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  • 1.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berger, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The evolution of alternative developmental pathways: footprints of selection on life-history traits in a butterfly2012In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 25, no 7, 1377-1388 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental pathways may evolve to optimize alternative phenotypes across environments. However, the maintenance of such adaptive plasticity under relaxed selection has received little study. We compare the expression of life-history traits across two developmental pathways in two populations of the butterfly Pararge aegeria where both populations express a diapause pathway but one never expresses direct development in nature. In the population with ongoing selection on both pathways, the difference between pathways in development time and growth rate was larger, whereas the difference in body size was smaller compared with the population experiencing relaxed selection on one pathway. This indicates that relaxed selection on the direct pathway has allowed life-history traits to drift towards values associated with lower fitness when following this pathway. Relaxed selection on direct development was also associated with a higher degree of genetic variation for protandry expressed as within-family sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Genetic correlations for larval growth rate across sexes and pathways were generally positive, with the notable exception of correlation estimates that involved directly developing males of the population that experienced relaxed selection on this pathway. We conclude that relaxed selection on one developmental pathway appears to have partly disrupted the developmental regulation of life-history trait expression. This in turn suggests that ongoing selection may be responsible for maintaining adaptive developmental regulation along alternative developmental pathways in these populations.

  • 2.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Diapause induction and relaxed selection on alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2015In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 84, no 2, 464-472 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life-history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 3.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Latitudinal phenological adaptation: diapause induction and differentiation between alternative developmental pathways in a butterflyManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Seasonal phenotypic plasticity entails differential trait expression depending on the time of season. The facultative induction of winter diapause in temperate insects is a developmental switch mechanism often leading to differential expression in life history traits. However, when there is a latitudinal shift from a bivoltine to univoltine life cycle, selection for pathway-specific expression is disrupted, which may allow drift towards less optimal trait values within the non-selected pathway.

    2. We use field- and experimental data from five Swedish populations of Pararge aegeria to investigate latitudinal variation in voltinism, local adaptation in the diapause switch, and footprints of selection on pathway-specific regulation of life history traits and sexual dimorphism in larval development.

    3. Field data clearly illustrated how natural populations gradually shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism as latitude increases. This was supported experimentally as the decrease in direct development at higher latitudes was accompanied by increasing critical daylengths, suggesting local adaptation in the diapause switch.

    4. The differential expression among developmental pathways in development time and growth rate was significantly less pronounced in univoltine populations. Univoltine populations showed no significant signs of protandry during larval development, suggesting that erosion of the direct development pathway under relaxed selection has led to the loss of its sex-specific modifications.

  • 4.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Gotthard, Karl
    The development and expression of seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits in the butterfly Pararge aegeriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Aalberg Haugen, Inger Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The diapause switch: Evolution of alternative developmental pathways in a butterfly2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Diapause decision is a classic example of a threshold switch mechanism with cascading effects on morphology, behaviour and life-history traits. This thesis addresses the downstream effects of the insect diapause switch, with the main focus on pathway-specific regulation of life-history traits, using the speckled wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria) as a study species. The ultimate pathway decision is made towards the end of larval development and allows the larvae to take into account up-to-date information from the environment about future conditions (Paper I, IV). However, already from an early point in development the larvae are sensitive to environmental cues and continuously adjust their growth trajectory in accordance to current information about the environmental conditions to be expected in future (Paper IV). An asymmetry in the ability to change from one developmental pathway to another at a late point in larval development suggests that the diapause and the direct pathway require different physiological preparations (Paper IV). Pathway-specific regulation of traits downstream of the diapause switch is maintained by ongoing selection. When the direct pathway is not regularly expressed, as with a shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism, relaxed selection on the unexpressed pathway leads to genetic drift and loss of protandry (Paper II, III). Natural populations display local adaptations in the diapause switch with an increase in critical daylengths as there is a gradual shift from bivoltinism to univoltinism (Paper III). This thesis highlights two aspects of the diapause decision, the determination of how and when this decision is made as well as the way the resulting pathways are moulded by selection in order to produce adaptive seasonal polyphenism in life-history traits.

  • 6.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Bologna.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Cultural evolution and individual development of openness and conservatism2009In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, Vol. 106, no 45, 18931-18935 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a model of cultural evolution in which an individual's propensity to engage in social learning is affected by social learning itself. We assume that individuals observe cultural traits displayed by others and decide whether to copy them based on their overall preference for the displayed traits. Preferences, too, can be transmitted between individuals. Our results show that such cultural dynamics tends to produce conservative individuals, i.e., individuals who are reluctant to copy new traits. Openness to new information, however, can be maintained when individuals need significant time to acquire the cultural traits that make them effective cultural models. We show that a gradual enculturation of young individuals by many models and a larger cultural repertoire to be acquired are favorable circumstances for the long-term maintenance of openness in individuals and groups. Our results agree with data about lifetime personality change, showing that openness to new information decreases with age. Our results show that cultural remodeling of cultural transmission is a powerful force in cultural evolution, i.e., that cultural evolution can change its own dynamics

  • 7.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. City University of New York, USA.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Old and Young Individuals' Role in Cultural Change2012In: JASSS: Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, ISSN 1460-7425, Vol. 15, no 4, 1- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the impact of age on cultural change through simulations of cultural evolution. Our simulations show that common observations about the relationship between old and young naturally emerge from repeated cultural learning. In particular, young individuals are more open to learn than older individuals, they are less effective as cultural models, and they possess less cultural traits. We also show that, being more open to learning, young individuals are an important source of cultural change. Cultural change, however, is faster in populations with both young and old. A relatively large share of older individuals, in fact, allows a population to retain more culture, and a large culture can change in more directions than a small culture. For the same reason, considering age-biased cultural transmission in an overlapping generations model, cultural evolution is slower when individuals interact preferentially with models of similar age than when they mainly interact with older models.

  • 8.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Brooklyn College, USA.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Regulatory traits: Cultural influences on cultural evolution2014In: Evolution, Complexity and Artificial Life / [ed] Stefano Cagnoni, Marco Mirolli, Marco Villani, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014, 135-147 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the term regulatory traits to indicate traits that both regulate cultural transmission (e.g., from whom to learn) and are themselves culturally transmitted. In the first part of this contribution we study the dynamics of some of these traits through simple mathematical models. In particular, we consider the cultural evolution of traits that determine the propensity to copy others, the ability to influence others, the number of individuals from whom one may copy, and the number of individuals one tries to influence. We then show how to extend these simple models to address more complex human cultural phenomena, such as ingroup biases, the emergence of open or conservative societies, and of cyclical, fashion-like, increases and decreases of popularity of cultural traits. We finally discuss how the ubiquity of regulatory traits in cultural evolution impacts on the analogy between genetic and cultural evolution and therefore on the possibility of using models inspired by evolutionary biology to study human cultural dynamics.

  • 9.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Honors Academy and Department of Psychology, Brooklyn College, New York, US.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Regulatory Traits in Cultural Evolution2012In: Proceedings of WiVACE 2012, Università degli Studi di Parma , 2012, 1-9 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We call \regulatory traits" those cultural traits that aretransmitted through cultural interactions and, at the same time, changeindividual behaviors directly inuencing the outcome of future culturalinteractions. The cultural dynamics of some of those traits are studiedthrough simple simulations. In particular, we consider the cultural evolu-tion of traits determining the propensity to copy, the number of potentialdemonstrators from whom one individual may copy, and conformist ver-sus anti{conformist attitudes. Our results show that regulatory traitsgenerate peculiar dynamics that may explain complex human culturalphenomena. We discuss how the existence and importance of regulatorytraits in cultural evolution impact on the analogy between genetic andcultural evolution and therefore on the possibility of using evolutionarybiology{inspired models to study human cultural dynamics.

  • 10.
    Acerbi, Alberto
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Ghirlanda, Stefano
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Enquist, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The logic of fashion cycles2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 3, e32541- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cultural traits exhibit volatile dynamics, commonly dubbed fashions or fads. Here we show that realistic fashion-like dynamics emerge spontaneously if individuals can copy others' preferences for cultural traits as well as traits themselves. We demonstrate this dynamics in simple mathematical models of the diffusion, and subsequent abandonment, of a single cultural trait which individuals may or may not prefer. We then simulate the coevolution between many cultural traits and the associated preferences, reproducing power-law frequency distributions of cultural traits (most traits are adopted by few individuals for a short time, and very few by many for a long time), as well as correlations between the rate of increase and the rate of decrease of traits (traits that increase rapidly in popularity are also abandoned quickly and vice versa). We also establish that alternative theories, that fashions result from individuals signaling their social status, or from individuals randomly copying each other, do not satisfactorily reproduce these empirical observations.

  • 11.
    Ackefors, H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi.
    Dramatisk ökning av odlade räkor, oro över räkfisket miljökonsekvenser.2007In: Vår Föda, Vol. 3, 32-35 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Dramatisk ökning av odlade räkor - Oro över räkfiskets miljökonsekvenser2007In: Vår Föda, Vol. 3, 32-35 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Global fisheries - threats and opportunities2009In: Fisheries, sustainablity and development: fifty-two authors on coexistence and development of fisheries and aquaculture in developing and developed countries / [ed] Per Wramner, Hans Ackefors et al, Stockholm: Kungl. Skogs- och lantbruksakademien , 2009, 35-68- p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Sveriges havs- och kustfiske.2007In: Människan och faunan, 2007: Etnobiologi i Sverige 3, 2007, 424-430 p.Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    The evolution of a worldwide shrimp industry2009In: World Aquaculture, ISSN 1041-5602, Vol. 40, no 3, 46-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Ackefors, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Är det politikerna eller fiskenäringen som styr fisket?2008In: Kungl. Skogs- och Lantbruksakademiens Tidskrift, ISSN 0023-5350, Vol. 147, no 2, 36-43 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Agosta, Salvatore J
    et al.
    University of Toronto.
    Janz, Niklas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Brooks, Daniel R
    University of Toronto.
    How specialists can be generalists: resolving the “parasite paradox” and implications for emerging infectious disease2010In: Zoologia, ISSN 1984-4670, Vol. 27, no 2, 151-162 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The parasite paradox arises from the dual observations that parasites (broadly construed, including phy- tophagous insects) are resource specialists with restricted host ranges, and yet shifts onto relatively unrelated hosts are common in the phylogenetic diversification of parasite lineages and directly observable in ecological time. We synthe- size the emerging solution to this paradox: phenotypic flexibility and phylogenetic conservatism in traits related to resource use, grouped under the term ecological fitting, provide substantial opportunities for rapid host switching in changing environments, in the absence of the evolution of novel host-utilization capabilities. We discuss mechanisms behind ecological fitting, its implications for defining specialists and generalists, and briefly review empirical examples of host shifts in the context of ecological fitting. We conclude that host shifts via ecological fitting provide the fuel for the expansion phase of the recently proposed oscillation hypothesis of host range and speciation, and, more generally, the generation of novel combinations of interacting species within the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution. Finally, we conclude that taxon pulses, driven by climate change and large-scale ecological perturbation are drivers of biotic mixing and resultant ecological fitting, which leads to increased rates of rapid host switching, including the agents of Emerging Infectious Disease.

  • 18. Aguirre, A. A.
    et al.
    Angerbjörn, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Animal Ecology.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, T.
    Health evaluation of arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in Sweden2000In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 31, no 1, 36-40 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hematologic. serum biochemistry, and serum cortisol reference ranges were established and tonsil/rectal bacterial and fecal parasite examinations were performed on 21 wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs during July 1996. Several of the hematologic and serum biochemistry values fell within normal ranges for other wild canids or domestic dogs of the same age class. Serum alanine transaminase and creatine phosphokinase values were significantly higher in the youngest cubs. Proteus vulgaris and Escherichia coli were isolated from both tonsilar and rectal swabs of several cubs in all dens. The most common gastrointestinal parasite ova were Toxascaris leonina (59%), Isospora spp. (52%), Uncinaria stenocephala (33%), and Capillaria spp. (26%). Prevalence of T. leonina differed significantly between dens and between age groups. Hematologic and serum biochemistry values and degree of parasitism may be indicators of health, stress, and nutritional status of arctic foxes.

  • 19. Aguirre, A. Alonso
    et al.
    Principe, B.
    Tannerfeldt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Mörner, Torsten
    Field anesthesia of wild arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs in the Swedish lapland using medetomidine-ketamine-atipamezole2000In: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine, Vol. 31, no 2, 244-246 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A safe and effective anesthetic regime for use in arctic fox (Alopex lagopus) cubs was developed. During July 1996, six free-ranging 6-8-wk-old cubs were captured near their den in Vindelfjallen Nature Reserve, Sweden. Medetomidine and ketamine HCl, followed by atipamezole, were selected for the anesthetic trial because of the well-documented safety and efficacy of this drug combination in a broad range of species. The dosage regimen used was 50 mu g/kg medetomidine combined with 2.5 mg/kg ketamine followed by reversal with 250 mu g/kg atipamezole. induction was rapid, with a mean induction time of 1 min and 32 sec (range: 58-150 sec). The cubs were anesthetized for a mean time of 18 +/- 5 min (range: 13-25 min). Serially recorded heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, and pulse oximetry were stable throughout the anesthetic period for all cubs. Anesthetic depth was suitable for safe handling and minor clinical procedures, including venipuncture. Following atipamezole, all cubs were standing within 12 +/- 7 min (range: 5-24 min) and fully recovered at 27 +/- 5 min (range: 19-36 min). This information will be useful for future captive breeding and management programs involving the endangered arctic fox.

  • 20. Ah-King, M
    et al.
    Elofsson, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kvarnemo, C
    Rosenquist, G
    Berglund, A
    Why no sperm competition in pipefish with externally brooding males?Manuscript (Other academic)
  • 21. Ah-King, Malin
    et al.
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Sex in an Evolutionary Perspective: Just Another Reaction Norm2010In: Evolutionary biology, ISSN 0071-3260, E-ISSN 1934-2845, Vol. 37, no 4, 234-246 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is common to refer to all sorts of clear-cut differences between the sexes as something that is biologically almost inevitable. Although this does not reflect the status of evolutionary theory on sex determination and sexual dimorphism, it is probably a common view among evolutionary biologists as well, because of the impact of sexual selection theory. To get away from thinking about biological sex and traits associated with a particular sex as something static, it should be recognized that in an evolutionary perspective sex can be viewed as a reaction norm, with sex attributes being phenotypically plastic. Sex determination itself is fundamentally plastic, even when it is termed "genetic". The phenotypic expression of traits that are statistically associated with a particular sex always has a plastic component. This plasticity allows for much more variation in the expression of traits according to sex and more overlap between the sexes than is typically acknowledged. Here we review the variation and frequency of evolutionary changes in sex, sex determination and sex roles and conclude that sex in an evolutionary time-frame is extremely variable. We draw on recent findings in sex determination mechanisms, empirical findings of morphology and behaviour as well as genetic and developmental models to explore the concept of sex as a reaction norm. From this point of view, sexual differences are not expected to generally fall into neat, discrete, pre-determined classes. It is important to acknowledge this variability in order to increase objectivity in evolutionary research.

  • 22.
    Ahlgren, Hans
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Norén, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Angerbjörn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Multiple prehistoric introductions of the mountain hare (Lepus timidus) on a remote island, as revealed by ancient DNA2016In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 43, no 9, 1786-1796 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The majority of the non-volant mammals now present on the island of Gotland, Sweden, have been introduced in modern times. One exception is the mountain hare (Lepus timidus), which was present on the island more than 9000 years ago. This paper investigates the origins of the Gotland hares and temporal changes in their genetic structure, and considers how they may have reached the island.

    Location: The island of Gotland, Sweden (57°30′ N, 18°20′ E).

    Methods: Two fragments of the mitochondrial D-loop 130 + 164 base pairs in length from skeletal remains from 40 ancient mountain hares from Gotland, 38 from the Swedish mainland and five from Lithuania were analysed and compared with 90 modern L. timidus haplotypes from different locations in Eurasia and five haplotypes of the Don-hare (Lepus tanaiticus) morphotype.

    Results: The Mesolithic hares from Gotland (7304 bc–5989 bc) cluster with modern hares from Russia, Scotland, the Alps and Fennoscandia whereas the Gotland hares from the Neolithic and onwards (2848 bc–1641 ad) cluster with Neolithic hares from the Swedish mainland and modern hares from Fennoscandia. The Neolithic haplotypes from Lithuania and the Don-hare haplotypes were dispersed within the network. The level of differentiation (FST) between the Mesolithic and Neolithic hares on Gotland was twice as great as that observed on the mainland.

    Main conclusions: The ancient hares on Gotland fall into two haplogroups separated in time, indicating that the mountain hare became extinct at one point, with subsequent re-colonization events. In view of the isolated location of Gotland, it is probable that the hares were brought there by human means of transport.

  • 23. Ahola, Virpi
    et al.
    Lehtonen, Rainer
    Somervuo, Panu
    Salmela, Leena
    Koskinen, Patrik
    Rastas, Pasi
    Valimaki, Niko
    Paulin, Lars
    Kvist, Jouni
    Wahlberg, Niklas
    Tanskanen, Jaakko
    Hornett, Emily A.
    Ferguson, Laura C.
    Luo, Shiqi
    Cao, Zijuan
    de Jong, Maaike A.
    Duplouy, Anne
    Smolander, Olli-Pekka
    Vogel, Heiko
    McCoy, Rajiv C.
    Qian, Kui
    Chong, Wong Swee
    Zhang, Qin
    Ahmad, Freed
    Haukka, Jani K.
    Joshi, Aruj
    Salojarvi, Jarkko
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Grosse-Wilde, Ewald
    Hughes, Daniel
    Katainen, Riku
    Pitkanen, Esa
    Ylinen, Johannes
    Waterhouse, Robert M.
    Turunen, Mikko
    Vaharautio, Anna
    Ojanen, Sami P.
    Schulman, Alan H.
    Taipale, Minna
    Lawson, Daniel
    Ukkonen, Esko
    Makinen, Veli
    Goldsmith, Marian R.
    Holm, Liisa
    Auvinen, Petri
    Frilander, Mikko J.
    Hanski, Ilkka
    The Glanville fritillary genome retains an ancient karyotype and reveals selective chromosomal fusions in Lepidoptera2014In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, 4737- p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have reported that chromosome synteny in Lepidoptera has been well conserved, yet the number of haploid chromosomes varies widely from 5 to 223. Here we report the genome (393 Mb) of the Glanville fritillary butterfly (Melitaea cinxia; Nymphalidae), a widely recognized model species in metapopulation biology and eco-evolutionary research, which has the putative ancestral karyotype of n = 31. Using a phylogenetic analyses of Nymphalidae and of other Lepidoptera, combined with orthologue-level comparisons of chromosomes, we conclude that the ancestral lepidopteran karyotype has been n = 31 for at least 140 My. We show that fusion chromosomes have retained the ancestral chromosome segments and very few rearrangements have occurred across the fusion sites. The same, shortest ancestral chromosomes have independently participated in fusion events in species with smaller karyotypes. The short chromosomes have higher rearrangement rate than long ones. These characteristics highlight distinctive features of the evolutionary dynamics of butterflies and moths.

  • 24. Allendorf, Fred
    et al.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The role of genetics in population viability analysis2002In: Population Viability Analysis / [ed] Beissinger,S.R. and McCullough,D.R., Chicago: University of Chicago Press , 2002, 50-85 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Allendorf, Fred W.
    et al.
    Berry, Oliver
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    So long to genetic diversity, and thanks for all the fish2014In: Molecular Ecology, ISSN 0962-1083, E-ISSN 1365-294X, Vol. 23, no 1, 23-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The world faces a global fishing crisis. Wild marine fisheries comprise nearly 15% of all animal protein in the human diet, but, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, nearly 60% of all commercially important marine fish stocks are overexploited, recovering, or depleted (FAO 2012; Fig. 1). Some authors have suggested that the large population sizes of harvested marine fish make even collapsed populations resistant to the loss of genetic variation by genetic drift (e. g. Beverton 1990). In contrast, others have argued that the loss of alleles because of overfishing may actually be more dramatic in large populations than in small ones (Ryman et al. 1995). In this issue, Pinsky & Palumbi (2014) report that overfished populations have approximately 2% lower heterozygosity and 12% lower allelic richness than populations that are not overfished. They also performed simulations which suggest that their estimates likely underestimate the actual loss of rare alleles by a factor of three or four. This important paper shows that the harvesting of marine fish can have genetic effects that threaten the long-term sustainability of this valuable resource.

  • 26. Allendorf, Fred W
    et al.
    England, Phillip R
    Luikart, Gordon
    Ritchie, Peter A
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Genetic effects of harvest on wild animal populations.2008In: Trends Ecol Evol, ISSN 0169-5347, Vol. 23, no 6, 327-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human harvest of animals in the wild occurs in terrestrial and aquatic habitats throughout the world and is often intense. Harvest has the potential to cause three types of genetic change: alteration of population subdivision, loss of genetic variation, and selective genetic changes. To sustain the productivity of harvested populations, it is crucial to incorporate genetic considerations into management. Nevertheless, it is not necessary to disentangle genetic and environmental causes of phenotypic changes to develop management plans for individual species. We recommend recognizing that some genetic change due to harvest is inevitable. Management plans should be developed by applying basic genetic principles combined with molecular genetic monitoring to minimize harmful genetic change.

  • 27.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Etologi.
    Development of feeding selectivity and behavioural syndromes in fallow deer2007In: Book of abstracts of the International Union of Game Biologists XXVIII Congress., 2007, 106- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Etologi.
    Development of feeding selectivity in fallow deer: evolutionary and ethological implications2007In: Proceedings of the 19th Nordic Symposium of the International Society for Applied Ethology, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Food choice in fallow deer – experimental studies of selectivity2007Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I experimentally investigate feeding selectivity in fallow deer (Dama dama), with respect to plant secondary compounds, especially tannins, which can decrease the quality of foods. I found that fallow deer avoided foods with higher amounts of tannic acid and Quebracho tannin, even though the deer ate some high-tannin food. The food choice was strongly dependent on the context in which the food was presented, so that the food choice in relation to tannin content was relative rather than absolute. When high-tannin food occurred at low frequency, the deer ate proportionally less from this type of food, at least when the difference in tannin content between the two foods was large. A basic implication is that an unpalatable plant type could benefit from its unpalatability, especially when occurring at low frequency. In experiments with two patches, the finding of a stronger within- than between-patch selectivity was mirrored in associational effects. First, low-tannin, palatable food was more eaten when occurring in a high-tannin patch, which corresponds to neighbour contrast susceptibility. Second, high-tannin, unpalatable food in a less defended patch was less eaten, which corresponds to neighbour contrast defence. A proximate cause of the associational effects can be the presence of a simultaneous negative contrast, which was experimentally demonstrated in an additional study. Individual differences in selectivity were present early in life and were consistent over five years, and selectivity was correlated with foraging exploratory behaviour. The results from this thesis suggest that fallow deer are selective in their food choice with respect to tannins from the beginning, and that the frequency of occurrence of different foods, but also the distance between foods and the complexity of presentation, influence the food choice. It is also suggested that a foraging behavioural syndrome is present in mammalian herbivores.

  • 30.
    Alm Bergvall, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Svensson, Lisa
    Kjellander, Petter
    Vigilance adjustments in relation to long- and short term risk in wild fallow deer (Dama dama)2016In: Behavioural Processes, ISSN 0376-6357, Vol. 128, 58-63 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The risk allocation hypothesis predicts that vigilance should be adjusted to the temporal variation in risk. We test this hypothesis in wild fallow deer exposed to short term (disturbance) and long term (presence of a fawn after parturition) changes in risk. We recorded the proportion, frequency and type of vigilance and size of used area before and after parturition, in GPS-collared wild female fallow deer. Vigilance was divided in two main groups: non-grazing vigilance and grazing vigilance. The latter group was divided into grazing vigilance while chewing and a grazing vigilance when chewing was interrupted. By recording external disturbance in form of passing cars, we were able to investigate if this altered the amount, and type of vigilance. We found that females increased the proportion and frequency of grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition. The grazing vigilance chewing was unaffected, but non-grazing vigilance decreased. Disturbance increased the proportion grazing vigilance stop chewing to the same extent before and after parturition. We found a clear decrease in female home range size after parturition as a possible behavioural adjustment. The increase in grazing vigilance stop chewing after parturition is a rarely described but expected cost of reproduction.

  • 31.
    Alm, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Birgersson, Björn
    Leimar, Olof
    The effect of food quality and relative abundance on food choice in fallow deer2002In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, Vol. 64, no 3, 439-445 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Alm, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Etologi.
    Leimar, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Etologi.
    The effect of food quality and relative abundance on food choice in fallow deer2002In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 64, 439-445 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Almbro, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Escape flight in butterflies2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight is considered to be the overarching reason for the enormous diversity and world-wide abundance of insects. Not only does flight enable great distances to be covered and new areas to be colonised, flying has also evolved to be important in most adult life-history characteristics from reproduction to anti-predator strategies. However, despite its advantages, the costs of flight are high, particularly with regard to building a flight apparatus and staying in the air. Winged insects are popular prey for various predators from which they rely on flight to escape. However, because of their nutrient poor adult diet, butterflies are especially sensitive to the trade-off between flight and reproduction. Theory therefore predicts costs of physiological changes such as weight gain to be visible through altered aerial performance. Whereas insect flight has been extensively studied with regard to biomechanics, aerodynamics, dispersal and force production, little effort has been made to empirically study the relationship between escape strategies and weight loading, despite its value for survival and fitness. In this thesis a novel three-dimensional flight-recording set-up was used to study free flight ability in relation to natural weight loads in male and female Aglais urticae and Pieris napi butterflies. Weight loads consisted of ingested food, mate-carrying and reproductive mass, affecting wing loading and flight muscle ratio, key determinants of flight ability. Moreover, butterfly escape strategies were investigated through the use of model predators. The results showed that perceived predation risk affected butterfly flight behaviour, with greater speed being observed in attacked butterflies. Decreased flight muscle ratio after feeding resulted in slower escape flights in A. urticae, and impaired flight during mate-carrying in P. napi. Increased wing loading during reproduction in P. napi negatively affected male flight speed and female take-off angles. In summary, this thesis demonstrates that flight effort is context dependant and shows a trade-off between flight ability and longevity- and fitness related weight gain that may ultimately affect survival, mating success and energy expenditure.

  • 34.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Impaired escape flight ability in butterflies due to low flight muscle ratio prior to hibernation2008In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, Vol. 211, no 1, 24-28 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Centre for Evolutionary Biology, University of Western Australia.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Ethology.
    Season, sex and flight muscle investment affect take-off performance in the hibernating small tortoiseshell butterfly Agalis urticae (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)2011In: The Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera, ISSN 0022-4324, Vol. 44, 77-84 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flight ability is generally expected to increase with relative flight muscle mass. Changes in weight can therefore be expected to influence the capacity to rapidly take-off, which can determine mating success and predator avoidance. This study examined the influence of relative flight muscle mass, sex, and season on free take-off flight ability in a butterfly model (Aglais urticae) that undergoes adult winter hibernation. Mass change and take-off flight ability (velocity and take-off angle), was predicted to fluctuate with season (before, during and after hibernation) and sex (due to reproductive investment). Our results indeed showed changes in take-off ability in relation to both parameters. Females maintained velocity across seasons but reduced take-off angles during and after hibernation. Male flight speed increased during and after hibernation, whereas take-off angles were significantly reduced during hibernation. Finally, we showed that investment in relative flight muscle mass increased velocity in female, but not in male butterflies.

  • 36.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Department of Ethology. Stockholm University.
    The downfall of mating: the effect of mate-carrying and flight muscle ratio on the escape ability of a pierid butterfly2009In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, Vol. 63, no 3, 413-420 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Almbro, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Kullberg, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Weight Loading and Reproductive Status Affect the Flight Performance of Pieris napi Butterflies2012In: Journal of insect behavior, ISSN 0892-7553, E-ISSN 1572-8889, Vol. 25, no 5, 441-452 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weight-induced mobility reductions can have dramatic fitness consequences and winged animals are especially sensitive to the trade-off between mass and locomotion. Data on how natural weight fluctuations influence a flying insect's ability to take off are scarce. We therefore quantified take-off flight ability in Pieris napi butterflies in relation to reproductive status. Take-off flight ability (velocity and take-off angle) under suboptimal temperature conditions was recorded with a 3D-tracking camera system and was predicted to decrease with relatively larger weight loads. Our results show that relatively larger weight loads generally reduce flight speed in male butterflies and lower take-off angles in females. However, despite having a lower wing loading, mated male butterflies flew slower than unmated males. Our study suggests that retention of weight loads associated with reproduction impairs insect flight performance.

  • 38.
    Altizer, Sonia
    et al.
    Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia.
    Nunn, Charles L
    Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley.
    Lindenfors, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Do threatened hosts have fewer parasites?: A comparative study in primates2007In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, Vol. 76, 304-314 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Parasites and infectious diseases have become a major concern in conservation biology, in part because they can trigger or accelerate species or population declines. Focusing on primates as a well-studied host clade, we tested whether the species richness and prevalence of parasites differed between threatened and non-threatened host species.

    2. We collated data on 386 species of parasites (including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, helminths and arthropods) reported to infect wild populations of 36 threatened and 81 non-threatened primate species. Analyses controlled for uneven sampling effort and host phylogeny.

    3. Results showed that total parasite species richness was lower among threatened primates, supporting the prediction that small, isolated host populations harbour fewer parasite species. This trend was consistent across three major parasite groups found in primates (helminths, protozoa and viruses). Counter to our predictions, patterns of parasite species richness were independent of parasite transmission mode and the degree of host specificity.

    4. We also examined the prevalence of selected parasite genera among primate sister-taxa that differed in their ranked threat categories, but found no significant differences in prevalence between threatened and non-threatened hosts.

    5. This study is the first to demonstrate differences in parasite richness relative to host threat status. Results indicate that human activities and host characteristics that increase the extinction risk of wild animal species may lead simultaneously to the loss of parasites. Lower average parasite richness in threatened host taxa also points to the need for a better understanding of the cascading effects of host biodiversity loss for affiliated parasite species.

  • 39. Altstein, Miriam
    et al.
    Nässel, Dick R
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology, Functional Morphology.
    Neuropeptide signaling in insects.2010In: Neuropeptide systems as targets for parasite and pest control / [ed] Timothy G. Geary and Aaron G. Maule, New York: Springer Science+Business Media , 2010, Vol. 692, 155-65 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuropeptides represent the largest single class of signal compounds and are involved in regulation of development, growth, reproduction, metabolism and behavior of insects. Over the last few years there has been a tremendous increase in our knowledge of neuropeptide signaling due to genome sequencing, peptidomics, gene micro arrays, receptor characterization and targeted gene interference combined with physiological and behavior analysis. In this chapter we review the current knowledge of structure and distribution of insect neuropeptides and their receptors, as well as their diverse functions. We also discuss peptide biosynthesis, processing and expression, as well as classification of insect neuropeptides. Special attention is paid to the role insect neuropeptides play as potential targets for pest management and as a basis for development of insect control agents employing the rational/structural design approaches.

  • 40.
    Amcoff, Mirjam
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kolm, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Multiple male sexual signals and female responsiveness in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei2015In: Environmental Biology of Fishes, ISSN 0378-1909, E-ISSN 1573-5133, Vol. 98, no 7, 1731-1740 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the courtship process, multiple signals are often used between the signaller and the receiver. Here we describe female response to multiple male visual morphological and behavioural signals in the swordtail characin, Corynopoma riisei. The swordtail characin is a species in which males display several morphological ornaments as well as a rich courtship repertoire. Our results show that high courtship intensity was associated with an increased female response towards the male ornament, increased number of mating attempts and a reduction in female aggression. The morphological aspects investigated here did not seem to correlate with female response. This may indicate that, when both behaviour and morphology are considered simultaneously, courtship behaviour may have priority over morphological cues in this species.

  • 41.
    Amir, Omar A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Biology, ecology and anthropogenic threats of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in east Africa2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the biology, ecology and anthropogenic threats of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) off Zanzibar, Tanzania, based on research conducted and samples collected between 2000 and 2008. Distribution and occurrence are described based on incidental catches (bycatch) in gillnet fisheries. Biology and ecology are examined by ageing and studying the reproductive biology and stomach contents of collected specimens. The composition of organohalogen compounds is determined in blubber samples, and assessment and mitigation of bycatch are conducted using observers onboard fishing vessels. Fisheries bycatch data showed that Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins occur year round in all areas around Zanzibar. Sexual maturity was attained between 7 and 8 years and body length 190-200 cm in females and at 16 years and body length 213 cm in males. The gestation period was estimated to be 12.3 months, with calving occurring throughout the year, peaking November-March and with an interval of 2.7 years. The estimated pregnancy rate was between 0.10 and 0.58 depending on methods used. Stomach contents revealed a relatively large number of prey species, but that only a few small- and medium-sized neritic fish and cephalopods contribute substantially to the diet. Estimates of total annual bycatch were >9% which is not considered sustainable. An experiment showed that pingers can be a short term mitigation measure to reduce bycatch of dolphins in both drift- and bottom set gillnets. Methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (Meo-BDEs) were found at higher concentrations than anthropogenic organic pesticides (OCPs), with only traces of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) detected. This study reveals the magnitude and apparent susceptibility of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins off Zanzibar to anthropogenic threats, especially fisheries bycatch, and it is clear that immediate conservation and management measures are needed to reduce bycatch.

  • 42.
    Amir, Omar A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berggren, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Estimates of bycatch and field experiment using pingers to reduce bycatch of dolphins in drift- and bottom set gillnets in Menai Bay, Zanzibar, TanzaniaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to estimate the total bycatch in gillnet fisheries and to assess the impact on dolphin populations in the Menai Bay Conservation Area, a survey using independent observers aboard the fishing vessels was conducted in 2003/2004. The observer programme covered 23.6% and 24.5% of the drift- and bottom set gillnets effort, respectively. The estimated total bycatch was 13 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in drift gillnets and 4 humpback dolphins in bottom set gillnets representing 9.6% and 6.3%, respectively of the estimated 136 Indo-Pacific bottlenose and 63 humpback dolphins resident in the area in 2002. These bycatch levels were not considered sustainable. In 2007/2008 a second observer programme was conducted in the same area to investigate the effectiveness of acoustic alarms (pingers) in reducing the bycatch of dolphins in the drift- and bottom set gillnets. The observed effort in the drift gillnets was 257 sets without pingers and 251 sets with pingers representing 21% and 20% of the total recorded effort, respectively. Six dolphins were bycaught during the pinger experiment in the drift gillnets (1 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin in sets with pingers and 4 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins and 1 spinner dolphin in the sets without pingers). In the bottom set gillnet fishery, the observed fishing effort was 236 sets without pingers and 224 sets with pingers, representing 28% and 27% of the total recorded effort, respectively. In the bottom set gillnets, one humpback dolphin was bycaught in the sets without pingers and no dolphin was bycaught in the sets with pingers. Pingers reduced the bycatch of dolphins in both drift- and bottom set gillnets, however the reduction was only significant in the drift gillnets. Estimates of the total bycatch in the sets without pingers in 2007/2008 fishing season were 16 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in drift gillnets and 3 humpback dolphins in the bottom set gillnet fishery, representing 11.8% and 4.8% of estimated population size for respective species in the area in 2002. Given the documented unsustainable removal levels in the drift- and bottom set gillnets, immediate management actions are needed to reduce dolphin bycatch in these fisheries.

  • 43.
    Amir, Omar A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berggren, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Growth and reproduction of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) incidentally caught in gillnets off Zanzibar, TanzaniaArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Life history parameters of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) were examined in 69 specimens incidentally caught in gillnet fisheries off Zanzibar, Tanzania between 2000 and 2008. Calves were born at a body length of 103 cm and a weight of 12-15 kg. Sexual maturity in females was reached at 7-8 years and body length 190-200 cm. Sexual maturity in males was attained at 16 years and a body length of 213 cm. Calving occurred throughout the year with a peak November-March, after a gestation period of 12.3 months. The estimated pregnancy rate was 0.10 based on the proportion pregnant mature females in the sample and 0.58 based on the occurrence of Corpora Lutea in the ovaries. The average calving interval was calculated to 2.7 years. The results are important for assessment of fisheries bycatch mortality and conservation and management of Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in western Indian Ocean

  • 44.
    Amir, Omar A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Berggren, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Ndaro, Simon
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Feeding ecology of the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops aduncus) incidentally caught in the gillnet fisheriesoff Zanzibar, Tanzania2005In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 63, no 3, 429-437 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The stomach contents of 26 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus) incidentally caught in gillnet fisheries aroundUnguja Island (Zanzibar) between February 2000 and August 2002 were examined. The relative importance of each prey species wasassessed through indices of relative importance. In total, 1403 prey items comprising 50 species of bony fish and three species ofsquid were identified from food remains. Five species of fish, Uroconger lepturus, Synaphobranchus kaupii, Apogon apogonides,Lethrinus crocineus, Lutjanus fulvus, and three species of squid, Sepioteuthis lessoniana, Sepia latimanus and Loligo duvauceli, werethe most important prey species. Based on an index that included frequency of occurrence, percentage by number and by weight,Uroconger lepturus proved to be the most important prey species of mature dolphins whereas Apogon apogonides was the preferredprey of immature dolphins. These results indicate that Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Zanzibar forage ona relatively large number of prey species, but that only a few small- and medium-sized neritic fish and cephalopods contributesubstantially to the diet. Further, the ecology and behavior of the preferred fish prey species indicate that the dolphins forage overreef or soft bottom substrata and near the shore.

  • 45.
    Amir, Omar A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Jiddawi, Narriman
    Berggren, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    The occurrence and distribution of dolphins in Zanzibar, Tanzania, with comments on the differences between two species of Tursiops2005In: Western Indian Ocean journal of marine science, ISSN 0856-860X, Vol. 4, no 1, 85-93 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Incidental catches (bycatch) in gillnet fisheries off Zanzibar (Unguja Island), as asource of mortality among several species of dolphins, were reported in a questionnaire surveyconducted in 1999. As a follow-up to that survey, from January 2000 to August 2003, wemonitored the incidental catches of dolphins collected from 12 fish landing sites. Six species ofdolphins were recorded from 143 specimens retrieved from bycatches in drift- and bottom setgillnets. Of these, 68 (48%) were Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), 44 (31%) spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris), 12 (8%) Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus), 11 (8%) Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis), 6 (4%) Pan-tropical spotted dolphins(Stenella attenuata) and 2 (1%) common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Most of thebycatches (71%) were in nets set off the north coast of Unguja Island. In this paper, bycatchrecords are examined to describe the occurrence and distribution of dolphin species in UngujaIsland coastal waters. The relatively large numbers of bycatch dolphins recorded indicate thatbycatch may be a potential threat to local populations that need to be addressed in futureconservation and management efforts in the region.

  • 46.
    Anders, Gustafsson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi.
    Sexual stature dimorphism in humans.2006Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Jansson, Eeva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Institute of Marine Research, Norway.
    Wennerström, Lovisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Chiriboga, Fidel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Arnyasi, Mariann
    Kent, Matthew P.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Complex genetic diversity patterns of cryptic, sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations in tiny mountain lakes2017In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 18, no 5, 1213-1227 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intraspecific genetic variation can have similar effects as species diversity on ecosystem function; understanding such variation is important, particularly for ecological key species. The brown trout plays central roles in many northern freshwater ecosystems, and several cases of sympatric brown trout populations have been detected in freshwater lakes based on apparent morphological differences. In some rare cases, sympatric, genetically distinct populations lacking visible phenotypic differences have been detected based on genetic data alone. Detecting such cryptic sympatric populations without prior grouping of individuals based on phenotypic characteristics is more difficult statistically, though. The aim of the present study is to delineate the spatial connectivity of two cryptic, sympatric genetic clusters of brown trout discovered in two interconnected, tiny subarctic Swedish lakes. The structures were detected using allozyme markers, and have been monitored over time. Here, we confirm their existence for almost three decades and report that these cryptic, sympatric populations exhibit very different connectivity patterns to brown trout of nearby lakes. One of the clusters is relatively isolated while the other one shows high genetic similarity to downstream populations. There are indications of different spawning sites as reflected in genetic structuring among parr from different creeks. We used > 3000 SNPs on a subsample and find that the SNPs largely confirm the allozyme pattern but give considerably lower F (ST) values, and potentially indicate further structuring within populations. This type of complex genetic substructuring over microgeographical scales might be more common than anticipated and needs to be considered in conservation management.

  • 48.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Johansson, Frank
    Sundbom, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ryman, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lack of trophic polymorphism despite substantial genetic differentiation in sympatric brown trout (Salmo trutta) populations2017In: Ecology of Freshwater Fish, ISSN 0906-6691, E-ISSN 1600-0633, Vol. 26, no 4, 643-652 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sympatric populations occur in many freshwater fish species; such populations are typically detected through morphological distinctions that are often coupled to food niche and genetic separations. In salmonids, trophic and genetically separate sympatric populations have been reported in landlocked Arctic char, whitefish and brown trout. In Arctic char and brown trout rare cases of sympatric, genetically distinct populations have been detected based on genetic data alone, with no apparent morphological differences, that is cryptic structuring. It remains unknown whether such cryptic, sympatric structuring can be coupled to food niche separation. Here, we perform an extensive screening for trophic divergence of two genetically divergent, seemingly cryptic, sympatric brown trout populations documented to remain in stable sympatry over several decades in two interconnected, tiny mountain lakes in a nature reserve in central Sweden. We investigate body shape, body length, gill raker metrics, breeding status and diet (stomach content analysis and stable isotopes) in these populations. We find small significant differences for body shape, body size and breeding status, and no evidence of food niche separation between these two populations. In contrast, fish in the two lakes differed in body shape, diet, and nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures despite no genetic difference between lakes. These genetically divergent populations apparently coexist using the same food resources and showing the same adaptive plasticity to the local food niches of the two separate lakes. Such observations have not been reported previously but may be more common than recognised as genetic screenings are necessary to detect the structures.

  • 49.
    Andersson, Anastasia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Laikre, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Bergvall, Ulrika A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Two shades of boldness: novel object and anti-predator behavior reflect different personality dimensions in domestic rabbits2014In: Journal of ethology, ISSN 0289-0771, E-ISSN 1439-5444, Vol. 32, no 3, 123-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is increasingly common to quantify and describe behavioral variation in domestic and wild animals in terms of personality. Correlating behavioral traits are referred to as personality dimensions or factors and different dimensions have been reported in different species. Boldness is a well-described personality dimension in several species, although some issues remain unclear. Previous models of boldness include both novelty and risk taking, but recent studies indicate that these types of behaviors may reflect separate personality dimensions. In this study, we developed a behavioral test battery for domestic rabbits, and recorded behaviors of 61 individuals in four different situations (novel object, novel arena, social, and predator interactions). We used domestic rabbits as a model because behavioral variation in rabbits has rarely been quantified in terms of personality dimensions, although rabbit behavior is described. We also wanted to investigate behavioral variation in a Swedish rabbit breed of conservation concern - the Gotland rabbit. Factor analysis of the behavioral test measures suggested three personality dimensions: exploration, boldness, and anxiety. Novel object scores clustered in the exploration and boldness factors, whereas scores associated with predator interactions were explained by anxiety, indicating that novel object and anti-predator behavior reflect different personality dimensions in rabbits.

  • 50. Andersson, J.
    et al.
    Borg-Karlson, A-K
    Vongvanich, N.
    Wiklund, C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Zoologisk ekologi.
    Male sex pheromone release and female mate choice in a butterfly.2007In: The Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 210, 964-970 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
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