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  • 1. Mooij, Wolf M.
    et al.
    van Wijk, Dianneke
    Beusen, Arthur H. W.
    Brederveld, Robert J.
    Chang, Manqi
    Cobben, Marleen M. P.
    DeAngelis, Don L.
    Downing, Andrea S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Green, Pamela
    Gsell, Alena S.
    Huttunen, Inese
    Janse, Jan H.
    Janssen, Annette B. G.
    Hengeveld, Geerten M.
    Kong, Xiangzhen
    Kramer, Lilith
    Kuiper, Jan J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Stanford University, USA.
    Langan, Simon J.
    Nolet, Bart A.
    Nuijten, Rascha J. M.
    Strokal, Maryna
    Troost, Tineke A.
    van Dam, Anne A.
    Teurlincx, Sven
    Modeling water quality in the Anthropocene: directions for the next-generation aquatic ecosystem models2019In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 36, p. 85-95Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Everything changes and nothing stands still (Heraclitus). Here we review three major improvements to freshwater aquatic ecosystem models - and ecological models in general - as water quality scenario analysis tools towards a sustainable future. To tackle the rapid and deeply connected dynamics characteristic of the Anthropocene, we argue for the inclusion of eco-evolutionary, novel ecosystem and social-ecological dynamics. These dynamics arise from adaptive responses in organisms and ecosystems to global environmental change and act at different integration levels and different time scales. We provide reasons and means to incorporate each improvement into aquatic ecosystem models. Throughout this study we refer to Lake Victoria as a microcosm of the evolving novel social-ecological systems of the Anthropocene. The Lake Victoria case clearly shows how interlinked eco-evolutionary, novel ecosystem and social-ecological dynamics are, and demonstrates the need for transdisciplinary research approaches towards global sustainability.

  • 2. Teurlincx, Sven
    et al.
    Kuiper, Jan J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hoevenaar, Ellen C. M.
    Lurling, Miquel
    Brederveld, Robert J.
    Veraart, Annelies J.
    Janssen, Annette B. G.
    Mooij, Wolf M.
    Domis, Lisette N. de Senerpont
    Towards restoring urban waters: understanding the main pressures2019In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 36, p. 49-58Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water bodies in the urban landscape are omnipresent, with many being small, lentic waters such as ponds and lakes. Because of high anthropogenic forcing, these systems have poor water quality, with large consequences for the provisioning of ecosystem services. Understanding of the main pressures on urban water quality is key to successful management. We identify six pressures that we hypothesize to have strong links to anthropogenic forcing including: eutrophication, aquatic invasive species, altered hydrology, altered habitat structure, climate change, and micropollutants. We discuss how these pressures may affect water quality and ecological functioning of urban waters. We describe how these pressures may interact, posing challengers for water management. We identify steps that need to be taken towards sustainable restoration, recognizing the challenges that potentially interacting pressures pose to water managers.

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