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  • 1. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Can government support both women and entrepreneurship?2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Entrepreneurship for equality?2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3. Ahl, Helene
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    Tillmar, Malin
    Is institutional support for women’s entrepreneurship feminist?2014In: GWO2014 Book of abstracts: GWO 8th Biennial International Interdisciplinary conference, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4. Alkhaled-Studholme, Sophie
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Reconceptualising ‘freedom and power’ in entrepreneurship discourse: examining motivations and experiences of female entrepreneurs in Saudi Arabia and Sweden2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5. Alvehus, Johan
    et al.
    Jensen, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Organisation2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 6. Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    PART I: Policies for Innovation2012In: Promoting Innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Élisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, 21-24 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7. Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Granat Thorslund, Jennie
    Gunnarsson, Ewa
    Sundin, Elisabeth
    Introduction2012In: Promoting innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, 9-19 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8. Andersson, Susanne
    et al.
    Berglund, KarinStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.Gunnarsson, EwaSundin, Elisabeth
    Promoting Innovation: Policies, practices and procedures2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Promoting Innovation är ett resultat av över tio års satsningar på innovationsforskning med ett genusperspektiv. I antologin presenterar 31 forskare analyser av hur genus är en begränsande struktur i innovationssystemet. Här fokuseras såväl policy som regionala och organisatoriska praktiker. Vidare presenteras procedurer, det vill säga metoder och metodologier för att utveckla genusmedvetna, innovativa organisationer.  Likt ett kalejdoskopiskt skifte framträder andra bilder när ett genusperspektiv tillämpas med möjlighet att se nya möjligheter och innovativa lösningar.

  • 9.
    Aziz, Najibullah
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Smart Devices as U-Learning Tools: Key Factors Influencing Users’ Intention2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There was a lack of knowledge about the user’s acceptance of smart devices as ubiquitous learning (u-learning) tools at higher education institutions in Sweden. As the mobile technology grows, the demand for mobile devices, particularly smart devices increases as well. With the increase in the usage of smart devices, the higher education institutions provide mobile learning platforms to attract more customers in the competitive industry of education. Thus, understanding the key factors from the perspectives of end-users is important for the institutions to survive in the competitive market. This study explores and explains Behavioral and Continuance intentions of students regarding the acceptance and usage of smart devices (Smartphones and Personal Digital Assistants or PDA) as u-learning tools. Key factors related to the users’ intentions to accept and continue using smart devices as u-learning tools were identified and hypothesized in the Swedish context. Ten hypotheses were suggested based on TAM, UTAUT, and ECT. To achieve the aim and objective of this study, a quantitative approach was chosen, and a survey strategy based on purposive and convenience sampling techniques were used. A web-based questionnaire on five-points Likert Scale was designed to collect the required data. 115 (96 valid) students answered the questionnaire. The collected data were used to conduct statistical operations in SPSS. Five hypotheses were supported, and the other five were not. The findings suggest that Performance Expectancy, Perceived Mobility value, Confirmation, and Satisfaction positively influence both Behavioral and Continuance Intentions of students to accept and continue using smart devices as u-learning tools. According to the findings, Confirmation and Satisfaction from ECT can be included as separate constructs in UTAUT and UTAUT2. Higher education institutions planning to have (and those that already have) learning platforms, compatible with smart devices, can benefit from the findings. Higher education institutions can also design their u-learning platforms according to the Performance Expectancy, Perceived Mobility value, Confirmation, and Satisfaction of the students.

  • 10.
    Bay, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Sjödin, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    McGoun, Elton G.
    Bucknell University.
    Gaming the System2011In: International Journal of Critical Accounting, ISSN Online : 1757-9856, Print : 1757-9848, Vol. 3, no 1, 5-17 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores whether financial markets are games, using exchange traded derivatives, those quintessential speculative instruments, as the primary vehicle. The phrase “gaming the system” usually means taking advantage of the system; that is to say, specifically turning some-thing performing a productive social function to one’s own enjoyable ends. But “gaming the system” can also mean generally transforming a system with productive purposes into one whose purpose is enjoyment. Some might say that this is just what has occurred in recent years to financial markets with the explosion in derivatives.

  • 11.
    Bengtsson, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Holmqvist, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Larsson, Rikard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Strategiska allianser: Från marknadsmisslyckande till lärande samarbete1998Book (Other academic)
    Abstract
  • 12.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Bent Flyvbjerg, Todd Landman & Sanford Schram (Eds.). (2012) Real social science: Applied phronesis. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 308 pages2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 3, 455-456 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Discursive diversity in fashioning entrepreneurial identity2006In: Entrepreneurship as Social Change : A Third Movements in Entrepreneurship Book / [ed] Chris Steyaert, Daniel Hjort, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2006, 231-250 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    E viral Essay - Entrepreneurship goes viral: The invention of deviant enterprising selves2015In: M@n@gement, ISSN 1286-4692, E-ISSN 1286-4692, Vol. 18, no 5, 359-362 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Entreprenörskap som kreativt handlingsutrymme2015In: Skolledning: scener från den organiserande vardagen / [ed] Jan Löwstedt, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2015, 95-107 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Fighting against all odds: Entrepreneurship education as employability training2013In: Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, ISSN 2052-1499, E-ISSN 1473-2866, Vol. 13, no 4, 717-735 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper the efforts of transforming ‘regular’ entrepreneurship to a specific kind of ‘entrepreneurial self’ in education are linked to the materialization of employability. It will be illustrated that schoolchildren, under the guise of entrepreneurship education, are taught how to work on improving their selves, emphasizing positive thinking, the joy of creating and awareness of the value of their own interests and passions. This ethic reminds us that we can always improve ourselves, since the enterprising self can never fully be acquired. The flipside of this ethic is that, by continuously being encouraged to become our best, it may be difficult to be satisfied with who we are. Highlighted in this paper is that, with all the amusement and excitement present in entrepreneurship education, also comes an expectation of the individual to fight against all odds. Recruiting students to this kind of shadow-boxing with their selves should involve critical reflection on its political dimensions, human limits, alternative ideals and the collective efforts that are part of entrepreneurial endeavours.

  • 17.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Kärt barn har många namn: Om entreprenörskaps alla (o)möjliga former2013In: Företagsekonomin och samhället / [ed] Hans Hasselbladh, Mikael Holmqvist, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 167-196 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    När det oavsedda utmanar spelreglerna…2006In: Den oavsedda organisationen / [ed] Daniel Ericsson, Academia adacta, 2006, 108-134 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Berglund, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    The queer potential of women entrepreneurs2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Berglund, Karin Anna Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Using pictures and artefacts in a PAR process to disclose new wor(l)ds of entrepreneurship2012In: Action Research, ISSN 1476-7503, E-ISSN 1741-2617, Vol. 10, no 3, 276-292 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on Freire, this article elaborates on how pictures and artefacts benefit processes of 'prise de conscience' and 'conscientization' among those with powerful voices. Wor(l)d-making was unfolded in the Swedish think-and-do tank, 'the Smithy', emphasizing the intrinsically political nature of promoting 'societal entrepreneurship' (SE). New words for SE were formulated and a more inclusive world was discerned where all had a role, not just as 'helpers', but as equal members of SE practices. Pictures and artefacts enabled hitherto silenced stories to be told and created a common understanding of how SE contrasted with traditional entrepreneurship. When new words were added to entrepreneurship, it was possible to reflect on the actions taken within the Smithy in a deeper sense, not only focusing on actions for the entrepreneurs 'out there', but also initiating self-reflection on the roles all had in the Smithy, or in other settings, to promote SE.

  • 21.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Annika, Skoglund
    Social entrepreneurship: to defend society from itself2016In: Rethinking entrepreneurship: debating research orientations / [ed] Alain Fayolle, Philippe Riot, Routledge, 2016, 57-77 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Birkelöf, Frida
    Lundin, Johanna
    Löfgren, Annika
    Engaged Sisters: studying the entrepreneurship and innovation support system from ‘within’2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship and innovation support has grown into large institutions in a society that cherishes an enterprising culture. Individuals are encouraged to be entrepreneurial and innovative in general, and to start up their own companies in particular. To support individuals in their business creation processes, policy stresses the need of providing with measures. Together these measures comprise a support system, directed towards supporting new and established entrepreneurs. It has however been recognized that the entrepreneurship and innovation public support system is highly gendered, favoring men and male businesses, whilst programs targeting women put the onus on individual women to start and grow businesses. As well it has been recognized that the policy support system tends to exclude ‘othered’ groups rather than including them in enterprising activities. The subtext of entrepreneurship support points to how some people “are” entrepreneurs, whilst others need support in order to become more entrepreneurial. Hence, there is a need to change the support system of entrepreneurship and innovation since it tends to disempower rather than to empower ‘othered’ groups in society.

    “Sisters in Business” make up an organization of wo/men entrepreneurs who have joined forces to address this need. Their vision is that entrepreneurship should reflect the society at large. During the last year they have therefore taken several initiatives to make this happen and is today one of the support organizations in a medium sized Swedish town. In this paper three Sisters are working together with a researcher within this area. Together we have formed a group of “engaged sisters´”. In our dialogue the dichotomy between ‘practice’ and ‘theory’ have temporarily dissolved in favor of creating narratives, from episodes, experiences and the everyday life of sister´s, to illustrate how the support system works from ‘within’. This led us to questioning whether the ‘support system’ really is a support system, or something else? Furthermore, this insight made it apparent that there exists ‘other’ support system, tough concealed and silenced. Finally, suggestions are proposed for how ‘practitioners’ can work together with ‘academics’ to change the rules of the game.

  • 23.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Brännback, Malin
    Åbu University.
    Carsrud, Alan
    Understanding The Entrepreneur and Innovator Nexus as a Basis for the Coming of the Science of the Artificial2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Dahlin, Maria
    Tilling, Katarina
    Johansson, Ulf
    Book review: Making Sense of Intellectual Capital: Designing a Method for the Valuation of Intangibles2005In: The European Accounting Review, ISSN 0963-8180, E-ISSN 1468-4497, Vol. 14, no 3, 160-162 p.Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Gaddefors, Johan
    SLU.
    Entrepreneurship Requires Resistance to be Mobilized2010In: (De)Mobilizing entrepreneurship : Exploring entrepreneurial thinking and action / [ed] Bill Frederic, Bjerke Björn and Johansson Anders W., Edward Elgar Publishing, 2010, 140-157 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Granat Thorslund, Jennie
    Innovative policies? Entrepreneurship and innovation policy from a gender perspective2012In: Promoting innovation: Policies, practices and procedures / [ed] Susanne Andersson, Karin Berglund, Ewa Gunnarsson, Elisabeth Sundin, Stockholm: Vinnova , 2012, 25-46 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Innovation and entrepreneurship are no longer two words that only assist in describing societal phenomena of “newness”, “change” and “diffusion”; they have also grown into important policy areas for assisting the European Union Member States to estab-lish conditions for creating economic growth, new jobs and social cohesion. Our inter-est lies in understanding the gender dimension of innovation and entrepreneurship policy. Do entrepreneurship and innovation policies consolidate, adapt to, challenge, or even transform the gender system? The gender system is referred to here as a theo-retical concept which recognises how men and women are separated in society, hori-zontally as well as vertically. This chapter provides a discourse analysis of two texts within the framework of the Lisbon Strategy - Innovative Sweden (2004) and the Green Paper of Entrepreneurship (European Commisson, 2003), with the aim of look-ing into how innovation and entrepreneurship policies are gendered.

  • 27.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Holmgren, Carina
    Entrepreneurship Education in Policy and Practice2013In: International Journal of Entrepreneurial Venturing, ISSN 1742-5360, E-ISSN 1742-5379, Vol. 5, no 1, 9-27 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article pays interest to the intersection between policy and practice when implementing entrepreneurship in the educational system. Taking a point of departure in Mahieu’s (2006) call for knowledge of the interplay between different policy levels and Backström-Widjeskog’s (2010) conclusion about tensions occurring when teachers are introduced to the concept, the intention is to develop knowledge about conflicts and tensions at the intersection between policy and practice. From analysing policy documents and narratives from entrepreneurship education implementation projects during a time when entrepreneurship education started to be promoted in Sweden three figures of thought are found (economic/humanistic, biological/social, and individual/collective) which are proposed to be involved in creating tensions and conflicts in the intersection between policy and practice. Theoretically, these figures of thought can be seen as a contribution to understanding processes in which the concept of entrepreneurship education has deliberately been moved, by way of policy, to the educational practice. Reflecting on these thought figures may enhance teachers’ translation processes when starting to work with entrepreneurship education in practice.

  • 28.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Janne, Tienari
    The Paradox of Alternative Entrepreneurship: Doing, Undoing & Redoing Gender in a Contested Space2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Jerregård, Helena
    Jag tar ett steg i taget: barns tankar om ingenjören, teknik och arbetsliv2013In: Bilden av ingenjören / [ed] Yvonne Eriksson, Ildikó Asztalos Morell, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2013, 266-297 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Johannisson, BengtSchwartz, Birgitta
    Societal entrepreneurship: positioning, penetrating, promoting2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurship generally is about creative organizing but with social enterprising this is especially so. Most social ventures cross the boundaries between the private, the public and the non-profit/voluntary sectors. This broad involvement of actors and intertwining of sectors makes the label ‘societal’ entrepreneurship appropriate. Stating the importance of both the local and the broader societal context, the book reports close-up studies from a variety of social ventures. Generic themes include positioning societal entrepreneurship against other images of collective entrepreneurship, critically penetrating its assumptions and practices and proposing ways of promoting societal entrepreneurship more widely. Providing a new conceptual framework and research methodology, this compendium will prove insightful for academic scholars. The basic concepts and illustrative cases/stories will also appeal to students and reflective practitioners.

  • 31.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Johansson, Anders W.
    Dark and bright effects of a polarized entrepreneurship discourse… and the prospects of transformation2012In: Societal Entrepreneurship: positioning, penetrating, promoting / [ed] Karin Berglund, Bengt Johannisson, Birgitta Schwartz, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2012, 163-190 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Johansson, Anders W
    Linneus University.
    Entrepreneurship, Discourses and Conscientization in Processes of Regional Development2007In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 19, no 6, 499-525 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based upon a regional development project in a ‘vulnerable’ Swedish region consisting of three municipalities. At a first glance, this is a region in decline that is lacking in entrepreneurial initiatives. During a crucial time period the project ‘Diversity in Entrepreneurship’ (DiE) was launched to help the region to become more entrepreneurial and inclusive. An underlying logic was built into the project, which is associated with the critical pedagogy of Paolo Freire. From a Freirean perspective regions lacking in entrepreneurship could be reconsidered emphasizing that the entrepreneurial initiatives are always there – latent – however restrained by certain discourses; in this case a dominant enterprise discourse. Above all the enterprise discourse suppresses the ability for particular groups in society to view themselves as entrepreneurs. The purpose of this paper is to introduce Freire’s critical pedagogical perspective to entrepreneurship and regional development. An episode illustrating how the enterprise discourse suppresses an equality discourse, introduced by way of the DiE- project, makes the point of departure for discussing the process of ‘conscientization’, which refers to a type of learning that is focused on perceiving and exposing contradictions and to take action against the oppressive elements of reality (Freire 1970). Some key Freirean ideas or concepts are explained, first as they were expressed by Freire and then applied to entrepreneurship and regional development. It is then discussed how these concepts found their expressions in the project. The critical pedagogic perspective not only emphasizes an entrepreneurial potential in every individual, but it also gives an idea of what kind of processes could release entrepreneurial initiatives among those who do not view themselves as entrepreneurs. 

  • 33.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Lindberg, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Transformation from entrepreneurship to entrepreneurships: creating alternatives?2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper our ambition is to provide with theoretical and empirical inspiration for studying contemporary constitutions of entrepreneurship. In specific, we seek to highlight how the transformation from entrepreneurship into forms of entrepreneurships has unfolded on various arenas. This means tracing the interplay between criticism of (traditional) entrepreneurship and the outbreak and dissemination of alternative entrepreneurships. In specific, we focus on the positive connotations that come with the alternative forms, a goodness that lures behind each and every corner, to see what it shapes as well as what shape entrepreneurship takes. Even if entrepreneurship research does pay some interest to the changing conditions for entrepreneurship, it seldom links these to changes in conditions for people, organizations and societies.

  • 34.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Lindgren, Monica
    Packedorff, Johann
    Otherness in discourse, otherness in practice: Gendered notions of entrepreneurship in Swedish school education2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Pettersson, Katarina
    SLU.
    Will the recognition of women entrepreneurs advance gender equality?: Theorising the gendering of the enterprising self,2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Redmalm, David
    Skoglund, Annika
    Sensitizing entrepreneurship: The shaping of a FemInc.ist entrepreneurship of care2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Schwartz, Birgitta
    Holding on the anomaly of social entrepreneurship: dilemmas in starting up and running a fair-trade enterprise2013In: Journal of Social Entrepreneurship, ISSN 1942-0676, E-ISSN 1942-0684, Vol. 4, no 3, 237-255 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The different shapes taken on by social entrepreneurship in contemporary society show that social goals are integrated by commercial enterprises and commercial goals are incorporated by organisations with a social mission. Combining a social mission with commercial goals is often presented as a ‘win-win’ situation. In this article, we highlight the potential tensions and conflicts created by the conflicting demands and expectations when the institutional non-profit and for-profit logics meet in social entrepreneuring. From this viewpoint, social entrepreneurship is an anomaly, which seems difficult to resolve. Despite this, we often read descriptions of social entrepreneurs as heroes, which show how social entrepreneurship is glorified and part of the marketisation of society. This article sets out to present a more complex and problematic picture of practising social entrepreneurship where the obvious ‘win-win’ situations more often appear as ‘win-lose’ and sometimes even as ‘lose-lose’. From a three-year ethnographic study of an emerging fair-trade enterprise, the concept of disharmony shows that dilemmas are part of everyday life in social entrepreneuring. Instead of posing insoluble conflicts, dilemmas light the way for the individual social entrepreneur. They are managed through temporary rationalisation; finding a way to integrate conflicting demands into the life of a social entrepreneur. Disharmony includes moments of identity struggle, but is also a learning process in which the social entrepreneur tries to understand the difference between what she does and what she actually achieves.

  • 38.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Skoglund, Annika
    Uppsala University.
    Entrepreneurship and the Enterprising Self: Creating alternatives through entrepreneurship education?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Tillmar, Malin
    To play or not to play: that is the question: entrepreneuring as gendered play2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 31, no 2, 206-218 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How can play be used to unravel the discourse of the gendered hero entrepreneur and instead describe mundane entrepreneuring? Further, how can the doing of gendered social orders be problematized when entrepreneuring is equated with play? In this article we answer these questions by engaging with the French social theorist Caillois’ (1961) conceptualization of play as being at the heart of all higher culture. Two ethnographic cases act as our vehicle in analysing play as entrepreneuring. From a rich description of these cases we find that it is not a question of playing or not playing, but about how to play. All four forms of play described by Caillois are present, which illustrates the variation of entrepreneuring and the richness of activities conducted in the ‘doing of entrepreneurship’. Further, both ways of playing discussed by Caillois are found. Whilst these two ways are interrelated on a continuum in the theory of play, they have been separated in entrepreneurship discourse, where they underpin the tendency to differentiate between the hero entrepreneur and ordinary people. Finally, we engage in a more interpretive and reflective discussion on entrepreneuring as performative acts through which social orders can be not only reproduced but also transformed.

  • 40.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren, Caroline
    Ethnographic approaches to entrepreneurship and small business research: What lessons can we learn?2014In: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Small Business and Entrepreneurship / [ed] Alan L. Carsrud, Malin Brännback, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, 201-227 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Professor Paul Reynolds said in a speech that entrepreneurs quickly learn how to tell the polished stories about their journeys when they are asked by researchers and journalists about what they have done and achieved. The notion of polished stories is also recognized byWilliam Gartner (2007) in a special issue on narrative, reflecting upon the fact that he can name dozens of entrepreneurs, and he has several logico-scientific descriptions, explanations, categories, concepts and hypotheses about entrepreneurs, but he cannot say much about their stories. Consequently, it has been argued that the field of entrepreneurship studies needs new concepts if it is to take seriously the ambition to understand entrepreneurs, entrepreneurship and entrepreneuring (e.g. Hjorth et al., 2003; Johannisson, 2011; Steyaert, 2007; Gartner, 2007; Huse and Landström, 1997). In this chapter we will show how entrepreneurship and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can be researched through the ethnographic method, focusing on understanding the social context of a certain phenomenon or person. Specifically, four ethnographic studies are introduced, which will be discussed as themes: context; the role of the researcher; the research process; and lessons learned.

  • 41.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    A picture is worth a thousand words… but an artifact is worth a changed world2012In: Curiosity and Serendipity - a conference on qualitative methodsin the social sciences: Abstracts, 2012, 79-79 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Berglund, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Wigren-Kristoferson, Caroline
    Societal Entrepreneurship: The shaping of a different story of entrepreneurship2011In: Tamara Journal, ISSN 1532-5555, E-ISSN 1545-6420, Vol. 10, no 1, 9-22 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he interest in societal forms of entrepreneurship has increased in recent decades, emphasizing different kinds of prefixed such as ―social‖ ―ecological‖, ―sustainable‖, ―regional‖. In this article societal and social is at stake. Taking a point of departure in the prefix stories of entrepreneurship we read a wish to break with the grand narrative of entrepreneurship as well as attempts to feed into and draw legitimacy from the grand narrative. In this article we take a point of departure in an initiative taken in Sweden to introduce and finance a program labeled ―Societal entrepreneurship‖. The purpose is to create knowledge about, as well as conditions for, initiatives aiming at improving what is missing or does not work in public structures, and finding new and innovative solutions in order to create an economically, socially and ecologically sustainable society. Applying Burke‘s pentad it is illustrated that the grand narrative of entrepreneurship consists of the heroic entrepreneur (agent) who creates a kingdom (act) by way of establishing a company (agency) on the market in order to make a profit and contribute to growth (purpose). Applying the concept of Tamara, introduced by Boje, it is further illustrated how the grand narrative of entrepreneurship emphasizes capitalism, rationality and hierarchy in line with the epoch of industrialization, whilst the antenarrative of societal entrepreneurship gives priority to both premodern and postmodern discourses. The importance of community, of non-economic values, artisan craftsmanship is stressed, but also of how societal structures must be changed. The story of societal entrepreneurship thus de-centers human agency seeking to create instability as well as openings for enactment. 

  • 43. Bird, A
    et al.
    Fang, Tony
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Cross cultural management in the age of globalization2009In: International Journal of Cross Cultural Management, ISSN 1470-5958, E-ISSN 1741-2838, Vol. 9, no 2, 139-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Choi, Soki
    et al.
    Holmberg, Ingalill
    Löwstedt, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School, Management & Organisation.
    Brommels, Mats
    Managing clinical integration: a comparative study in a merged university hospital2012In: Journal of Health Organisation & Management, ISSN 1477-7266, E-ISSN 1758-7247, Vol. 26, no 4, 486-507 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - This paper explores critical factors that may obstruct or advance integration efforts initiated by the clinical management following a hospital merger. The aim is to increase our understanding of why clinical integration succeeds or fails.

    Design/methodology/approach - We compare two cases of integration efforts following the Karolinska University Hospital merger in Sweden. Each case represents two merged departments of the same specialty from each hospital site. We conducted 53 interviews with individuals representing various staff categories and collected documents to check data consistency.

    Findings - The study identifies three critical factors that seem to be instrumental for the process and outcome of integration efforts – clinical management’s 1) interpretation of the mandate, 2) design of the management constellation and 3) approach to integration. Obstructive factors are: a sole focus on the formal assignment from the top; individual leadership; and the use of a classic, planned, top-down management approach. Supportive factors are: paying attention to multiple stakeholders; shared leadership; and the use of an emergent, bottom-up management approach within planned boundaries. These findings are basically consistent with the literature’s prescriptions for managing professional organisations.

    Practical implications - Managers need to understand that public healthcare organisations are based on multiple logics that need to be handled in a balanced way if clinical integration is to be achieved – especially the tension between managerialism and professionalism.

    Originality/value - By focusing on the merger consequences for clinical units, this paper addresses an important gap in the healthcare merger literature.

  • 45.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Learning to strategize in the multinational firm: The role of positioning between experts and novices2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Realizing Strategy: The Dialectics of Teaching by Doing and Learning by Immersion in Practice2010In: / [ed] Strategic Management Society (SMS) conference, Rome, 12-15 September, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Demir, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Scenarios of (dis)organizing decision base through enterprise systems 2005In: EAMSA conference proceedings, “The Transfer of Organisational Practices: Enhancing Competitiveness in Asia/Pacific-European Business Relationships. , 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Demir, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Yaklef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    The Internet and Cross-Border Intermediaries 2006In: The Euro-Asia Management Studies Association (EAMSA) Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 23-25 November.    / [ed] the Euro-Asia Management Studies Association (EAMSA) Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 23-25 November., 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Di Gangi, Paul
    et al.
    Loyola University Maryland - Baltimore, MD.
    Teigland, Robin
    Stockholm School of Economics - Stockholm, Sweden.
    Flåten, Björn-Tore
    University of Agder - Kristiansand, Norway.
    Giovacchini, Elia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    Are we in this together?  Exploring private-collective knowledge communities2011In: ICIS 2011 PROCEEDINGS, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A growing trend within the literature on value creation is the introduction of private-collective knowledge communities, which create opportunities for organizations to leverage knowledge. In these communities, participants privately invest in a project’s success by freely revealing and contributing their personal resources such as expertise and time to a public good. Firms then use these public goods as the basis for their own product offering. In this paper, we focus on describing the nature of the relationships that exist within private-collective knowledge communities and subsequently develop a framework for how researchers and practitioners can understand the organization-user dynamics found within these communities. As such, our research questions are as follows: What factors impact the organization-user dynamics in private-collective knowledge communities and how do these factors affect the nature of the relationships within these communities? We conclude with initial results supporting our model and discuss future steps, limitations, and contributions.

  • 50.
    Fabel, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business, Management & Organisation.
    E-deltagandets potential: En explorativ studie av hur offentliga myndigheter möter sociala medier2011Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Internet has been transformed. The new Internet, Web 2.0, is all about interactivity, communication and conversations. Citizens and stakeholders demand transparency and influence. The individuals that contribute their knowledge and views demand insight into how their contribution is used to develop the organization, or they leave the conversation. At the same time the Swedish parliament requires improved efficiency, availability and access to government services.

    Previous research shows there is a trend towards issue arenas where issues and topics, not organizations, are at the center of communication. The emergence of e-government represents a paradigm shift, from emphasizing standardization and cost-efficiency, to an emphasis on coordinated network building, external collaboration, and customer services. This transformation from bureaucracy to networked governance requires new strategies.

    To explore these trends and phenomena research interviews have been conducted with representatives for three Swedish government agencies. The empirical findings have then been illuminated with neo-institutional theory and analyzed with governance and communication strategy concepts and theories.

    The findings show that the three agencies have taken some small steps toward the virtual issue arenas. Some employees participate in social media, but the participation isn’t formalized and knowledge isn’t aggregated within the organizations. The general knowledge of social media is low and there seems to be institutionalized myths affecting the decision environment. Management consists of members of similar age. Top management from different agencies in the sector frequently meets, and the agencies await and follow the other agencies examples.

    The new e-logic challenges existing power structures, as well as the myth of authority, since external actors gain power over business development. In order to fully participate in the conversation in virtual issue arenas, a change in organizational culture is likely needed, and potentially generational change might be necessary to facilitate the change in culture. Engaging in a few, carefully selected e-projects will enable the agencies to learn and expand the engagement gradually. The accumulated experience may lead to a change in the institutionalized myths, thus enabling the predicted paradigm shift.

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