Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Balleer, Almut
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    New Evidence, Old Puzzles: Technology Shocks and Labor Market Dynamics2012In: Quantitative Economics, ISSN 1759-7323, E-ISSN 1759-7331, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 363-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Can the standard search-and-matching labor market model replicate the business cycle fluctuations of the job finding rate and the unemployment rate? In the model, these fluctuations are driven by movements in productivity. This paper investigates the sources of productivity fluctuations that are commonly interpreted as technology shocks. I estimate different types of technology shocks from structural vector autoregressions and reassess the empirical performance of the standard model based on second moments that are conditional on technology and nontechnology (preference) shocks. Most prominently, the model is able to replicate the conditional volatilities of job finding and unemployment. However, it fails to replicate the correlation of productivity with unemployment and job finding that is conditional on both technology and nontechnology shocks.

  • 2.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Gehrke, Britta
    Lechthaler, Wolfgang
    Merkl, Christian
    Does short-time work save jobs? A business cycle analysis2016In: European Economic Review, ISSN 0014-2921, E-ISSN 1873-572X, Vol. 84, p. 99-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Great Recession most OECD countries used short-time work (publicly subsidized working time reductions) to counteract a steep increase in unemployment. We show that short-time work can actually save jobs. However, there is an important distinction to be made: while the rule-based component of short-time work is a cost-efficient job saver, the discretionary component is completely ineffective. In a case study for Germany, we use the rich data available to combine micro- and macroeconomic evidence with macroeconomic modeling in order to identify, quantify and interpret these two components of short-time work.

  • 3.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gehrke, Britta
    Lechthaler, Wolfgang
    Merkl, Christian
    Does Short-Time Work Save Jobs? A Business Cycle Analysis2014Report (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gehrke, Britta
    Merkl, Christian
    Some Surprising Facts About Working Time Accounts and the Business Cycle2014Report (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. RWTH Aachen University, Germany .
    Gomez-Salvador, Ramon
    Turunen, Jarkko
    Labour force participation across Europe: a cohort-based analysis2014In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 1385-1415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a cohort-based model to analyse the determinants of labour force participation in six European economies, focusing on age and cohort effects as factors explaining differences in participation behaviour across countries. Cohort effects are particularly relevant for women with those born in the late 1960s and early 1970s more likely to participate over the life-cycle. Our results suggest that cohort effects can be interpreted as evolving social norms or preferences towards participating in the labour market according to Fernandez (NBER working paper no. 13373, 2007). We find substantial variation in the estimated age and cohort effects across European countries: cohort effects can account for a substantial part of the recent increase in participation in Spain, the Netherlands and Germany, and a positive, but smaller part of in the increase in participation of the UK, Italy and France. Looking forward, positive cohort effects could help counteract the downward impact of population ageing on participation.

  • 6.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies.
    Gómez-Salvador, Ramón
    Universität Bonn.
    Turunen, Jarkko
    European Central Bank.
    Labour Force Participation in the Euro Area: A Cohort Based Analysis2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We use a cohort based model to analyse determinants of labour force participation for disaggregated groups of workers in the euro area and the five largest euro area countries. The model captures age and cohort effects as indicators of (unobserved) determinatns of participation behaviour. We use these effects and observed determinants to construct trends and projections of labour supply. Our results suggest that age and cohort effects can account for a substantial part of the recent increase in participation. Cohort effects are particularly relevant for women with those born in the late 1960s and early 1970s more likely to participate over the life-cycle. There is substantial variation in the estimated age and cohort effects across countries. Looking forward, positive cohort effects for women are not large enough to compensate for the downward impact of population ageing on participation rates in the euro area.

  • 7.
    Balleer, Almut
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for International Economic Studies. Aachen University, Aachen, deutschland.
    van Rens, Thijs
    CREI, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona GSE, IZA and CEPR.
    Skill-Biased Technological Change and the Business Cycle2013In: Review of Economics and Statistics, ISSN 0034-6535, E-ISSN 1530-9142, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 1222-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past two decades, technological progress in the United States has been biased towards skilled labor. What does this imply for business cycles? We construct a quarterly skill premium from the CPS and use it to identify skill-biased technology shocks in VAR with long-run zero and sign restrictions. Hours fall in response to skill-biased technology shocks, indicating that part of the technology-induced fall in hours is due to a compositional shift in labor demand. Investment-specific technology shocks reduce the skill premium indicating that capital and skill are not complementary in aggregate production.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf