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  • 1.
    Aibara, Shintaro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Andréll, Juni
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Singh, Vivek
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Rapid Isolation of the Mitoribosome from HEK Cells2018In: Journal of Visualized Experiments, ISSN 1940-087X, E-ISSN 1940-087X, no 140, article id e57877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human mitochondria possess a dedicated set of ribosomes (mitoribosomes) that translate 13 essential protein components of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes encoded by the mitochondria! genome. Since all proteins synthesized by human mitoribosomes are integral membrane proteins, human mitoribosomes are tethered to the mitochondrial inner membrane during translation. Compared to the cytosolic ribosome the mitoribosome has a sedimentation coefficient of 55S, half the rRNA content, no 5S rRNA and 36 additional proteins. Therefore, a higher protein-to-RNA ratio and an atypical structure make the human mitoribosome substantially distinct from its cytosolic counterpart. Despite the central importance of the mitoribosome to life, no protocols were available to purify the intact complex from human cell lines. Traditionally, mitoribosomes were isolated from mitochondria-rich animal tissues that required kilograms of starting material. We reasoned that mitochondria in dividing HEK293-derived human cells grown in nutrient-rich expression medium would have an active mitochondrial translation, and, therefore, could be a suitable source of material for the structural and biochemical studies of the mitoribosome. To investigate its structure, we developed a protocol for large-scale purification of intact mitoribosomes from HEK cells. Herein, we introduce nitrogen cavitation method as a faster, less labor-intensive and more efficient alternative to traditional mechanical shear-based methods for cell lysis. This resulted in preparations of the mitoribosome that allowed for its structural determination to high resolution, revealing the composition of the intact human mitoribosome and its assembly intermediates. Here, we follow up on this work and present an optimized and more cost-effective method requiring only similar to 10(10) cultured HEK cells. The method can be employed to purify human mitoribosomal translating complexes, mutants, quality control assemblies and mitoribosomal subunits intermediates. The purification can be linearly scaled up tenfold if needed, and also applied to other types of cells.

  • 2. Bigalke, Janna M.
    et al.
    Aibara, Shintaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Roth, Robert
    Dahl, Göran
    Gordon, Euan
    Dorbéus, Sarah
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sandmark, Jenny
    Cryo-EM structure of the activated RET signaling complex reveals the importance of its cysteine-rich domain2019In: Science Advances, E-ISSN 2375-2548, Vol. 5, no 7, article id eaau4202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Signaling through the receptor tyrosine kinase RET is essential during normal development. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations are involved in a variety of diseases, yet the molecular details of receptor activation have remained elusive. We have reconstituted the complete extracellular region of the RET signaling complex together with Neurturin (NRTN) and GFR alpha 2 and determined its structure at 5.7-angstrom resolution by cryo-EM. The proteins form an assembly through RET-GFR alpha 2 and RET-NRTN interfaces. Two key interaction points required for RET extracellular domain binding were observed: (i) the calcium-binding site in RET that contacts GFR alpha 2 domain 3 and (ii) the RET cysteine-rich domain interaction with NRTN. The structure highlights the importance of the RET cysteine-rich domain and allows proposition of a model to explain how complex formation leads to RET receptor dimerization and its activation. This provides a framework for targeting RET activity and for further exploration of mechanisms underlying neurological diseases.

  • 3. Brown, Alan
    et al.
    Rathore, Sorbhi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kimanius, Dari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Aibara, Shintaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Bai, Xiao-chen
    Rorbach, Joanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK.
    Ramakrishnan, V.
    Structures of the human mitochondrial ribosome in native states of assembly2017In: Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, ISSN 1545-9993, E-ISSN 1545-9985, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 866-869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) have less rRNA content and 36 additional proteins compared with the evolutionarily related bacterial ribosome. These differences make the assembly of mitoribosomes more complex than the assembly of bacterial ribosomes, but the molecular details of mitoribosomal biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we report the structures of two late-stage assembly intermediates of the human mitoribosomal large subunit (mt-LSU) isolated from a native pool within a human cell line and solved by cryo-EM to similar to 3-angstrom resolution. Comparison of the structures reveals insights into the timing of rRNA folding and protein incorporation during the final steps of ribosomal maturation and the evolutionary adaptations that are required to preserve biogenesis after the structural diversification of mitoribosomes. Furthermore, the structures redefine the ribosome silencing factor (RsfS) family as multifunctional biogenesis factors and identify two new assembly factors (L0R8F8 and mt-ACP) not previously implicated in mitoribosomal biogenesis.

  • 4. Desai, Nirupa
    et al.
    Brown, Alan
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK.
    Ramakrishnan, V.
    The structure of the yeast mitochondrial ribosome2017In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 355, no 6324, p. 528-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria have specialized ribosomes (mitoribosomes) dedicated to the expression of the genetic information encoded by their genomes. Here, using electron cryomicroscopy, we have determined the structure of the 75-component yeast mitoribosome to an overall resolution of 3.3 angstroms. The mitoribosomal small subunit has been built de novo and includes 15S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 34 proteins, including 14 without homologs in the evolutionarily related bacterial ribosome. Yeast-specific rRNA and protein elements, including the acquisition of a putatively active enzyme, give the mitoribosome a distinct architecture compared to the mammalian mitoribosome. At an expanded messenger RNA channel exit, there is a binding platform for translational activators that regulate translation in yeast but not mammalian mitochondria. The structure provides insights into the evolution and species-specific specialization of mitochondrial translation.

  • 5.
    Forsberg, Björn O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Aibara, Shintaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kimanius, Dari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Paul, Bijoya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Lindahl, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Cryo-EM reconstruction of the chlororibosome to 3.2 angstrom resolution within 24 h2017In: IUCrJ, ISSN 0972-6918, E-ISSN 2052-2525, Vol. 4, p. 723-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of direct detectors and the automation of data collection in cryo-EM have led to a surge in data, creating new opportunities for advancing computational processing. In particular, on-the-fly workflows that connect data collection with three-dimensional reconstruction would be valuable for more efficient use of cryo-EM and its application as a sample-screening tool. Here, accelerated on-the-fly analysis is reported with optimized organization of the data-processing tools, image acquisition and particle alignment that make it possible to reconstruct the three-dimensional density of the 70S chlororibosome to 3.2 angstrom resolution within 24 h of tissue harvesting. It is also shown that it is possible to achieve even faster processing at comparable quality by imposing some limits to data use, as illustrated by a 3.7 angstrom resolution map that was obtained in only 80 min on a desktop computer. These on-the-fly methods can be employed as an assessment of data quality from small samples and extended to high-throughput approaches.

  • 6. Matzov, Donna
    et al.
    Aibara, Shintaro
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Basu, Arnab
    Zimmerman, Ella
    Bashan, Anat
    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yonath, Ada E.
    The cryo-EM structure of hibernating 100S ribosome dimer from pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Formation of 100S ribosome dimer is generally associated with translation suppression in bacteria. Trans-acting factors ribosome modulation factor (RMF) and hibernating promoting factor (HPF) were shown to directly mediate this process in E. coli. Gram-positive S. aureus lacks an RMF homolog and the structural basis for its 100S formation was not known. Here we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the native 100S ribosome from S. aureus, revealing the molecular mechanism of its formation. The structure is distinct from previously reported analogs and relies on the HPF C-terminal extension forming the binding platform for the interactions between both of the small ribosomal subunits. The 100S dimer is formed through interactions between rRNA h26, h40, and protein uS2, involving conformational changes of the head as well as surface regions that could potentially prevent RNA polymerase from docking to the ribosome.

  • 7. Nirwan, Neha
    et al.
    Itoh, Yuzuru
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Singh, Pratima
    Bandyopadhyay, Sutirtha
    Vinothkuman, Kutti R.
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Saikrishnan, Kayarat
    Structure-based mechanism for activation of the AAA plus GTPase McrB by the endonuclease McrC2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 3058Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The AAA+ GTPase McrB powers DNA cleavage by the endonuclease McrC. The GTPase itself is activated by McrC. The architecture of the GTPase and nuclease complex, and the mechanism of their activation remained unknown. Here, we report a 3.6 angstrom structure of a GTPase-active and DNA-binding deficient construct of McrBC. Two hexameric rings of McrB are bridged by McrC dimer. McrC interacts asymmetrically with McrB protomers and inserts a stalk into the pore of the ring, reminiscent of the gamma subunit complexed to alpha(3)beta(3) of F-1-ATPase. Activation of the GTPase involves conformational changes of residues essential for hydrolysis. Three consecutive nucleotide-binding pockets are occupied by the GTP analogue 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate and the next three by GDP, which is suggestive of sequential GTP hydrolysis.

  • 8.
    Ott, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Brown, Alan
    Organization and Regulation of Mitochondrial Protein Synthesis2016In: Annual Review of Biochemistry, ISSN 0066-4154, E-ISSN 1545-4509, Vol. 85, p. 77-101Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondria are essential organelles of endosymbiotic origin that are responsible for oxidative phosphorylation within eukaryotic cells. Independent evolution between species has generated mitochondrial genomes that are extremely diverse, with the composition of the vestigial genome determining their translational requirements. Typically, translation within mitochondria is restricted to a few key subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes that are synthesized by dedicated ribosomes (mitoribosomes). The dramatically rearranged mitochondrial genomes, the limited set of transcripts, and the need for the synthesized proteins to coassemble with nuclear-encoded subunits have had substantial consequences for the translation machinery. Recent high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy has revealed the effect of coevolution on the mitoribosome with the mitochondrial genome. In this review, we place the new structural information in the context of the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial translation and focus on the novel ways protein synthesis is organized and regulated in mitochondria.

  • 9.
    Perez Boerema, Annemarie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Aibara, Shintaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Paul, Bijoya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Tobiasson, Victor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kimanius, Dari
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Forsberg, Björn O.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Walldén, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Lindahl, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Structure of the chloroplast ribosome with chl-RRF and hibernation-promoting factor2018In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 4, p. 212-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxygenic photosynthesis produces oxygen and builds a variety of organic compounds, changing the chemistry of the air, the sea and fuelling the food chain on our planet. The photochemical reactions underpinning this process in plants take place in the chloroplast. Chloroplasts evolved ~1.2 billion years ago from an engulfed primordial diazotrophic cyanobacterium, and chlororibosomes are responsible for synthesis of the core proteins driving photochemical reactions. Chlororibosomal activity is spatiotemporally coupled to the synthesis and incorporation of functionally essential co-factors, implying the presence of chloroplast-specific regulatory mechanisms and structural adaptation of the chlororibosome1,2. Despite recent structural information3,4,5,6, some of these aspects remained elusive. To provide new insights into the structural specialities and evolution, we report a comprehensive analysis of the 2.9–3.1 Å resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure of the spinach chlororibosome in complex with its recycling factor and hibernation-promoting factor. The model reveals a prominent channel extending from the exit tunnel to the chlororibosome exterior, structural re-arrangements that lead to increased surface area for translocon binding, and experimental evidence for parallel and convergent evolution of chloro- and mitoribosomes.

  • 10. Petrov, Anton S.
    et al.
    Wood, Elizabeth C.
    Bernier, Chad R.
    Norris, Ashlyn M.
    Brown, Alan
    Amunts, Alexey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Structural Patching Fosters Divergence of Mitochondrial Ribosomes2019In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 207-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) are essential components of all mitochondria that synthesize proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome. Unlike other ribosomes, mitoribosomes are highly variable across species. The basis for this diversity is not known. Here, we examine the composition and evolutionary history of mitoribosomes across the phylogenetic tree by combining three-dimensional structural information with a comparative analysis of the secondary structures of mitochondrial rRNAs (mt-rRNAs) and available proteomic data. We generate a map of the acquisition of structural variation and reconstruct the fundamental stages that shaped the evolution of the mitoribosomal large subunit and led to this diversity. Our analysis suggests a critical role for ablation and expansion of rapidly evolving mt-rRNA. These changes cause structural instabilities that are patched by the acquisition of pre-existing compensatory elements, thus providing opportunities for rapid evolution. This mechanism underlies the incorporation of mt-tRNA into the central protuberance of the mammalian mitoribosome, and the altered path of the polypeptide exit tunnel of the yeast mitoribosome. We propose that since the toolkits of elements utilized for structural patching differ between mitochondria of different species, it fosters the growing divergence of mitoribosomes.

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