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  • 1. Lewandowski, Jörg
    et al.
    Arnon, Shai
    Banks, Eddie
    Batelaan, Okke
    Betterle, Andrea
    Broecker, Tabea
    Coll, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Drummond, Jennifer D.
    Garcia, Jaime Gaona
    Galloway, Jason
    Gomez-Velez, Jesus
    Grabowski, Robert C.
    Herzog, Skuyler P.
    Hinkelmann, Reinhard
    Höhne, Anja
    Hollender, Juliane
    Horn, Marcus A.
    Jaeger, Anna
    Krause, Stefan
    Löchner Prats, Adrian
    Magliozzi, Chiara
    Meinikmann, Karin
    Mojarrad, Brian Babak
    Mueller, Birgit Maria
    Peralta-Maraver, Ignacio
    Popp, Andrea L.
    Posselt, Malte
    Putschew, Anke
    Radke, Michael
    Raza, Muhammad
    Riml, Joakim
    Robertson, Anne
    Rutere, Cyrus
    Schaper, Jonas L.
    Schirmer, Mario
    Schulz, Hanna
    Shanafield, Margaret
    Singh, Tanu
    Ward, Adam S.
    Wolke, Philipp
    Wörman, Anders
    Wu, Liwen
    Is the Hyporheic Zone Relevant beyond the Scientific Community?2019In: Water, ISSN 2073-4441, E-ISSN 2073-4441, Vol. 11, no 11, article id 2230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Rivers are important ecosystems under continuous anthropogenic stresses. The hyporheic zone is a ubiquitous, reactive interface between the main channel and its surrounding sediments along the river network. We elaborate on the main physical, biological, and biogeochemical drivers and processes within the hyporheic zone that have been studied by multiple scientific disciplines for almost half a century. These previous efforts have shown that the hyporheic zone is a modulator for most metabolic stream processes and serves as a refuge and habitat for a diverse range of aquatic organisms. It also exerts a major control on river water quality by increasing the contact time with reactive environments, which in turn results in retention and transformation of nutrients, trace organic compounds, fine suspended particles, and microplastics, among others. The paper showcases the critical importance of hyporheic zones, both from a scientific and an applied perspective, and their role in ecosystem services to answer the question of the manuscript title. It identifies major research gaps in our understanding of hyporheic processes. In conclusion, we highlight the potential of hyporheic restoration to efficiently manage and reactivate ecosystem functions and services in river corridors.

  • 2. Schaper, Jonas L.
    et al.
    Posselt, Malte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bouchez, Camille
    Jaeger, Anna
    Nuetzmann, Gunnar
    Putschew, Anke
    Singer, Gabriel
    Lewandowski, Joerg
    Fate of Trace Organic Compounds in the Hyporheic Zone: Influence of Retardation, the Benthic Biolayer, and Organic Carbon2019In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 4224-4234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fate of 28 trace organic compounds (TrOCs) was investigated in the hyporheic zone (HZ) of an urban lowland river in Berlin, Germany. Water samples were collected hourly over 17 h in the river and in three depths in the HZ using minipoint samplers. The four relatively variable time series were subsequently used to calculate first order removal rates and retardation coefficients via a one-dimensional reactive transport model. Reversible sorption processes led to substantial retardation of many TrOCs along the investigated hyporheic flow path. Some TrOCs, such as dihydroxy-carbamazepine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and venlafaxine, were found to be stable in the HZ. Others were readily removed with half-lives in the first 10 cm of the HZ ranging from 0.1 +/- 0.01 h for iopromide to 3.3 +/- 0.3 h for tramadol. Removal rate constants of the majority of reactive TrOCs were highest in the first 10 cm of the HZ, where removal of biodegradable dissolved organic matter was also the highest. Because conditions were oxic along the top 30 cm of the investigated flow path, we attribute this finding to the high microbial activity typically associated with the shallow HZ. Frequent and short vertical hyporheic exchange flows could therefore be more important for reach-scale TrOC removal than long, lateral hyporheic flow paths.

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