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  • 1. Birdsall, Carolyn
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Capturing commemoration: Using mobile recordings within memory research.2018In: Mobile Media & Communication, ISSN 2050-1579, E-ISSN 2050-1587, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 266-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper details the contribution of mobile devices to capturing commemoration in action. It investigates the incorporation of audio and sound recording devices, observation, and note-taking into a mobile (auto)ethnographic research methodology, to research a large-scale commemorative event in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. On May 4, 2016, the sounds of a Silent March-through the streets of Amsterdam to Dam Square-were recorded and complemented by video grabs of the march's participants and onlookers. We discuss how the mixed method enabled a multilevel analysis across visual, textual, and aural layers of the commemorative atmosphere. Our visual data aided in our evaluation of the construction of collective spectacle, while the audio data necessitated that we venture into new analytic territory. Using Sonic Visualiser, we uncovered alternative methods of "reading" landscape by identifying different sound signatures in the acoustic environment. Together, this aural and visual representation of the May 4 events enabled the identification of spatial markers and the temporal unfolding of the Silent March and the national 2 minutes' silence in Amsterdam's Dam Square.

  • 2. Bradstreet, Anthony J
    et al.
    Brander, Robert W
    McCarroll, Jak R
    Brighton, Barbara
    Howes, Dale Dominey
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Sherker, Shauna
    Turner, Ian
    Roberts, Amelia
    MacMahan, Jamie
    Rip current survival principles: towards consistency2014In: Journal of Coastal Research, ISSN 0749-0208, E-ISSN 1551-5036, Vol. 72, no sp1, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Brander, Robert W
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Dominey-Howes, Dale
    “Dye in the Water” A Visual Approach to Communicating the Rip Current Hazard2014In: Science communication, ISSN 1075-5470, E-ISSN 1552-8545, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 802-810Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Broadbent, Gail Helen
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Metternicht, Graciela
    Electric vehicle adoption: An analysis of best practice and pitfalls for policy making from experiences of Europe and the US2018In: Geography Compass, ISSN 1749-8198, E-ISSN 1749-8198, Vol. 12, no 2, p. e12358-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Broadbent, Gail Helen
    et al.
    Metternicht, Graciela
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    An Analysis of Consumer Incentives in Support of Electric Vehicle Uptake: An Australian Case Study2019In: World Electric Vehicle Journal, ISSN 2032-6653, E-ISSN 2032-6653, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transitioning from internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs) to innovative technologies, including electric vehicles (EVs), can be a crucial pathway to reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and other negative externalities arising from fossil-fueled cars used for personal transport. Government action to correct insufficient market incentives has been essential in countries working to enhance EV acceptance; however, to date in Australia, there has been little government support to enact EV uptake. This paper identifies barriers and incentives to EV adoption in Australia through a survey of pro-environmental motorists, including an experimental component to test information provision influences on attitude change. Results evidence that wide ranging factors influence vehicle choice including EVs. Purchase barriers are focused on lack of a comprehensive recharge network and high EV purchase price. Factors encouraging fully EV uptake showed affordable price (56%) increased vehicle range (26%) and an adequate recharge network (28%) were mentioned most often; only 13% specifically indicated environmental regard as influential. Information provided about EVs increased the likelihood of positive attitudes towards EV purchase and decreased uncertainty about the technology. Recommendations arising from this research could be considered by laggard countries that, like Australia, have yet to take significant action to encourage transition to EVs.

  • 6. Buckle, Caitlin
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales, Australia.
    Urban perceptions of tree-change migration2018In: Rural Society, ISSN 1037-1656, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 192-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses urban residents’ familiarisation and conceptualisation of the Australian ex-urban migration trend “tree-change”. Urban residents from Sydney, Australia were surveyed and asked whether they were familiar with the term tree-change and to nominate imagery and locations considered to reflect a tree-change move. Many survey respondents were not familiar with the term tree-change, but had little difficulty understanding the concept after brief prompting. Tree-change was linked with the visuality of the rural idyll through selecting imagery such as green vistas and heritage facades. Places nominated by survey respondents as tree-change locations were mostly proximal to Sydney, or large regional centres . These findings suggest that representations of tree-change are being received by urban residents, but urban residents’ familiarity with rural and regional Australia is low. This article highlights the place-specific nature of ex-urban and lifestyle migration, suggesting a “one size fits all” theoretical approach is ineffective.

  • 7. Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Jokinen, Johanna Carolina
    Falconer, Emily
    “Who can play this game?” The lived experiences of doctoral candidates and early career women in the neoliberal university2018In: Journal of geography in higher education (Print), ISSN 0309-8265, E-ISSN 1466-1845, Vol. EarlyView, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. De Nardi, Sarah
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Landscape and memory2019In: The Routledge Companion to Landscape Studies / [ed] Peter Howard, Ian H Thompson, Emma Waterton, Mick Atha, London: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    A place called ‘Bielany’: Negotiating a diasporic Polish place in Sydney2007In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 853-869Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Does Anzac Sit Comfortably within Australia's Multiculturalism?2016In: Australian Geographer, ISSN 0004-9182, E-ISSN 1465-3311, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 3-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Encountering memory in the everyday city2016In: Memory, Place and Identity: Commemoration and Remembrance of War and Conflict, Abingdon: Routledge , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Festival places: revitalising rural Australia2011In: Australian Geographer, ISSN 0004-9182, E-ISSN 1465-3311, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 455-457Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Knowing (or Not) about Katyń: The Silencing and Surfacing of Public Memory2012In: Space & Polity, ISSN 1356-2576, E-ISSN 1470-1235, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract For Poles, the Katy? Forest, in Russia, is a place immediately associated with national suffering. Katy? is one of three sites where approximately 20 000 Poles were executed during World War II, by the Soviet secret service. To shore up wartime political dependencies, knowledge of Katy? was silenced by the dominant hegemony. The public absence of Katy? narratives compelled their safeguarding and presence (where possible) in private spheres of the home. In 2010, the death of 96 people at Katy??en route to commemorate the massacre?etched a new scar on an existing wound. The shifting of Katy? narratives between public absence and private presence exemplifies the importance of power in silencing public memory narratives. For Poles, the Katy? Forest, in Russia, is a place immediately associated with national suffering. Katy? is one of three sites where approximately 20 000 Poles were executed during World War II, by the Soviet secret service. To shore up wartime political dependencies, knowledge of Katy? was silenced by the dominant hegemony. The public absence of Katy? narratives compelled their safeguarding and presence (where possible) in private spheres of the home. In 2010, the death of 96 people at Katy??en route to commemorate the massacre?etched a new scar on an existing wound. The shifting of Katy? narratives between public absence and private presence exemplifies the importance of power in silencing public memory narratives.

  • 14.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Knowing (or not) about Katyń: the silencing and surfacing of public memory2015In: The politics of hiding, invisibility, and silence: between absence and presence, London: Routledge , 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Language tourism in Poland2011In: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 165-186Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    ‘Less-than-fluent’ and culturally connected: language learning and cultural fluency as research methodology2018In: Area (London 1969), ISSN 0004-0894, E-ISSN 1475-4762, p. n/a-n/aArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to critically explore language learning and cultural fluency as a research methodology. Deploying an auto-ethnographic approach, I scrutinise my programme of language learning and forays into the cultural to highlight how knowledge of the cultural contexts of a language, and not just the language itself, have provided nuanced insights into Polish cultural memory and identity. The paper's specific contribution is to agitate for a greater recognition of the value of cultural understanding and language learning as a distinct methodological approach. I track how the process of learning the Polish language and its cultural intricacies has included both acts of speaking and comprehending how words are (re)presented in their cultural contexts.

  • 17.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Locating the geopolitics of memory in the Polish streetscape2017In: The Political Life of Urban Streetscapes: Naming, Politics, and Place, Abingdon: Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. UNSW Sydney, Australia .
    Memory, Movement, Mobility: Affect-full Encounters with Memory in Singapore2018In: Media Theory, ISSN 2557-826X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 245-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory, movement and mobility characterise our everyday being. Our bodies are in constant processes of motion: our body remembers movement. Memory of movement, of and in the body, is key to our capacity to move, even if we are not aware that we are remembering movement. Mobility with, from, and in the body is (re)produced and performed by a repertoire of movements, orchestrated (for the most part) synchronously. While studies of mobility have received much recent scholarly attention, the interlinkages between memory, movement and mobility have received far less attention (see Anderson, 2004 and Casey, 2000 for notable exceptions). In redressing this omission, this paper delves into the relationship between memory, movement and mobility by directing its lens on two themes: body memory, that is memory of and in the body felt through movement, and movement and mobility, that is how mobility influences our capacities to remember, what we remember while mobile, and how specific sites of memory are designed with mobility in mind.

    I consider intersections of mobility and memory in the context of empirical work undertaken at sites of Singaporean World War II commemoration. I used my body as a tool for this research; I felt and read memory at the memorial sites. I also used movement through the sites. Being mobile prompted consideration of how movement, spontaneous and along designed pathways, at/through/with these memory sites, influenced memory, its (re)production, transmission and/or performance.

  • 19.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Retrospective reflexivity: The residual and subliminal repercussions of researching war2015In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, no 0Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stories of the war have been a known part of my story as granddaughter of Polish post-war migrants. Yet venturing into these stories as researcher has been troubling; I found their closeness and their raw emotion difficult to process. Significant sections of my interview schedules entailed participants recounting their own, their parents' or their grandparents' stories of war and migration, with traumatic episodes frequently intersecting into their stories. As a researcher, these traumatic narratives have had a residual quality, lasting in my subconscious long after the interviews themselves and doctorate for which they were conducted had finished. In this paper, I focus on experiences of, and reactions to listening to, analysing and writing about these traumatic cultural memories. Collins (1998: 3.35) has observed that ‘the emotions experienced, whether by the interviewer or interviewee, are as real, as important and as interesting as any other product of the interview’; my powerfully felt experiences with traumatic content have validated this sentiment. With a retrospective reflexivity I now realise that these cultural memories were not the only ‘product’ of my research, but that how they were narrated and how I dealt with them were also a significant part of the research process, and indeed stories in themselves. Here I attempt to retell how these stories impacted me as the researcher; how in the case of particularly harrowing stories, I also needed time to absorb the narratives, to comprehend the participant's experiences and their ability to narrate such stories, and to recover from the experience of listening to such accounts.

  • 20.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Stolpersteine and memory in the streetscap2018In: After Heritage: Critical Perspectives on Heritage from Below / [ed] Hamzah Muzaini, Claudio Minca, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    ‘They have no concept of what a farm is’: Exploring Rural Change through Tree Change Migration2014In: Rural change in Australia: Population, economy, environment, London: Ashgate Publishing Ltd , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Using history in the streetscape to affirm geopolitics of memory2014In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 42, no 0, p. 66-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Polish city of Kraków, successive regimes have (re)named the streetscape to advance their influence and ideologies. This paper examines changes in street names under three different governmental powers – Nazi, Soviet and Polish – on five maps of the city centre (from 1934, 1943, 1964, 1985 and 1996). The work extends the current literature on toponymy by providing a temporal analysis of the street name changes to one bounded area over time, which demonstrates how a politics of memory is inculcated into streetscapes to reaffirm political control. By reference to one space, I show how the name changes proffer an intriguing insight into how two foreign regimes viewed their occupations and, in addition, how all three sought to strengthen their influence by using names that reinforced past examples of their power and alleged cultural superiority in the landscape.

  • 23.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Waves of migration inclusion and exclusion: The experiences of Polish Australians2011In: Migration, citizenship intercultural relations: Looking through the lens of social inclusion, Britain: Ashgate , 2011Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    ‘We’re moving out’: Youth Out‐Migration Intentions in Coastal Non‐Metropolitan New South Wales2008In: Geographical Research, ISSN 1745-5863, E-ISSN 1745-5871, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    When the Everyday and the Sacred Collide: Positioning Płaszów in the Kraków Landscape2014In: Landscape research, ISSN 0142-6397, E-ISSN 1469-9710, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 255-266Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract In Kraków, Poland, the sacredness of the former P?aszów concentration camp is positioned within the everyday and urban landscape. The grievous history of the site contrasts the urbanity of the busy thoroughfare along one of the site's perimeters, where commercial developments are increasing in number and size. The site's open green spaces and the paucity of formal and material monuments place it outside the ambit of more common public portrayals of collective cultural memories. In this short commentary, I unpack the positioning of memory within the everyday landscape by means of landscape reading and visual methodologies. I critically consider the challenges of representing memory in everyday settings by (de)constructing P?aszów's memory layers. Culminating around the question of how to maintain the site's sacristy amid an increasingly distractive urban landscape, these challenges position memories of the past alongside the stronger attachments we may have with places associated with our daily routines. In Kraków, Poland, the sacredness of the former P?aszów concentration camp is positioned within the everyday and urban landscape. The grievous history of the site contrasts the urbanity of the busy thoroughfare along one of the site's perimeters, where commercial developments are increasing in number and size. The site's open green spaces and the paucity of formal and material monuments place it outside the ambit of more common public portrayals of collective cultural memories. In this short commentary, I unpack the positioning of memory within the everyday landscape by means of landscape reading and visual methodologies. I critically consider the challenges of representing memory in everyday settings by (de)constructing P?aszów's memory layers. Culminating around the question of how to maintain the site's sacristy amid an increasingly distractive urban landscape, these challenges position memories of the past alongside the stronger attachments we may have with places associated with our daily routines.

  • 26.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Birdsall, Carolyn
    Advancing Memory Methods2019In: Doing Memory Research: New Methods and Approaches / [ed] Danielle Drozdzewski, Carolyn Birdsall, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This introductory chapter provides an extended reflection on the scope of memory methods, charting the existing methods-based research, and how an affective turn in the humanities and social sciences has prompted scholars in memory studies to engage with more-than-human and embodied methodological approaches. The introduction also outlines the themes covered by the volume: an ethics of care, experiencing and emplaced (researcher) bodies, and places—mapped and digital. We summarise the contributions, explicating how they push traditional methodological boundaries in their engagement with multisensorial and embodied memory-work, and use memory places through mapping and digital media.

  • 27.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Birdsall, Carolyn
    Doing Memory Research: New Methods and Approached2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Memory studies is a nascent and multidisciplinary research field, drawing from an impressive array of qualitative investigative methods deployed to do memory research. The authors in this collection offer an explicit engagement with the ‘doing’ of memory research. The contributions demonstrate how attention to methodology reveals rich insights about memory and its links to place and identity.

  • 28.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Birdsall, Carolyn
    Using Emplaced Ethnography, Mobility, and Listening to Research Memory2019In: Doing Memory Research: New Methods and Approaches / [ed] Danielle Drozdzewski, Carolyn Birdsall, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, p. 39-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores two examples of collective national remembrance that occur in the Netherlands on 4 and 5 May annually. A visual and sound-based ethnography was used to better understand the relationship between the practice of commemoration and its affect (Anderson 2004). On 4 May, the sounds of a silence march—through the streets of Amsterdam to the Dam Square—were recorded and complimented by video grabs of the march’s participants and onlookers. On 5 May, sounds and atmospheres (cf. Sumartojo 2015) were recorded at one of Holland’s biggest ‘freedom festivals’, named Bevrijdingspop, in Haarlem. We highlight how by paying more attention to the sounds (and images) rather than solely to text, we better understood the role they played in the co-constitution of commemorative spaces.

  • 29.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    De Nardi, SarahWaterton, Emma
    Memory, Place and Identity: Commemoration and remembrance of war and conflict2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    De Nardi, Sarah
    Waterton, Emma
    The significance of memory in the present2016In: Memory, Place Identity: Commemoration Remembrance of War Conflict, Abingdon: Routledge , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Dominey-Howes, Dale
    Research and trauma: Understanding the impact of traumatic content and places on the researcher2015In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 17, p. 17-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Nardi, Sarah De
    Waterton, Emma
    Geographies of memory, place and identity: Intersections in remembering war and conflict2016In: Geography Compass, ISSN 1749-8198, E-ISSN 1749-8198, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 447-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The terms memory, place and identity exemplify the core concerns of geographical inquiry – focusing on linkages between people, place, and culture. In this review, we hone in on the intersections between these three terms in the context of the remembrance of war and conflict. We seek to highlight how memory informs the construction and maintenance of identities (personal, national, and supranational) post-conflict and post-war, and how these identities are drawn upon and articulated through place. In doing so, we also explore how investigations of and in memory benefit from methodologies that engage with more-than-human and more-than-representational approaches. We take this stance because memory is a powerful force invoking experience, emotion, and an awakening of the senses. Its affective capacity moves beyond stoic representations of memory in stone and marble, for example; it can be smelt, touched, felt, imagined, tasted, and heard. Any one of these sensations has the agency to transport us not only to different times but to different places. With this in mind, we use this review to investigate how memory (re)produces and maintains the identity of places, communities, and nations. Understanding the links between memory, identity, and place also leads to a concomitant process of comprehending the influence of a politics of memory in the (re)production of both places and identities.

  • 33.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Roberts, Amelia
    Dominey-Howes, Dale
    Brander, Robert
    The Experiences of Weak and Non-Swimmers Caught in Rip Currents at Australian Beaches2015In: Australian Geographer, ISSN 0004-9182, E-ISSN 1465-3311, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 15-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACTBeach rip currents present a risk to weak and non-swimmers, whose limited open water swim competencies may render them incapable of swimming out of these common and strong offshore flows. Here, the aim has been to explore this group's vulnerability by identifying how the limits of their swimming competencies influence their abilities to successfully execute a rip current exit strategy. It provides empirical detail on their knowledge of rip currents, their behavioural responses when caught in the rip current, the advice they recalled and the educational messages they recommend to other swimmers. A secondary aim has been to begin a dialogue that recognises the capacity of the Australian beach cultures?as places of relaxation and natural beauty?to influence people's decisions to enter the water. This cultural contextualisation may help explain why some self-identified weak and non-swimmers still enter the water despite their limited competencies. Through a synthesis of survey and interview data, we argue that weak and non-swimmers need to take the threat of rip currents seriously. Pre-emptive safety advice should be sought, especially if people intend to swim regardless of their swimming ability.

  • 34.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Robinson, Daniel F.
    Care-work on fieldwork: taking your own children into the field2015In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Shaw, W
    Dominey-Howes, Dale
    Brander, R
    Walton, T
    Gero, A
    Sherker, S
    Goff, J
    Edwick, B
    Surveying rip current survivors: preliminary insights into the experiences of being caught in rip currents2012In: Natural hazards and earth system sciences, ISSN 1561-8633, E-ISSN 1684-9981, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1201-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Shaw, W
    Godfrey, N
    Treechange migration to the NSW southern highlands: motivations and outcomes of urban to rural migration2011Other (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Waterton, Emma
    In remembering Anzac Day, what do we forget?2016Other (Refereed)
  • 38. Klocker, Natascha
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Commentary: Career progress relative to opportunity2012In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 44, no 6, p. 1271-1277Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39. Klocker, Natascha
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Survival and subversion in the neoliberal university2012Other (Refereed)
  • 40. Norquay, Melinda
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Stereotyping the Shire: Assigning White Privilege to Place and Identity2017In: Journal of Intercultural Studies, ISSN 0725-6868, E-ISSN 1469-9540, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 88-107Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41. Ratnam, Charishma
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Assembling attachments to homes under bushfire risk2018In: Geographical Research, ISSN 1745-5863, E-ISSN 1745-5871, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 42-53Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42. Ratnam, Charishma
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Chapple, Rosalie
    Can place attachment mediate perceptions bushfire risk?: A case study of the Blue Mountains, NSW2016In: Australian Journal of Emergency Management, The, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 62-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43. Robinson, Daniel F
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Hybrid identities: juxtaposing multiple identities against the ‘authentic’ Moken2015In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Moken and Moklen are an indigenous population residing along the Andaman coast of Thailand. They have been represented, both in popular and academic discourse, as seafaring nomads living in traditional boats and small temporal coastal communities. The overwhelmingly precept of the existing literature about the Moken is one of vulnerability and of stemming the erosion of ?authentic? Moken cultural identities. Identification of Moken as being under threat transpired as a consequence of the 2004 Asian tsunami, in which many Moken were killed and the plight of others who had their houses and sources of livelihood destroyed was propelled onto an international stage. This paper critically discusses how Moken identities and associated discourses of vulnerability have been depicted in media and academic literature as fixed and traditional. We argue that such rigid identity narratives contrast sharply to the contemporary realities of the Moken identities as articulated by the Moken we interviewed.

  • 44. Robinson, Daniel F
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Kiddell, Louise
    “You Can’t Change our Ancestors Without our Permission”: Cultural Perspectives on Biopiracy2014In: Piracy: Leakages from Modernity, Litwin Books , 2014Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 45. Sumartojo, Shanti
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Graves, Matthew
    Kesteloot, Chantal
    Vanneste, Dominique
    Vanraepenbusch, Karla
    Van Ypersele, Laurence
    Wallis, James
    Winter, Caroline
    Wouters, Nico
    Commemoration reframed: conceptualising commemoration from the perspective of experience2017Report (Refereed)
  • 46. Wolifson, Peta
    et al.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    Co-opting the night: the entrepreneurial shift and economic imperative in NTE planning2017In: Urban Policy and Research, ISSN 0811-1146, E-ISSN 1476-7244, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 486-504Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 46 of 46
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