also discuss further possible improvements of the LOD.

  • 23. Akishiba, Misao
    et al.
    Takeuchi, Toshihide
    Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa
    Sakamoto, Kentarou
    Yu, Hao-Hsin
    Nakase, Ikuhiko
    Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka
    Madani, Fatemeh
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Futaki, Shiroh
    Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide2017In: Nature Chemistry, ISSN 1755-4330, E-ISSN 1755-4349, Vol. 9, no 8, 751-761 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  • 24.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Millar, A Harvey
    Whelan, James
    Sonnhammer, Erik L L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chromosomal clustering of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins in Arabidopsis.2006In: Trends Genet, ISSN 0168-9525, Vol. 22, no 11, 589-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25. Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Nystedt, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Vezzi, Francesco
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Sherwood, Ellen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Ye, Rosa
    Knudsen, Bjarne
    Simonsen, Martin
    Turner, Benjamin
    de Jong, Pieter
    Wu, Cheng-Cang
    Lundeberg, Joakim
    Efficient de novo assembly of large and complex genomes by massively parallel sequencing of Fosmid pools2014In: BMC Genomics, ISSN 1471-2164, Vol. 15, 439- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sampling genomes with Fosmid vectors and sequencing of pooled Fosmid libraries on the Illumina platform for massive parallel sequencing is a novel and promising approach to optimizing the trade-off between sequencing costs and assembly quality. Results: In order to sequence the genome of Norway spruce, which is of great size and complexity, we developed and applied a new technology based on the massive production, sequencing, and assembly of Fosmid pools (FP). The spruce chromosomes were sampled with similar to 40,000 bp Fosmid inserts to obtain around two-fold genome coverage, in parallel with traditional whole genome shotgun sequencing (WGS) of haploid and diploid genomes. Compared to the WGS results, the contiguity and quality of the FP assemblies were high, and they allowed us to fill WGS gaps resulting from repeats, low coverage, and allelic differences. The FP contig sets were further merged with WGS data using a novel software package GAM-NGS. Conclusions: By exploiting FP technology, the first published assembly of a conifer genome was sequenced entirely with massively parallel sequencing. Here we provide a comprehensive report on the different features of the approach and the optimization of the process. We have made public the input data (FASTQ format) for the set of pools used in this study: ftp://congenie.org/congenie/Nystedt_2013/Assembly/ProcessedData/FosmidPools/.(alternatively accessible via http://congenie.org/downloads).The software used for running the assembly process is available at http://research.scilifelab.se/andrej_alexeyenko/downloads/fpools/.

  • 26.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Schmitt, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Tjärnberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Guala, Dmitri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Frings, Oliver
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Comparative interactomics with Funcoup 2.02012In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 40, no D1, D821-D828 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FunCoup (http://FunCoup.sbc.su.se) is a database that maintains and visualizes global gene/protein networks of functional coupling that have been constructed by Bayesian integration of diverse high-throughput data. FunCoup achieves high coverage by orthology-based integration of data sources from different model organisms and from different platforms. We here present release 2.0 in which the data sources have been updated and the methodology has been refined. It contains a new data type Genetic Interaction, and three new species: chicken, dog and zebra fish. As FunCoup extensively transfers functional coupling information between species, the new input datasets have considerably improved both coverage and quality of the networks. The number of high-confidence network links has increased dramatically. For instance, the human network has more than eight times as many links above confidence 0.5 as the previous release. FunCoup provides facilities for analysing the conservation of subnetworks in multiple species. We here explain how to do comparative interactomics on the FunCoup website.

  • 27.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sonnhammer, Erik L L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Global networks of functional coupling in eukaryotes from comprehensive data integration2009In: Genome Research, ISSN 1088-9051, E-ISSN 1549-5469, Vol. 19, no 6, 1107-16 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No single experimental method can discover all connections in the interactome. A computational approach can help by integrating data from multiple, often unrelated, proteomics and genomics pipelines. Reconstructing global networks of functional coupling (FC) faces the challenges of scale and heterogeneity--how to efficiently integrate huge amounts of diverse data from multiple organisms, yet ensuring high accuracy. We developed FunCoup, an optimized Bayesian framework, to resolve these issues. Because interactomes comprise functional coupling of many types, FunCoup annotates network edges with confidence scores in support of different kinds of interactions: physical interaction, protein complex member, metabolic, or signaling link. This capability boosted overall accuracy. On the whole, the constructed framework was comprehensively tested to optimize the overall confidence and ensure seamless, automated incorporation of new data sets of heterogeneous types. Using over 50 data sets in seven organisms and extensively transferring information between orthologs, FunCoup predicted global networks in eight eukaryotes. For the Ciona intestinalis network, only orthologous information was used, and it recovered a significant number of experimental facts. FunCoup predictions were validated on independent cancer mutation data. We show how FunCoup can be used for discovering candidate members of the Parkinson and Alzheimer pathways. Cross-species pathway conservation analysis provided further support to these observations.

  • 28.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Tamas, Ivica
    Liu, Gang
    Sonnhammer, Erik L L
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Automatic clustering of orthologs and inparalogs shared by multiple proteomes.2006In: Bioinformatics, ISSN 1460-2059, Vol. 22, no 14, e9-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Alexeyenko, Andrey
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Wassenberg, Deena M.
    Lobenhofer, Edward K.
    Yen, Jerry
    Linney, Elwood
    Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Meyer, Joel N.
    Dynamic Zebrafish Interactome Reveals Transcriptional Mechanisms of Dioxin Toxicity2010In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 5, e10465- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In order to generate hypotheses regarding the mechanisms by which 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) causes toxicity, we analyzed global gene expression changes in developing zebrafish embryos exposed to this potent toxicant in the context of a dynamic gene network. For this purpose, we also computationally inferred a zebrafish (Danio rerio) interactome based on orthologs and interaction data from other eukaryotes. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using novel computational tools to analyze this interactome, we distinguished between dioxin-dependent and dioxin-independent interactions between proteins, and tracked the temporal propagation of dioxin-dependent transcriptional changes from a few genes that were altered initially, to large groups of biologically coherent genes at later times. The most notable processes altered at later developmental stages were calcium and iron metabolism, embryonic morphogenesis including neuronal and retinal development, a variety of mitochondria-related functions, and generalized stress response (not including induction of antioxidant genes). Within the interactome, many of these responses were connected to cytochrome P4501A (cyp1a) as well as other genes that were dioxin-regulated one day after exposure. This suggests that cyp1a may play a key role initiating the toxic dysregulation of those processes, rather than serving simply as a passive marker of dioxin exposure, as suggested by earlier research. Conclusions/Significance: Thus, a powerful microarray experiment coupled with a flexible interactome and multi-pronged interactome tools (which are now made publicly available for microarray analysis and related work) suggest the hypothesis that dioxin, best known in fish as a potent cardioteratogen, has many other targets. Many of these types of toxicity have been observed in mammalian species and are potentially caused by alterations to cyp1a.

  • 30.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The Mitochondrial Peptidasome, PreP, relation to Alzheimer Disease2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is the toxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer Disease (AD). Accumulation of Aβ has been shown in brain mitochondria from AD patients and AD mice models. The occurrence of Aβ in the mitochondrial matrix leads to free radical generation and apoptosis in neurons.

    In our studies, Aβ was found in brain mitochondria of living patients with plaque pathology. Extracellular Aβ was taken up by neuroblastoma cells and was found in the mitochondria. Moreover, we showed that Aβ40 and Aβ42 are transported into mitochondria via the Translocase of the Outer Membrane, the TOM machinery.

    We have identified the mitochondrial Aβ-degrading protease hPreP, in human brain mitochondrial matrix. PreP is a metalloprotease, originally identified as presequence protease, but was also shown to degrade other unstructured peptides including Aβ. Immunoinactivation of PreP in human brain mitochondria revealed PreP to be the protease responsible for Aβ degradation in mitochondria.

    Also, we have investigated if genetic variation in the gene encoding hPreP is associated with AD by genotyping 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Swedish population. The study did not show a genetic association between any of the genotyped SNPs and the risk to AD. However, the biochemical analysis of four SNPs selected on the basis of their location within a structural homology model of hPreP revealed a decreased activity compared to wildtype.

    Interestingly, the activity of PreP in human brain mitochondrial matrix in AD individuals was significantly lower compared to non-dement aged-matched controls. These findings were also confirmed in brain mitochondrial matrix of AD mouse models. These results suggest that a decreased PreP activity may contribute to Aβ aggregation and accumulation inside mitochondria leading to neuronal death in AD. In summary, our findings show that the degradation of Aβ by hPreP may be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  • 31.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ankarcrona, Maria
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mitochondria and Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-beta peptide uptake and degradation by the presequence protease, hPreP2009In: Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes, ISSN 0145-479X, E-ISSN 1573-6881, Vol. 41, no 5, 447-451 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several lines of evidence suggest mitochondrial dysfunction as a possible underlying mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Accumulation of the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta), a neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of AD, has been detected in brain mitochondria of AD patients and AD transgenic mouse models. In vitro evidence suggests that the Abeta causes mitochondrial dysfunction e.g. oxidative stress, mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased activity of cytochrome c oxidase and TCA cycle enzymes. Here we review the link between mitochondrial dysfunctions and AD. In particular we focus on the mechanism for Abeta uptake by mitochondria and on the recently identified Abeta degrading protease in human brain mitochondria.

  • 32.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berglund, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Engmann, Tanja
    Pavlov, Pavel
    Langer, Thomas
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Matrix localized AtPreP complements intermembrane space located homologue, MOP112, in Saccaromyces cerevisiaeManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berglund, Anna-Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Engmann, Tanja
    Spånning, Erika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Voegtle, F. -Nora
    Pavlov, Pavel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Meisinger, Chris
    Langer, Thomas
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Targeting Capacity and Conservation of PreP Homologues Localization in Mitochondria of Different Species2011In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 410, no 3, 400-410 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondrial presequences and other unstructured peptides are degraded inside mitochondria by presequence proteases (PrePs) identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPreP), humans (hPreP), and yeast (Cym1/Mop112). The presequences of A. thaliana and human PreP are predicted to consist of 85 and 29 amino acids, respectively, whereas the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cym1/Mop112 presequence contains only 7 residues. These differences may explain the reported targeting of homologous proteins to different mitochondrial subcompartments. Here we have investigated the targeting capacity of the PreP homologues' presequences. We have produced fusion constructs containing N-terminal portions of AtPreP(1-125), hPreP(1-69), and Cym1(1-40) coupled to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and studied their import into isolated plant, mammalian, and yeast mitochondria, followed by mitochondrial subfractionation. Whereas the AtPreP presequence has the capacity to target GFP into the mitochondrial matrix of all three species, the hPreP presequence only targets GFP to the matrix of mammalian and yeast mitochondria. The Cym1/Mop112 presequence has an overall much weaker targeting capacity and only ensures mitochondrial sorting in its host species yeast. Revisiting the submitochondrial localization of Cym1 revealed that endogenous Cym1/Mop112 is localized to the matrix space, as has been previously reported for the plant and human homologues. Moreover, complementation studies in yeast show that native AtPreP restores the growth phenotype of yeast cells lacking Cym1, demonstrating functional conservation.

  • 34.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Lan
    Pinho, Catarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yan, Shi Du
    Decreased proteolytic activity of the PreP peptidasome in Alzheimer disease brain mitochondria and transgenic modelsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Alikhani, Nyosha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Guo, Lan
    Yan, Shiqiang
    Du, Heng
    Pinho, Catarina Moreira
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chen, John Xi
    Glaser, Elzbieta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yan, Shirley ShiDu
    Decreased proteolytic activity of the mitochondrial amyloid-β degrading enzyme, PreP peptidasome, in Alzheimer's disease brain mitochondria2011In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 27, no 1, 75-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), the neurotoxic peptide implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been shown in brain mitochondria of AD patients and of AD transgenic mouse models. The presence of Aβ in mitochondria leads to free radical generation and neuronal stress. Recently, we identified the presequence protease, PreP, localized in the mitochondrial matrix in mammalian mitochondria as the novel mitochondrial Aβ-degrading enzyme. In the present study, we examined PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of the human brain's temporal lobe, an area of the brain highly susceptible to Aβ accumulation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We found significantly lower hPreP activity in AD brains compared with non-AD age-matched controls. By contrast, in the cerebellum, a brain region typically spared from Aβ accumulation, there was no significant difference in hPreP activity when comparing AD samples to non-AD controls. We also found significantly reduced PreP activity in the mitochondrial matrix of AD transgenic mouse brains (Tg mAβPP and Tg mAβPP/ABAD) when compared to non-transgenic aged-matched mice. Furthermore, mitochondrial fractions isolated from AD brains and Tg mAβPP mice had higher levels of 4-hydroxynonenal, an oxidative product, as compared with those from non-AD and nonTg mice. Accordingly, activity of cytochrome c oxidase was significantly reduced in the AD mitochondria. These findings suggest that decreased PreP proteolytic activity, possibly due to enhanced ROS production, contributes to Aβ accumulation in mitochondria leading to the mitochondrial toxicity and neuronal death that is exacerbated in AD. Clearance of mitochondrial Aβ by PreP may thus be of importance in the pathology of AD.

  • 36. Altenhoff, Adrian M.
    et al.
    Boeckmann, Brigitte
    Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador
    Dalquen, Daniel A.
    DeLuca, Todd
    Forslund, Kristoffer
    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime
    Linard, Benjamin
    Pereira, Cecile
    Pryszcz, Leszek P.
    Schreiber, Fabian
    da Silva, Alan Sousa
    Szklarczyk, Damian
    Train, Clement-Marie
    Bork, Peer
    Lecompte, Odile
    von Mering, Christian
    Xenarios, Ioannis
    Sjölander, Kimmen
    Juhl Jensen, Lars
    Martin, Maria J.
    Muffato, Matthieu
    Gabaldon, Toni
    Lewis, Suzanna E.
    Thomas, Paul D.
    Sonnhammer, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Dessimoz, Christophe
    Standardized benchmarking in the quest for orthologs2016In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 13, no 5, 425-+ p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving high accuracy in orthology inference is essential for many comparative, evolutionary and functional genomic analyses, yet the true evolutionary history of genes is generally unknown and orthologs are used for very different applications across phyla, requiring different precision-recall trade-offs. As a result, it is difficult to assess the performance of orthology inference methods. Here, we present a community effort to establish standards and an automated web-based service to facilitate orthology benchmarking. Using this service, we characterize 15 well-established inference methods and resources on a battery of 20 different benchmarks. Standardized benchmarking provides a way for users to identify the most effective methods for the problem at hand, sets a minimum requirement for new tools and resources, and guides the development of more accurate orthology inference methods.

  • 37.
    Amelina, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Proteomics in biomarker research: Insights into the effects of aging and environment on biological systems2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteomics is the global analysis of proteins that covers a broad range of technologies aimed at determining the identity and quantity of proteins expressed in the cell, their three-dimensional structure and interaction partners. In contrast to genome, proteome reflects more accurately on the dynamic state of the cell, tissue, or an organism. Therefore much is expected from proteomics to yield better disease markers for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring, as well as biomarkers that would indicate environmental exposure or provide prediction of biological age.

    In this thesis, I have developed and applied robust and sensitive subproteomic approaches to study the effect of aging as well as and environmental pollution using different animal models.

    In the first part, a high-throughput proteomic method based on liquid chromatography coupled to 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (LC/2-DE) was developed. The usefulness of this method has been demonstrated by applying it to the assessment of marine pollution in a field experiment.

    Next, I have utilized this subproteomic approach to study the effect of aging in mouse kidney of both genders. As a result, a protein expression signature of aging kidney was obtained, revealing gender-dependent alterations in proteome profiles of aging mouse kidney.

    In order to further reduce the dynamic range of protein expression and increase the sensitivity of proteomic analysis, I have applied a shotgun mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) coupled to liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to study age-related differences in peroxisome-enriched fractions from mouse liver. Only eight proteins showed statistically significant difference in expression (p<0.05) with moderate folds. This study indicates that age-depended changes in the liver proteome are minimal, suggesting that its proteome is efficiently maintained until certain age.

    Finally, in the context of aging studies and the role of peroxisomes in aging, I have tested the utility of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as agents for protein delivery into acatalasemic peroxisomes using yeast as a model. The results obtained suggest that CPPs may be suitable for the delivery of antioxidants to peroxisomes and in future could provide a tool for the protein therapy of age-related diseases.

  • 38.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Apraiz, Itxaso
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sun, Wei
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Proteomics-based method for the assessment of marine pollution using liquid chromatography coupled with two-dimensional electrophoresis2007In: Journal of Proteome Research, ISSN 1535-3893, E-ISSN 1535-3907, Vol. 6, no 6, 2094-2104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a proteomic approach, we have developed a new method for the assessment of marine pollution that generates highly reproducible protein expression patterns and it is simple and scalable. The protocol is based on applying liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) to analyze changes in the protein expression pattern after exposure to marine pollution. The digestive gland of the sentinel “blue mussel” (Mytilus edulis) was batch-processed through a simple cell fractionation followed by ion-exchange chromatography and 2-DE. The selection of ligands, elution method, and small volume design was carefully considered to define a protocol that could be mainly robotized. A pilot study with samples collected from different Gothenburg harbor areas indicated that the clean area could be distinguished from the polluted ones based on a protein expression pattern (PES) composed of 13 proteins. Principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering confirmed that the PES was sufficient to discriminate polluted and unpolluted areas and to provide a spatial gradient from the polluted source. Several proteins from the PES were identified by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI−MS/MS), and they are involved in β-oxidation, amino acid metabolism, detoxification, protein degradation, organelle biogenesis, and protein folding. In the near future, this methodology could show potential advantages to assess marine pollution and could become a stable platform to elucidate ecotoxicological questions.

  • 39.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Proteomic study on gender differences in aging kidney of mice2009In: Proteome Science, ISSN 1477-5956, Vol. 7, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study aims to analyze sex differences in mice aging kidney. We applied a proteomic technique based on subfractionation, and liquid chromatography coupled with 2-DE. Samples from male and female CD1-Swiss outbred mice from 28 weeks, 52 weeks, and 76 weeks were analysed by 2-DE, and selected proteins were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    RESULTS: This proteomic analysis detected age-related changes in protein expression in 55 protein-spots, corresponding to 22 spots in males and 33 spots in females. We found a protein expression signature (PES) of aging composed by 8 spots, common for both genders. The identified proteins indicated increases in oxidative and proteolytic proteins and decreases in glycolytic proteins, and antioxidant enzymes.

    CONCLUSION: Our results provide insights into the gender differences associated to the decline of kidney function in aging. Thus, we show that proteomics can provide valuable information on age-related changes in expression levels of proteins and related modifications. This pilot study is still far from providing candidates for aging-biomarkers. However, we suggest that the analysis of these proteins could suggest mechanisms of cellular aging in kidney, and improve the kidney selection for transplantation.

  • 40.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Holm, Tina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Langel, Ülo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Neurochemistry.
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Delivering catalase to yeast peroxisomes using cell-penetrating peptidesIn: The FEBS Journal, ISSN 1742-464X, E-ISSN 1742-4658Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjodin, Marcus O. D.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quantitative subproteomic analysis of age-related changes in mouse liver peroxisomes by iTRAQ LC-MS/MS2011In: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376X, Vol. 879, no 30, 3393-3400 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging is a complex multifactorial phenomenon, which is believed to result from the accumulation of cellular damage to biological macromolecules. Peroxisomes recently emerged as another important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in addition to mitochondria. However, the role of these organelles in the process of aging is still not clear. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in protein expression profiles of young (10 weeks old) versus old (18 months old) mouse liver peroxisome-enriched fractions. We have applied shotgun proteomic approach based on liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) combined with iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) labeling that allows comparative quantitative multiplex analysis. Our analysis led to identification and quantification of 150 proteins, 8 out of which were differentially expressed between two age groups at a statistically significant level (p < 0.05), with folds ranging from 1.2 to 4.1. These proteins involved in peroxisornal beta-oxidation, detoxification of xenobiotics and production of ROS. Noteworthy, differences in liver proteome have been observed between as well as within different age groups. In conclusion, our subproteomic quantitative study suggests that mouse liver proteome is sufficiently maintained until certain age.

  • 42.
    Amelina, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjödin, Marcus O. D.
    Bergquist, Jonas
    Cristobal, Susana
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Quantitative subproteomic analysis of age-related changes in mouse liver peroxisomes by iTRAQ LC-MS/MSIn: Journal of chromatography. B, ISSN 1570-0232, E-ISSN 1873-376XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Amico, Mauro
    et al.
    Finelli, Michele
    Rossi, Ivan
    Zauli, Andrea
    Elofsson, Arne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Viklund, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    von Heijne, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Jones, David
    Krogh, Anders
    Fariselli, Piero
    Luigi Martelli, Pier
    Casadio, Rita
    PONGO: a web server for multiple predictions of all-alpha transmembrane proteins.2006In: Nucleic Acids Res, ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 34, no Web Server issue, W169-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Andersson, August
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The Application of isotropic bicelles as model membranes2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Isotropic bicelles are disc-shaped aggregates of lipids and detergents, and are suitable model systems for high-resolution NMR studies of membrane-interacting peptides. In this thesis the structures for the two peptides motilin and transportan were determined by homonuclear 1H methods in the presence of bicelles, and the structure of the bovine prion protein peptide (bPrPp) was solved in the presence of DHPC micelles. All of these peptides were found to be largely a-helical when bound to the model membranes. In subsequent experiments both motilin and transportan were shown to reside on the surface of the bicelles, whereas bPrPp is more likely to have a transmembrane configuration.

    NMR translational diffusion experiments revealed that the isotropic bicelles studied here are very large objects compared to what is regularly indicated by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, these studies showed that all three peptides examined interact strongly with bicelles. Investigation of the NMR-relaxation of labeled sites in the peptides motilin and penetratin demonstrated that the overall rotational correlation times for these peptides do not reflect the bicellar size. Such decoupling of NMR relaxation from the dependence of overall size is also seen for the dynamics of the lipid molecules in the bicelles. It is therefore concluded that the overall size is not the sole determinant of the linewidths in NMR spectra, but that extensive motions within the bicelles also exert significant effects.

    Another interesting observation is that the membrane-bound structures of the peptides motilin, transportan, penetratin and bPrPp are very similar, even though these peptides have very different biological functions. In contrast, considerably more variation is observed in the membrane-positioning and molecular dynamics of these peptides. Since the bicelles have been found to induce differences in membrane positioning and molecular dynamics compared to micelles, these model membranes are likely to be important in order to enhance our understanding of the biological function of membrane interacting peptides.

  • 45.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Almqvist, J
    Hagn, F
    Mäler, L
    Diffusion and dynamics of penetratin in different membrane mimicking media2004In: Biochimica et biophysica acta Biomembranes, ISSN 0005-2736, Vol. 1661, no 1, 18-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46. Andersson, August
    et al.
    Biverståhl, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Linddahl, Emma
    Nordin, Jon
    Danielsson, Jens
    Mäler, Lena
    The membrane-induced structure of melittin is correlated with the fluidity of the lipids2007In: Biochimica et biophysica acta, ISSN 0006-3002, Vol. 1768, no 1, 115-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Biverståhl, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nordin, Jon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Lindahl, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    The membrane-induced structure of melittin is correlated with the fluidity of the lipids2007In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Vol. 1768, 115-121 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    A kinetic model for peptide-induced leakage from vesicles and cells2007Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Danielsson, Jens
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gräslund, Astrid
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kinetic models for peptide-induced leakage from vesicles and cells2007In: Eur. Biophys. J., Vol. 36, 621-635 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Andersson, August
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mäler, L
    Motilin-bicelle interactions: membrane position and translational diffusion2003In: FEBS letters, ISSN 0014-5793, Vol. 545, no 2-3, 139-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
1234567 1 - 50 of 1834
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf