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  • 1.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Beyond Mrs consumer: competing femininities in Swedish advertising trade publications, 1900–19392018In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 66, no 2, p. 153-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article follows the discussion on female consumers in Swedish advertising journals and handbooks. The aim is to problematise the gendered aspects of Swedish consumer and early advertising history, by studying how the notion of the female consumer intersected with notions of social class, marital status and sexuality. The article also closes in on the persons who were invited to embody the consuming women and what kind of interests they represented. The article concludes that, from the start of the twentieth century, gender and class was prevalent in the advertising literature. The married woman was also from the start seen as the head of the consuming family. Therefore, reaching her through advertising became key for facilitating the relations between producer and consumer. With time, different women's organisations, the weekly press, and new theories of advertising from the US addressing the notion of 'Mrs Consumer' came to influence the Swedish advertising trade press. The result became the favouring of a certain kind of middle class, urban and rational kind of femininity, strongly connected to homemaking and women's roles in purchasing for the family. However, this femininity also paralleled notions of 'the flapper' and the professional woman.

  • 2.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Husz, Orsi
    From the great department store with love: Window display and the transfer of commercial knowledge in early twentieth-century Sweden2018In: History of Retailing and Consumption, ISSN 2373-518X, E-ISSN 2373-5171, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 126-155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article highlights the transfers and practical uses of thecommercial knowledge of window dressing in early twentieth-century Sweden through the analysis of the professional careerand family business of Oscar Lundkvist, Swedish display pioneerand former window dresser in chief of the largest and firstSwedish department store,Nordiska Kompaniet. Building on richsource material including unique written and photographicdocuments from the Lundkvist family, educational material andtrade journals, we show how the innovative and spectacularbecame ordinary and mundane in retail praxis. We argue that theemergence and professionalization of window display broughtwith it the dissemination and trivialization of the same practice.By focusing on not only the most conspicuous aspects andcultural meanings of window displays but also on the materialsand competences involved, we explain how setting up thedisplays became an everyday commercial practice and how it waspositioned between advertising and retail as well as between theartistic and the commercial.

  • 3.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Sundevall, FiaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.Tjeder, David
    Könspolitiska nyckeltexter: Del 1, Från äktenskapskritik till sexualupplysning 1839-19302018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Sundevall, FiaStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.Tjeder, David
    Könspolitiska nyckeltexter: Från Det går an till #metoo2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Backman, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The European Union's capacities for managing crises2018In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 261-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article draws on a comprehensive new data set of crisis management capacities at the European Union level to highlight key patterns in their development and use. Organised within the categories of detection, sense-making, decision-making, coordination, meaning-making, communication, and accountability, the data show considerable accumulation of capacities in detection and sense-making, while decision-making capacities lag behind. We find that most capacities are sector-oriented rather than cross-sectoral, and reside primarily within the European Commission rather than other EU institutions. Comparing the data to previous studies, we note that capacities overall are increasing and some are undergoing evolution; for example, horizon-scanning tools once limited to collecting information have increasingly been given an analytical, information enrichment function akin to sense-making.

  • 6.
    Bengtsson, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Borg, Stefan
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Assembling European health security: Epidemic intelligence and the hunt for cross-border health threats2019In: Security Dialogue, ISSN 0967-0106, E-ISSN 1460-3640, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 115-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The securitization of health concerns within the European Union has hitherto received scant attention compared to other sectors. Drawing on the conceptual toolbox of actor-network theory, this article examines how a ‘health security assemblage’ rooted in EU governance has emerged, expanded, and stabilized. At the heart of this assemblage lies a particular knowledge regime, known as epidemic intelligence (EI): a vigilance-oriented approach of early detection and containment drawing on web-scanning tools and other informal sources. Despite its differences compared to entrenched traditions in public health, EI has, in only a decade’s time, gained central importance at the EU level. EI is simultaneously constituted by, and performative of, a particular understanding of health security problems. By ‘following the actor’, this article seeks to account for how EI has made the hunt for potential health threats so central that detection and containment, rather than prevention, have become the preferred policy options. This article draws out some of the implications of this shift.

  • 7.
    Bengtsson, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Borg, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    European security and early warning systems: from risks to threats in the European Union’s health security sector2018In: European Security, ISSN 0966-2839, E-ISSN 1746-1545, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article critically examines a poorly understood aspect of the European security landscape: early warning systems (EWSs). EWSs are socio-technical systems designed to detect, analyse, and disseminate knowledge on potential security issues in a wide variety of sectors. We first present an empirical overview of more than 80 EWS in the European Union. We then draw on debates in Critical Security Studies to help us make sense of the role of such systems, tapping into conceptual debates on the construction of security issues as either "threat" or "risk" related. Finally, we study one EWS - the Early Warning and Response System for infectious diseases - to understand how it works and how it reconciles risk versus threat-based security logics. Contrary to assumptions of a clear distinction between risk-and threat-based logics of security, we show that EWSs may serve as a "transmission belt" for the movement of issues from risk into threats.

  • 8.
    Bengtsson, Louise
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Securitisation across borders: the case of ‘health security’ cooperation in the European Union2019In: West European Politics, ISSN 0140-2382, E-ISSN 1743-9655, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 346-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global health governance has increasingly become articulated and acted upon in ways that emphasise ‘health security’. This article applies a collective securitisation approach to understand how a particular governance regime has evolved at the European level, one concerned with large-scale ‘threats’ to public health and societies at large. The analysis shows that alongside elite-level securitisation moves, transnational professional networks and bureaucratic actors have also taken part both as securitising agents and audience, with outcomes reflected not only in policy change but also new EU-specific surveillance technologies, institutional structures, and information-sharing platforms. While these developments are partially interlinked with global trends, we show that the EU has gradually institutionalised its own approach to health security. This new status quo is enshrined in a legal framework and set of practices with an all-hazards approach targeting preparedness, early detection and containment of ‘serious cross-border threats to health’ of any origin – beyond infectious disease.

  • 9.
    Berg, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Ericsson, Martin
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Rösträtt för alla? Begränsningar i rösträtten efter 19212018In: Rösträttens århundrade: Kampen, utvecklingen och framtiden för demokratin i Sverige / [ed] Ulrika Holgersson, Lena Wängnerud, Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 219-239Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10. Bossong, Raphael
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Terrorism and Transnational Crime in Europe: A Role for Strategy?2018In: EU Security Strategies: Extending the EU System of Security Governance / [ed] Spyros Economides, James Sperling, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11. Brattberg, Erik
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Multilevel Governance and Complex Threats: The Case of Pandemic Preparedness in the European Union and the United States2011In: Global Health Governance, ISSN 1939-2389, E-ISSN 1939-2389, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scale of dangers posed by influenza pandemics, combined with a series of actual outbreaks, has led policymakers in both the European Union (EU) and the United States (US) to frame the issue as a security threat and to call for extraordinary action. In the US, the 2006 and 2010 National Security Strategies identified pandemics as a “catastrophic challenge” while the 2006 US Pandemic Plan argued that “pandemics should be viewed as a national security issue.” The EU’s 2008 review of its own European Security Strategy broadened the scope of threats facing the continent to include pandemic influenza. Identifying an influenza pandemic as a security threat, however, is relatively easily done. More challenging is to act upon that designation, through implementing security strategies in practice and managing governance processes in multi-level governance systems. Drawing upon securitization theory and traditional implementation theory, this article compares the extent to which the EU and the US have turned words into action on pandemic preparation. The findings show that increasingly securitized rhetoric following the H5N1 and H1N1 outbreaks has indeed been followed by new policies, structures, and operational capacities. As such, the article provides preliminary evidence that securitizing a public policy problem can increase political leverage over administrative processes of implementation.

  • 12.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Why national and international legitimacy beliefs are linked: Social trust as an antecedent factor2018In: The Review of International Organizations, ISSN 1559-7431, E-ISSN 1559-744XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent public opinion research has established an empirical regularity of unusual stability and strength: citizen beliefs in the legitimacy of national and international institutions are highly linked. The dominant interpretation of this link holds that citizens draw on their perceptions of national institutions as a heuristic when forming opinions about international institutions. This article proposes an alternative mechanism, privileging social trust as an antecedent factor contributing to both national and international legitimacy beliefs. Using original survey data on citizen attitudes toward four international institutions in three countries, the article provides evidence for social trust as an antecedent factor, while granting no support for the dominant interpretation. The article suggests three broader implications: social trust has more far-reaching consequences for international cooperation than previously understood; political efforts to affect the legitimacy of international institutions are constrained by individual predispositions; and a comparative approach is central to the study of public attitudes toward international institutions.

  • 13.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Schlipphak, Bernd
    Legitimacy beliefs towards global governance institutions: a research agenda2019In: Journal of European Public Policy, ISSN 1350-1763, E-ISSN 1466-4429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Legitimacy is central to the functioning of global governance institutions (GGIs) such as the European Union (EU) and the United Nations. There is a vibrant debate about legitimacy in International Relations, and a burgeoning literature in comparative politics on public attitudes towards the EU. Yet, these literatures rarely speak to each other, which has resulted in missed opportunities for theoretical advancements on the sources and consequences of citizens’ legitimacy beliefs vis-à-vis GGIs. To assist researchers in advancing on this state of the art, this research note develops a conceptualization of popular legitimacy as a multidimensional belief system including both moral convictions and self-interest. A statistical analysis of public attitudes towards the EU from 1973 to 2012 suggests that commonly used survey measures capture self-interest rather than moral beliefs. This note concludes by suggesting a research agenda intended to push theory and survey research on legitimacy beliefs towards GGIs forward.

  • 14.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Hegelund, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The Business Cycle in Historical Perspective: Reconstructing Quarterly Data on Swedish GDP, 1913-20142018In: Journal of European Economic History, ISSN 0391-5115, E-ISSN 2499-8281, no 1, p. 33-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an estimation of quarterly GDP for Sweden stretchingback to 1913, using higher frequency series on manufacturing andprivate consumption as indicators and standard methods for tem-poral disaggregation from annual GDP data. Deseasonalization isperformed using JDemetra+ software. We use the Bry-Boschan al-gorithm to identify peaks and troughs, based on which we presentvarious chronologies of the business cycle in Sweden, indicating apartially new picture of the country’s economic growth over the last100 years.

  • 15.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Jacobson, TorWaldenström, Daniel
    Sveriges Riksbank and the History of Central Banking2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Written in celebration of its 350th anniversary in 2018, this book details the history of the central bank of Sweden, Sveriges Riksbank, as presented by Klas Fregert. It relates the bank's history to the development of other major central banks around the world. Chapters are written by some of the more prominent scholars in the field of monetary economics and economic history. These chapters include an analysis of the Bank of England written by Charles Goodhart; the evolution of banking in America, written by Barry Eichengreen; a first account of the People's Bank of China, written by Franklin Allen, Xian Gu, and Jun Qian; as well as a chapter about the brief but important history of the European Central Bank, written by Otmar Issing.

  • 16.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study (SCAS), Sweden.
    Tarek Gad, Christoffer
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Assessing trade in the mercantilist era: evidence from a new database on foreign trade of Sweden – Finland, 1738–18052018In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 226-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a newly constructed database on foreign trade of Sweden–Finland 1738–1805, consisting of all exports and imports that were recorded by the custom houses in this period, and is made available at www.historia.se/Swedish foreign trade 1738_1805.xlsx. The traditional view as presented by Eli Heckscher, who was very critical of the mercantilist policies of the time, was that the overseas trade of Sweden-Finland saw a trend of secular stagnation during the course of the eighteenth century. By contrast, we show that in conjunction with a substantial expansion of the population, total trade nearly increased twofold during the period of study. Despite that, there was a small decrease in the value of exports in relation to GDP, mostly explained by a drop in the relative price of bar iron. The degree of specialisation of Swedish exports saw a declining tendency in this period. While exports from Sweden had a higher degree of specialisation than Finnish exports, imported goods to Finland were more concentrated than Swedish imports. Lastly, the composition of imports did not markedly alter, meaning that a consumer revolution did not take place in either Sweden or Finland.

  • 17.
    Fedchenko, Vitaly
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. SIPRI.
    Nuclear Security in the Black Sea Region: Contested Spaces, National Capacities and Multinational Potential2018Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Vad betyder det att musik är ”live”?2018In: Musikens makt / [ed] Jenny Björkman, Arne Jarrick, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2018, p. 217-232Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Fleischer, Rasmus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Kullenberg, Christopher
    The Political Significance of Spotify in Sweden – Analysing the #backaspotify Campaign using Twitter Data2018In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the political significance of the streaming music company Spotify in Sweden, taking as a case a coordinated campaign in late spring 2016, known by the hashtag #backaspotify (translated as “support Spotify!”), which was mainly played out on the social media platform Twitter. The campaign is analysed using a set of data retrieved from Twitter, examining both the content and the interactions in 1,791 messages. Results show that the main political issue concerned the lack of access to rented apartments in central Stockholm, and that the main actors in the campaign were predominantly associated with public affairs consultants and the youth wings of political parties belonging to the centre-right. The campaign, however, was very short-lived and had diminished significantly already after two days. We conclude that Spotify transcends its role as a streaming music company, and additionally can be used as a point of reference in political campaigns to promote issues that are of wider scope than the music industry alone.

  • 20.
    Franzén, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Hus, gårdar och gatubodar: Fastighetspriser i Stockholm och Arboga 1300–16002018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 227-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Houses, yards and sheds: Real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, 1300-1600

    The article explores real property prices in Swedish trading towns 1297-1600 based on c. 2900 transactions in Stockholm and the smaller town of Arboga. A consumer price index has been used to deflate nominal prices into real values. The analysis shows that houses made of both stone and wood became cheaper over time. In Isoo prices, the median price of a stone house in Stockholm was 343 Swedish marks in the period 1297-1449 compared to 184 marks in the period 1550-1600. For wooden houses the same downward trend was evident: a drop from 84 marks in the first period to 52 marks in the second period. Part of the price decline is due to the fact that building plots became smaller, which suggests an increase in population in Stockholm. Declining real wages of labourers also exerted a downward pressure on the cost of building a house. The slightly negative long-term trend in real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, amounting to -0.3 and -0.1 percent per year, respectively, diverges from the strong decline in land prices in Eastern Sweden. This is an indication that the towns were less affected by the late medieval crisis than rural areas were. Plague outbreaks are shown to have affected real property prices in Stockholm, where prices fell during plague years, but quickly recovered afterwards. This pattern can be taken as an indication that real property prices were market prices that reacted to external shocks. The analysis also reports tentative results of real property prices as an indicator of economic inequality. The Gini coefficient for Stockholm varied between 0.55 in the period 1297-1449 to o.58 in the period 1450-1499. This is about the same level of inequality that has been calculated for Amsterdam in the mid-sixteenth century. The Gini coefficient for Arboga was also very similar to that of the Dutch towns taken as a whole. There is no clear trend in inequality over time in either Stockholm or Arboga. Finally, the article discusses trends in female ownership of real property by investigating if the position of women in the real property market deteriorated during the period of study. Female sellers of property amounted to nearly zo percent in Stockholm and Arboga, with no discernable time trend. Female property buyers were fewer, amounting to between three and six percent out of the total before 1500 and a somewhat higher percentage share in the sixteenth century.

  • 21.
    Franzén, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Därför hade medeltiden inga boprisrallyn2018In: Svenska Dagbladet, ISSN 1101-2412, no 6 september, p. 27-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Jakobsson, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Norm Acceptance in the International Community: A study of disaster risk reduction and climate-induced migration2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Different kinds of normative claims and statements of “oughtness” infuse the international political environment. But why do some proposed norms become accepted by the international community while others do not? This thesis investigates this central question using two normatively charged international issues as vehicles for explanation.

    One issue reflects the norm to reduce disaster risk. The other issue concerns the normative question of asylum rights for climate-induced migrants. While climate-induced migration attracted much attention in the years 2007-2008, the norm acceptance process was stymied and stalled before it had a chance to gain broad acceptance in the international community. Disaster Risk Reduction reached a different outcome. After norm entrepreneurs had a difficult time in gaining traction for the issue, the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami had an immense impact on the norm’s development, which led to the international community agreeing to the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in 2015. The norm proposition to reduce disaster risk has thus reached a broad and high level of acceptance. This thesis uses a norm theoretical lens to understand these contrasting outcomes. In doing so, it shows that there are key components missing from conventional explanations of norm success and failure. Most importantly, the lack of attention to contingencies and to windows of opportunity that contingencies may open up.

    An analytical framework is developed to account for contingent factors in norm evolution, and the relevance of these components is evaluated by using the two cases in question as plausibility probes. The framework takes the key variables from traditional approaches (agency, the norm itself and framing), adds two more recent suggestions (venue and resistance) and, most importantly, adds the component of contingencies (including windows of opportunity). The detailed empirical investigations draw on a rich, and in some parts unique, material of official texts, practitioner interviews and secondary literature. This thesis thus contributes to existing research on norms and provides future researchers with an enhanced tool for explaining norm emergence.

    The case study on disaster risk reduction provided an example of how a natural catastrophe which coincided with an already planned and prepared international summit on the subject interacted to propel disaster risk reduction to the top of the political agenda and toward norm acceptance. The case concerning international protection for climate-induced migrants showed how three particular moments in time had promising potential to advance the norm toward greater acceptance but largely failed because there were no solutions to act on, because no viable window opened to drive further attention and acceptance or because there was a “negative window”. The analysis conducted according to the framework shows how events must be actively connected to a specific norm proposition and how they must be aligned with other factors that determine the success of a norm, defined in this study as norm acceptance.

    Against this background, this study argues that contingencies, and a theorization of windows of opportunity, should always be included in explanatory tools on norm acceptance. Important explanatory aspects might otherwise be missed.

  • 23.
    Jernberg, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The legitimation of Sweden's arms exports: A content analysis of Swedish Media and Politicians framing of Sweden’s arms exports2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims at deepen our understanding of the Swedish arms exports, especially the relationship between the spoken words of politicians and actual policy outcome. The research question for the thesis is “To what extent do specific frames deployed by the media and politicians about the character of the importing state, the type of arms exported, the inter-state relationship and the economic interests lead to a legitimation crisis in an arms exporting nation which ends arms exports and military cooperation?” This thesis is especially looking at Swedish arms deals with Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Thailand. In a content analysis of the Swedish media and politicians, and by using theories of legitimation and framing, the thesis analyses how these frames can affect the legitimation of an arms deal, and explaining different policy outcomes. The analysis shows that the most common frame to use to frame a receiving country or an arms deal negatively is to frame the character of the importing state in negative terms and also connect the arms exports to the regime in the receiving country. On the other side, to defend an arms deal it is most common to frame it as an economic interest that are of national interest. Lastly, the thesis can show that the Swedish arms deal with Saudi Arabia created a legitimation crisis, which was not the case for the deals with Thailand and South Africa, and this can help us understand why the military cooperation agreement between Sweden and Saudi Arabia was ended.

  • 24.
    Jernberg, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The legitimation of Sweden's Arms exports: A content analysis of Swedish media and politicians framing of Sweden's Arms exports2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims at deepen our understanding of the Swedish arms exports, especially the relationship between the spoken words of politicians and actual policy outcome. The research question for the thesis is “To what extent do specific frames deployed by the media and politicians about the character of the importing state, the type of arms exported, the inter-state relationship and the economic interests lead to a legitimation crisis in an arms exporting nation which ends arms exports and military cooperation?”

    This thesis is especially looking at Swedish arms deals with Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Thailand. In a content analysis of the Swedish media and politicians, and by using theories of legitimation and framing, the thesis analyses how these frames can affect the legitimation of an arms deal, and explaining different policy outcomes.

    The analysis shows that the most common frame to use to frame a receiving country or an arms deal negatively is to frame the character of the importing state in negative terms and also connect the arms exports to the regime in the receiving country. On the other side, to defend an arms deal it is most common to frame it as an economic interest that are of national interest. Lastly, the thesis can show that the Swedish arms deal with Saudi Arabia created a legitimation crisis, which was not the case for the deals with Thailand and South Africa, and this can help us understand why the military cooperation agreement between Sweden and Saudi Arabia was ended.

  • 25.
    Lundgren, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bailer, Stefanie
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Târlea, Silvana
    Bargaining success in the reform of the Eurozone2019In: European Union Politics, ISSN 1465-1165, E-ISSN 1741-2757, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 65-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a systematic assessment of bargaining success in the reform of the Eurozone 2010 to 2015. Theoretically, we develop an argument about preferences and institutions as determinants of bargaining success and contrast this argument with an alternative account privileging states’ power resources. Empirically, we conduct a statistical analysis of new data covering all key reform proposals. Our findings are three-fold. First, contrary to a conventional narrative of German dominance, the negotiations produced no clear winners and losers. Second, while power resources were of limited importance, holding preferences that were centrist or close to the European Commission favored bargaining success—particularly when adoption only required the support of a qualified majority. Third, these descriptive and explanatory results reflect dynamics of compromise and reciprocity.

  • 26.
    Lundström, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Anarchist Critique of Radical Democracy: The Impossible Argument2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book addresses the conflictual nature of radical democracy. By analyzing democratic conflict in Husby, a marginalized Stockholm city district, it exposes democracy’s core division – between governors and governed – as theorized by Jacques Rancière. Tracing the genealogy of that critique, the book interrogates a historical tradition generically adverse to every form of governance, namely anarchism. By outlining the divergent and discontinuous relationship between democracy and anarchy – within the history of anarchist thought – the author adds to democratic theory ‘The Impossible Argument’: a compound anarchist critique of radical democracy.

  • 27.
    Lundström, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The Political Economy of Meat2019In: Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, ISSN 1187-7863, E-ISSN 1573-322XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses variegated scholarly approaches to what is here typified as a political economy of meat. Identified as a multifaceted, transdisciplinary and most dynamic field of research, inquiries into the political economy of meat imbricate key issues of social and economic development, across the human–animal divide. While some scholars interpret livestock production as “a pathway from poverty”, others observe deepened marginalization and exploitation. The argument raised in this paper is that concise engagement with multiple critical perspectives may facilitate further explorations into the social dynamics that characterize the political economy of meat.

  • 28.
    Malmén, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Arkiven och hierarkin: ett (företags)historiskt dilemmaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Malmén, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    "Bli den du är": att fostra en ledare i finansfamiljen2019In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Malmén, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Den opassliga hustrun: Handlingsutrymme i narrativ och praktik i företagarfamiljen2018In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 39, no 2-3, p. 27-46Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Malmén, Stina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Nordlund Edvinsson, Therese
    I familjeföretagets utkant: Om dotterns fostran i företagarhemmet 1900-19152016In: Historisk Tidskrift för Finland, ISSN 0046-7596, E-ISSN 2343-2888, no 3, p. 265-299Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Malmén, Stina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    I företagshistoriens marginaler: Familj, fostran och fortlevnad i sekelskiftets dynastier2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The dissertation addresses the question of power structures in corporate families. Two leading Swedish corporate dynasties during the pre-first world war era are examined from an intersectional perspective: the Ekman and the Wallenberg families. The Wallenberg family is still situated in the absolute top of Swedish business community, while the Ekman family has lost its position as a leading dynasty.Traditionally, research about family firms has been shaped by the understanding of a public/private dichotomy. The focus has often been on formal processes and arenas for corporate management in the “public sphere”. Another focus area in studies about family businesses is the matter of succession of leadership. This dissertation draws on critical research that has put the public/private dichotomy into question regarding the everyday operation of family businesses. In line with this research, the present study argues for a more inclusive understanding of this type of corporation, where the “private sphere” may also be considered an arena for management in the family firm. An important aspect in building and developing a dynasty is biological reproduction and the upbringing of future successors in order to secure continuity. Furthermore, this study seeks to deepen such an understanding by examining the significance of social reproduction for management and continuity in these families.Three of the articles investigate the interplay between family and business by highlighting the importance of social reproduction in order to establish successful management and continuity. Here, the role of the children and the spouse of the corporate owners proves to be of great significance. The fourth article problematizes the role of archives in knowledge production regarding family firms and argues for a greater awareness about what narratives are enabled by these archives.

  • 33.
    Myrdal, Janken
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Kvinnosaksfrågan omkring år 14302018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 63-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikeln diskuterar några bilder i en medeltida laghandskrift från 1430 och argumenterar för att dessa har en delvis annan syn på kvinnans ställning än den patriarkala som dominerade tiden

  • 34.
    Myrdal, Janken
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Lindkvist, Thomas
    World Trade in the Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries2018In: Trade and Civilisation: Economic Networks and Cultural Ties, from Prehistory to the Early Modern Era / [ed] K. Kristiansen, T Lindkvist, J Myrdal, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 515-532Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue that a dense network covered Eurasia in the fifteenth century, and that one should not just look at the major traderoutes - we also claim that Amercia was within reach for a long time before c 1500 from Europe, but the focus and interest of the West was directed eastwards

  • 35. Nugent, Neill
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Is the European Commission Really in Decline?2016In: Journal of Common Market Studies, ISSN 0021-9886, E-ISSN 1468-5965, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 1199-1215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the academic debate on the relative powers and influence of the EU institutions, it has become common to suggest - especially in the case of advocates of the 'new intergovernmentalism' - that the European Commission is in decline. In this article we show that while in some limited respects this is indeed the case, the Commission's overall position in the EU system is not one of having become a weaker institutional actor. The extent of the losses of its powers and influence tends to be exaggerated, while in some aspects its powers and influence have actually been strengthened. We show this by focusing on three of the Commission's core functions-agenda-setter, legislative actor and executive-all of which are widely portrayed as being in decline. We incorporate into our analysis both the formal and informal resources available to the Commission in exercising the functions.

  • 36. Nugent, Neill
    et al.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    The ‘political’ roles of the European Commission2019In: Journal of European Integration, ISSN 0703-6337, E-ISSN 1477-2280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent to which the European Commission exercises ‘political’ roles in European integration is very much up for debate. Some recent analyses of the Commission take it for granted that its political roles have been in decline, while others have suggested they have increased – especially under the current President of the Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, who was appointed in 2014 by a much more politicised process than had been used previously and whose College has sought to present itself as being guided by a political mission and as offering political leadership to the EU. In this article, we aim to show that in the debate about the political roles of the Commission, ‘political’ has often been poorly defined and operationalised. By drawing on Public Administration scholarship, we offer a framework for analysing how and where in the EU system the Commission’s political roles might become manifest. We then assess empirically these roles in different functions the Commission undertakes.

  • 37. Persson, Alma
    et al.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Conscripting Women: Gender, Soldiering, and Military Service in Sweden 1965–20182019In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how women, men, and gender equality in the military have been debated, made sense of, regulated, and dealt with in Swedish contemporary history. It takes its empirical point of departure in 1965, when the issue of military conscription for women was first raised in Sweden, and ends with the implementation of so called gender-neutral conscription in 2018. The study is based on a wide range of sources, collected through a combination of extensive archival work, ethnographic studies, and interviews. The analysis shows how men have been the standard against which women were measured throughout the period studied. Women service members were simultaneously perceived both as a problem and as a solution to a range of problems in the organisation. Women’s ‘different’ bodies were considered problematic, while staff shortages and demands for specific personnel qualities rendered the ‘woman soldier’ a solution, in particular in relation to international missions.

  • 38.
    Petersson, Matilda Tove
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Dellmuth, Lisa Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Merrie, Andrew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Patterns and trends in non-state actor participation in regional fisheries management organizations2019In: Marine Policy, ISSN 0308-597X, E-ISSN 1872-9460, Vol. 104, p. 146-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-state actors (NSAs) have proliferated in number and are increasingly acknowledged to matter for global governance of natural resources. This has generated considerable scholarly interest, but there is surprisingly little systematic knowledge about patterns and trends of NSA participation in global fisheries institutions. This article addresses this gap by studying NSA populations, considering more than 500 actors attending commission meetings, in the five tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (tuna RFMOs) between 2004 and 2011. It constructs a theoretical framework drawing on previous insights from population ecology and global governance literature. The articles finds that multiple NSAs participate in tuna RFMOs, but there is no general trend towards increasing proportions of NSAs compared to state participants. Representational diversity was found to be relatively limited, as NSA participants were predominately representing industry interests and from high income countries. Volatility of NSAs varied across RFMOs, but it was clear that industry representatives were frequently repeat participants, while civil society organizations (CSOs) participated only in occasional meetings. Finally, industry representatives were found to participate as part of member state delegations, while CSOs generally participated as observers. The article discusses the implications of the variation in NSA populations across RFMOs, and over time, and in relation to important concerns in the broader scholarly debates on access, influence, representation, and effectiveness in global environmental governance.

  • 39.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Public Policy Approaches and the Study of European Union Justice and Home Affairs2018In: The Routledge Handbook of Justice and Home Affairs Research / [ed] Ariadna Ripoll-Servent, Florian Trauner, London: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public policy approaches to studying justice and home affairs (JHA) cooperation in the European Union (EU) have proliferated of late, and it is no wonder why. This chapter reviews the public policy approach to studying JHA cooperation in the EU and illustrates the kinds of research taking place in line with that approach. To provide an accessible overview of the public policy approach and to present representative studies in that vein, the chapter explains how such approaches found their way into EU studies as the broader context within which JHA studies is situated. It also reviews the approach and its traditional emphasis on three sets of factors shaping policy outcomes: actors, institutions and ideas. The chapter illustrates what those factors mean and how they are studied in practice, before offering some cross-cutting concepts that help bring together the study of actors, institutions and ideas in EU policy-making to enhance explanation.

  • 40.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    Resilience: a false promise for the EU’s Global Strategy2017In: After the EU Global Strategy: building resilience / [ed] Florence Gaub, Nico Popescu, Paris: European Union Institute for Security Studies , 2017, p. 25-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Strategic Framing and the European Commission2018In: The Routledge Handbook of European Public Policy / [ed] Nikolaos Zahariadis, Laurie Buonanno, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Rhinard, Mark
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations. Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Sweden.
    The Crisisification of Policy‐making in the European Union2019In: Journal of Common Market Studies, ISSN 0021-9886, E-ISSN 1468-5965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years a subtle change has taken place in the policy‐making machinery shaping European integration. The traditional methods for producing collective European Union (EU) policies, typified by the extensive analysis of a problem, extended phases of consultation with stakeholders, the deliberate cultivation of support for proposals, occasional decision‐making moments and their long‐term implementation, now share space with what is best described as crisis‐oriented methods for arriving at collective decisions. These methods prioritize the early identification of the next crisis, specific kinds of actors and technologies, abbreviated decision‐making procedures and new narratives on the raison d'etre of European integration. This article treats this development as a kind of crisisification of EU policy‐making – a change in the processes by which collective decisions are made – and explores its implications for practice and research by drawing on both classical EU studies approaches and insights from critical security studies.

  • 43.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Den allmänna rösträtten – när infördes den?2018In: Demokrati100.se, E-ISSN 2003-1564Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Money, Gender and Military Training: Women as Economic Agents in Military Affairs (Sweden 1924–1942)2018In: Militärhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0283-8400, p. 60-89Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    En man, en röst, ett gevär2019In: Könspolitiska nyckeltexter: Från Det går an till #metoo / [ed] Klara Arnberg, Fia Sundevall, David Tjeder, Makadam Förlag, 2019, 2Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Svanberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Mellan facklig internationalism och nationalism: Internationella Metallarbetarfederationen i kalla krigets och Europaintegrationens gryning2018In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 138, no 3, p. 421-451Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Svanberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Mellan nationella intressen och internationella ambitioner: Recension av Talbot C. Imlay, The Practice of Socialist Internationalism. European Socialists and International Politics, 1914-1960, Oxford 2018, 480 sid.2018In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, Vol. 167-168, no 3-4, p. 82-86Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 48. Söderqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Att tillgängliggöra forskning?2018In: Arbetarhistoria : Meddelande från Arbetarrörelsens Arkiv och Bibliotek, ISSN 0281-7446, no 1-2, p. 4-5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 49. Târlea, Silvana
    et al.
    Bailer, Stefanie
    Degner, Hanno
    Dellmuth, Lisa M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Leuffen, Dirk
    Lundgren, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tallberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Wasserfallen, Fabio
    Explaining governmental preferences on Economic and Monetary Union Reform2019In: European Union Politics, ISSN 1465-1165, E-ISSN 1741-2757, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 24-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the extent to which economic or political factors shaped government preferences in the reform of the Economic Monetary Union. A multilevel analysis of European Union member governments’ preferences on 40 EMU reform issues negotiated between 2010 and 2015 suggests that countries’ financial sector exposure has significant explanatory power. Seeking to minimize the risk of costly bailouts, countries with highly exposed financial sectors were more likely to support solutions involving high degrees of European integration. In contrast, political factors had no systematic impact. These findings help to enhance our understanding of preference formation in the European Union and the viability of future EMU reform.

  • 50.
    Viktorov, Ilja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Insider trading (USA/general)2018In: The Global Encyclopaedia of Informality, Volume 2: Understanding Social and Cultural Complexity / [ed] Alena Ledeneva, London: UCL Press, 2018, p. 233-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The entry provides a brief introduction into insider trading as an informal practice in stock markets, with emphasis on the US historical experience. Examples from Russia and Nigeria as emerging markets are also provided.

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