Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Eneroth, Mari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
    Gustafsson, Karin Schenck
    Wall, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Threats or violence from patients was associated with turnover intention among foreign-born GPs - a comparison of four workplace factors associated with attitudes of wanting to quit one's job as a GP2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 208-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: General practitioners (GPs) are crucial in medical healthcare, but there is currently a shortage of GPs in Sweden and elsewhere. Recruitment of GPs from abroad is essential, but foreign-born physicians face difficulties at work that may be related to turnover intention, i.e. wanting to quit one's job. The study aims to explore the reasons to why foreign-born GPs may intend to quit their job. Design: Survey data were used to compare four work-related factors that can be associated with turnover intentions; patient-related stress, threats or violence from patients, control of work pace, and empowering leadership, among native-born and foreign-born GPs. These work-related factors were subsequently examined in relation to turnover intention among the foreign-born GPs by means of linear hierarchical regression analyses. The questionnaire consisted of items from the QPS Nordic and items constructed by the authors. Setting: A primary care setting in a central area of Sweden. Subjects: Native-born (n = 208) and foreign-born GPs (n = 73). Results: Turnover intention was more common among foreign-born GPs (19.2% compared with 14.9%), as was the experience of threats or violence from patients (22% compared with 3% of the native-born GPs). Threats or violence was also associated with increased turnover intention. Control of work pace and an empowering leadership was associated with reduced turnover intention.

  • 2.
    Eneroth, Mari
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wall, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Reasons to quit among Swedish General Practitioners2014In: International Conference on Physician Health: Milestones and transitions  - Maintaining the balance: Abstract brochure, 2014, p. 2-2Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: General practitioners play a crucial part in healthcare as they provide the continuity of care that can prevent illness, and they most often represent the patients first contact with health-care. A current problem is however that there is a lack of general practitioners in several countries. Recruitment of general practitioners from abroad is essential to ensure the publics physician access, but there are indications that this group has even greater quitting intentions than native-born physicians. The antecedents of turnover intentions may moreover differ in importance for native-born and foreign-born physicians respectively. Methods and participants: The authors examined five fundamental physician work factors in relation to intention to quit among native-born general practitioners (n=208), and foreign-born general practitioners (n=73) working in a primary care setting in a central area in Sweden. Linear regression analysis was performed with control for age and gender. The sample consisted of 64 % females. Results: Foreign-born general practitioners more often stated that they would quit today if they could than native-born practitioners (t278= 3,73, p = .001). Regression analysis revealed that pressure from patients was related to an increased intention to quit in both groups. In addition, vacancies and pressure from financial goals were related to a higher risk of wanting to quit among native-born general practitioners. HR-Primacy was associated with a decreased risk of turnover intentions among the native-born general practitioners, while control of work pace was highly related to a decreased risk of turnover intentions among foreign-born general practitioners. Conclusions: General practitioners primarily experience pressure from patients and financial goals of the care-unit, which may provoke intentions to quit. Study suggestions are that care-unit financial goals are set in consent with physicians, and that control of work pace is encouraged.

  • 3.
    Fridner, Ann
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Cognitive psychology.
    Wall, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Why do General Practitioners Self-Diagnose and Self-Prescribe Drugs?2016In: Book of Proceedings: 12th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: OHP in Times of Change: Society and the workplace / [ed] Kevin Teoh, Vlad Dediu, Nathalie Jean Saade, Juliet Hassard, Nottingham, UK: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology, 2016, p. 203-203Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Physicians tend to demonstrate inappropriate behavior when it comes to taking care of their own health. Self-prescribing or self-treatment seems to be practiced in many countries, and self-treated illnesses are found to be more common among general practitioners. For the physician such behavior is a threat to their own health, and as a consequence their patients might not be able to receive optimal health care. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between help seeking behavior, sickness presenteeism, exhaustion, and self- treatment among general practitioners.

    Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among GPs employed in one City Council in Sweden using a questionnaire on health and work factors. The criterion variable “To self-diagnose and self-treat” was measured with a single item from the Physician Career Path Questionnaire (PCPQ; Fridner, 2004). Exhaustion was measured with a scale from the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory, OLBI (α = .82; Demerouti et al., 2001, 2003). “Sickness presenteeism” and “Taking vacation due to stress” was measured with single items, also from the PCPQ (Fridner, 2004). For the analyses, we used hierarchical multiple regression.

    Results: Altogether 193 (63,9%) female GPs and 109 (36,1%) male GPs answered the questionnaire, a 44% response-rate. Among them 46,2% stated they had diagnosed and treated themselves for a condition for which they would have referred a patient to a specialist. Our regression analysis model revealed that those physicians who self-treated themselves were also significantly more sickness present at work. Adding to this, exhaustion among the GPs was also included in the model.

    Conclusions: This study shows that self-treatment is not an isolated behavior, but occurs together with exhaustion and sickness presenteeism, indicating a quite severe situation for their health, which would need to be investigated by other doctors than themselves. This needs to be further investigated and taken into account by the National Board of Health and Welfare, County Councils and Medical Associations, and for future physicians our medical schools. 

  • 4.
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eneroth, Mari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wall, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gender influence on sickness presence in outpatient care2014In: International Conference on Physician Health: Milestones and transitions  - Maintaining the balance: Abstract brochure, 2014, p. 64-65Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the health care sector sickness presence is common, and especially among physicians. Sickness presence is less studied than sickness absence but might have adverse effects for individual physicians, and for health care of patients (Wallace, et al, 2009). Previous research has shown that female physicians more often go to work while sick (Gustafsson et al., 2013). In this study, it is examined whether men and women also show different reasons for going to work while ill. Method and participants: The study was conducted within outpatient care in a large Swedish city (N = 283, women 64 %). The question studied were sickness presence in a long term perspective, during the last 12 months and reasons for going to work while sick (concern for colleagues; patients; workload; economy; and perceptions of own capability). Results: In a long-term perspective, women indicated that they went to work while sick more often than men, F (1,282) = 6.06, p = .014. Among the women, 37 % indicated that they often or very often go to work while ill. For men, this figure was 23.4 %. For the last 12 month, 50% of the women and 40% of the men had gone to work while sick more than two times (mean difference = ns.). Although men and women indicated similar reasons for going to work while sick, there were also interesting differences. Women indicated higher concerns for patients, and the workload as reasons for going to work while sick. On the other hand, men indicated economic concerns to a higher degree than women and that they were capable of going to work while sick.  There were no gender differences in concerns for colleagues. Conclusions: Sickness presence might have severe consequences, both for physicians themselves and for patients and medical care. Knowing the reasons for why physicians go to work is important in order to counter these behaviors. It is also important to notice that sex roles are of relevance in this type of behavior. HR departments and managers within medical care need to address these questions thoroughly and to implement strategies to decrease sickness presence among physicians.

  • 5.
    Wall, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Scheck-Gustafsson, Karin
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Eneroth, Mari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Work environment and harassment among primary health care physicians: Does ethnicity matter?2014In: International Conference on Physician Health: Milestones and transitions  - Maintaining the balance: Abstract brochure, 2014, p. 48-49Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Harassment and degrading experiences are frequently reported in the nursing workplace and is believed to be more common in highly demanding contexts (Fornés et al., 2011). Perceived discrimination based on race or sex could contribute to less engagement to work and more burnout (Volpone & Avery, 2013). Studies concluded among Canadian physician students showed that significantly more foreign-born students experienced harassment or discrimination on the basis of ethnicity or culture (Crutcher et al., 2011). In Sweden, 15 percent of the population is born abroad and integration is important to promote in the working life. There is uncovered ground among active physicians who experience harassment and unequal treatment in primary health care, why additional studies are needed. Method and participants: Participants in this cross-sectional study were primary health care physicians in central Sweden. The outcome variables were perceived harassment and unequal treatment at work, among general practitioners (N = 302). In the sample there were 64% females and 26% foreign-born. Results: Among male physicians, almost 14% of the foreign-born, compared to 3% of the native-born, reported being subject to harassment or mobbing during the last 6 months (21 = 3.983, p = .04). There was no such difference between female foreign-born and female native-born physicians. Nearly 27% of the foreign-born thought the basis for unequal treatment to be ethnicity compared to barely 9 % of the physicians born in Sweden, which is significantly less (21 = 10.008, p = .002). Among foreign-born, significantly more female than male physicians reported gender as reason for unequal treatment (21= 6.944, p < .01). There were no differences found among Swedish female and male physicians. Conclusions: There is evidence that foreign-born physicians working in primary health care in Sweden experience harassment and unequal treatment. Harassment and unequal treatment could affect physician health, and attention must be paid. The gender differences could also be a sign of gender inequality, which need to be examined more thoroughly.

  • 6.
    Wall, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Schenck-Gustafsson, Karin
    Minucci, Daria
    Gustafsson Sendén, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Løvseth, Lise Tevik
    Fridner, Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Suicidal ideation among surgeons in Italy and Sweden: a cross-sectional study2014In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 2, p. 53-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Suicidal ideation is more prevalent among physicians, compared to the population in general, but little is known about the factors behind surgeons’ suicidal ideation. A surgeon’s work environment can be competitive and characterised by degrading experiences, which could contribute to burnout, depression and even thoughts of suicide. Being a surgeon has been reported to be predictor for not seeking help when psychological distressed. The aim of the present study was to investigate to what extent surgeons in Italy and Sweden are affected by suicidal ideation, and how suicidal ideation can be associated with psychosocial work conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional study of surgeons was performed in Italy (N=149) and Sweden (N=272), where having suicidal ideation was the outcome variable. Work-related factors, such as harassment, depression and social support, were also measured. Results: Suicidal ideation within the previous twelve months was affirmatively reported by 18% of the Italian surgeons, and by 12% of the Swedish surgeons in the present study. The strongest association with having recent suicidal ideation for both countries was being subjected to degrading experiences/harassment at work by a senior physician. Sickness presenteeism, exhaustion and disengagement were related to recent suicidal ideation among Italian surgeons, while role conflicts and sickness presenteeism were associated with recent suicidal ideation in the Swedish group. For both countries, regular meetings to discuss situations at work were found to be protective. Conclusions: A high percentage of surgeons at two university hospitals in Italy and Sweden reported suicidal ideation during the year before the investigation. This reflects a tough workload, including sickness presenteeism, harassment at work, exhaustion/disengagement and role conflicts. Regular meetings to discuss work situations might be protective.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf