Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andrén, Cecilia M.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Response of Gammarus pulex and Baetis rhodani to springtime acid episodes in humic brooks2013In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 463, p. 690-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While chronic acidification of water bodies has been steadily decreasing, episodic acidification continues to affect stream biology by temporarily decreasing pH and mobilizing aluminum. These events are becoming more common as climate change renders more frequent and intense storms and flooding. Throughout Scandinavia, the effects of acidification have been mitigated by liming since the 1980s, but remediation efforts can now be reduced. While transient acidity may reduce fish populations, also other species in streams are affected. In this in-stream study, two macro-invertebrates (Gammarus pulex and Baetis rhodani), both known as salmonid prey organisms, were exposed to snowmelt in six humic brooks with a natural gradient of pH and inorganic monomeric Al (Al-i). We hypothesize that acid toxicity thresholds can be defined using lethal (mortality) and sublethal (changes in body elemental content) metrics. Periodic observations were made of mortality and whole body concentrations of base cations (BC: Ca, Mg, Na and K) and metals (Al, Fe, Zn and Mn). Mortality increased dramatically at pH < 6.0 and Al-i > 15 mu g/L for G. pulex and at pH < 5.7 and Al-i > 20 mu g/L for B. rhodani. No accumulation of Al was found. The invertebrate body Na concentration decreased when pH dropped, suggesting that osmoregulation in both species was affected. In contrast to general BC pattern, Ca concentration in G. pulex and Mg concentration in B. rhodani increased when pH decreased. Although Ali strongly correlates to pH, the Al composition of soil and bedrock also influences Al availability, potentially contributing to toxic Al; episodes. The estimated values calculated in this study can be used to improve water quality criteria and as thresholds to adjust doses of lime compared to old recommendations in ongoing liming programs. Such adjustments may be critical since both Ali and pH levels have to be balanced to mitigate damage to recovering stream ecosystems.

  • 2.
    Bighiu, Maria Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eklund, Britta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Biofouling of leisure boats as a source of metal pollution2017In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 997-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The release of harmful metals from antifouling paints to water bodies is a well-known problem. In this study, we measured both the amount of biofouling growth on leisure boats during one season as well as the concentration of metals accumulated by the biofouling matrix. Furthermore, the efficiency of antifouling paints and mechanical boat cleaning as well as the effect of hull colour on biofouling were evaluated. Unlike paint residues, biofouling waste has never been regarded as a source of metal contamination and has previously been neglected in the scientific literature. Our results revealed that the biofouling waste contained very high concentrations of metals, up to 28,000 mg copper/kg dw and 171,000 mg zinc/kg dw, which exceeds the guidance values for least sensitive land use in Sweden by factors of 140 and 340, respectively. This observation is important because the contaminated biofouling waste is commonly disposed of in boatyard soils at the end of each season, thus increasing the levels of metal pollution. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the amount of biofouling if the boats were coated with copper or zinc containing paints or no paint at all, indicating that biocide paints might not be necessary in low-salinity areas such as the Stockholm archipelago. For boats that were not painted at all during the season, those washed on boat washers (mechanically) had on average half of the amount of biofouling compared to boats that were not cleaned mechanically. The results of the study indicate the importance of proper management of biofouling waste as well as the use of more environmentally friendly removal methods for biofouling such as boat washers.

  • 3.
    Bighiu, Maria Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Carney Almroth, Bethanie
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Metal contamination in harbours impacts life-history traits and metallothionein levels in snails2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 7, article id e0180157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Harbours with limited water exchange are hotspots of contaminant accumulation. Antifouling paints (AF) contribute to this accumulation by leaching biocides that may affect non-target species. In several leisure boat harbours and reference areas in the Baltic Sea, chronic exposure effects were evaluated using caging experiments with the snail Theodoxus fluviatilis. We analysed variations in ecologically relevant endpoints (mortality, growth and reproduction) in concert with variation in metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) levels. The latter is a biomarker of exposure to metals, such as copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), which are used in AF paints as active ingredient and stabilizer, respectively. In addition, environmental samples (water, sediment) were analysed for metal (Cu and Zn) and nutrient (total phosphorous and nitrogen) concentrations. All life-history endpoints were negatively affected by the exposure, with higher mortality, reduced growth and lower fecundity in the harbours compared to the reference sites. Metal concentrations were the key explanatory variables for all observed adverse effects, suggesting that metal-driven toxicity, which is likely to stem from AF paints, is a source of anthropogenic stress for biota in the harbours.

  • 4.
    Bighiu, Maria Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Watermann, Burkard
    Guo, Xueli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Carney Almroth, Bethanie
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Mortality and histopathological effects in harbour-transplanted snails with different exposure histories2017In: Aquatic Toxicology, ISSN 0166-445X, E-ISSN 1879-1514, Vol. 190, p. 11-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contaminants are important stressors in the aquatic environment and may exert selective pressures on organisms. We hypothesized that snails originating from a metal-contaminated habitat (B) would have increased tolerance to harbour contaminants (e.g. metals from antifouling paints), compared to snails originating from a relatively clean habitat (A). We assessed tolerance to metals in terms of survival and histopathological alterations after 2, 4 and 8 weeks of in situ exposure in three Baltic Sea boat harbours and three reference sites. We also hypothesized that any potential tolerance to contaminants would be associated with differences in genetic diversity between the two snail populations (evaluated as mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, COI). The results show that snails from population A survived to a higher extent compared to population B, possibly indicating either a lack of adaptation to metals in snails B or impaired health condition due to contaminant pre-exposure or a higher resilience of snails A. Moreover, the genetic diversity of COI was low within each population and did not differ between populations. In general, 83% of all the types of histopathological alterations (e.g. lysis and necrosis of gonads and digestive gland or granulocytoma and phagocytosis in the storage tissue, among others) had a higher probability of occurrence among harbour-exposed snails compared to reference exposed snails, regardless of snail population origin. The only significant difference in histological effects between the two populations was in the frequency of parasite infestations and shell fouling, both being larger for population A than B. Interestingly, the rate of parasite infestations was higher for males than females from population A, whereas no sexual dichotomy was observed for population B. Our results show that exposure to harbour contaminants causes both lethal and sublethal toxicity to snails, and the association between many of the toxic responses and metals substantiates that antifouling substances contribute to the observed effects, although there is a large proportion of variation in our data that remains unexplained.

  • 5.
    Bighiu, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Carney Almroth, Bethanie
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Metal contamination in harbours impacts life-history traits and metallothionein levels in snailsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Bighiu, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Watermann, Burkard
    Guo, Xueli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Carney Almroth, Bethanie
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Mortality and histopathological effects in harbour-transplanted snails with different exposure historiesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 7. Dahlgren, Kristin
    et al.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, Agneta
    The influence of autotrophy, heterotrophy and temperature on pelagic food web efficiency in a brackish water system2011In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 307-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change has been suggested to lead to higher temperature and increased heterotrophy in aquatic systems. The aim of this study was to test how these two factors affect metazooplankton and food web efficiency (FWE was defined as metazooplankton production divided by basal production). We tested the following hypotheses: (1) that lower metazooplankton production and lower FWE would be found in a food web based on heterotrophic production (bacteria) relative to one based on autotrophic production (phytoplankton), since the former induces a larger number of trophic levels; (2) the metazooplankton in the heterotrophic food web would contain less essential fatty acids than those from the autotrophic food web; and (3) that higher temperature would lead to increased FWE. To test these hypotheses, a mesocosm experiment was established at two different temperatures (5 and 10A degrees C) with a dominance of either autotrophic (NP) or heterotrophic basal production (CNP). Metazooplankton production increased with temperature, but was not significantly affected by differences in basal production. However, increased heterotrophy did lead to decreased fatty acid content and lower individual weight in the zooplankton. FWE increased with autotrophy and temperature in the following order: 5CNP < 10CNP < 5NP < 10NP. Our results indicate that in the climate change scenario we considered, the temperature will have a positive effect on FWE, whereas the increase in heterotrophy will have a negative effect on FWE. Furthermore, the quality and individual weight of the metazooplankton will be reduced, with possible negative effects on higher trophic levels.

  • 8.
    Ek, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Garbaras, Andrius
    Yu, Zhenyang
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Kumblad, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Increase in stable isotope ratios driven by metabolic alterations in amphipods exposed to the beta-blocker propranolol2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0211304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropogenic pressures, such as contaminant exposure, may affect stable isotope ratios in biota. These changes are driven by alterations in the nutrient allocation and metabolic pathways induced by specific stressors. In a controlled microcosm study with the amphipod Gammarus spp., we studied effects of the beta-blocker propranolol on stable isotope signatures (delta N-15 and delta C-13), elemental composition (%C and %N), and growth (protein content and body size) as well as biomarkers of oxidative status (antioxidant capacity, ORAC; lipid peroxidation, TBARS) and neurological activity (acetylcholinesterase, AChE). Based on the known effects of propranolol exposure on cellular functions, i.e., its mode of action (MOA), we expected to observe a lower scope for growth, accompanied by a decrease in protein deposition, oxidative processes and AChE inhibition, with a resulting increase in the isotopic signatures. The observed responses in growth, biochemical and elemental variables supported most of these predictions. In particular, an increase in %N was observed in the propranolol exposures, whereas both protein allocation and body size declined. Moreover, both ORAC and TBARS levels decreased with increasing propranolol concentration, with the decrease being more pronounced for TBARS, which indicates the prevalence of the antioxidative processes. These changes resulted in a significant increase of the delta N-15 and delta C-13 values in the propranolol-exposed animals compared to the control. These findings suggest that MOA of beta-blockers may be used to predict sublethal effects in non-target species, including inhibited AChE activity, improved oxidative balance, and elevated stable isotope ratios. The latter also indicates that metabolism-driven responses to environmental contaminants can alter stable isotope signatures, which should be taken into account when interpreting trophic interactions in the food webs.

  • 9.
    Ek, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Yu, Zhenyang
    Garbaras, Andrius
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Kumblad, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Metabolic alterations in Gammarus spp. exposed to the beta-blocker propranolol: what causes the increase in stable isotope ratios?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Eklund, Britta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Hansson, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Bengtsson, Henrik
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Pollutant Concentrations and Toxic Effects on the Red Alga Ceramium tenuicorne of Sediments from Natural Harbors and Small Boat Harbors on the West Coast of Sweden2016In: Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology, ISSN 0090-4341, E-ISSN 1432-0703, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 583-594Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This investigation set out to analyze the toxicity of surface sediments in a number of natural harbors and small boat harbors on the west coast of Sweden. This was done with the growth inhibition method with Ceramium tenuicorne. Also, concentrations of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), irgarol, organotin compounds, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sediments were analyzed. The small boat harbors were heavily polluted by Cu, Zn, butyltins, and PAHs, and to a lesser extent by Pb. The Cu, Pb, Zn, and butyltins probably originated from their past and/or present use in antifouling paints, whereas the PAHs probably had multiple sources, including boat motor exhausts. The measured toxicity of the sediment was generally related to their Cu, Zn, and butyltin content, although other toxic substances than those analyzed here probably contributed to the toxicity in some of the harbors. The natural harbor sediments contained less pollutants and were less toxic than the small boat harbor sediments. Nevertheless, our data indicate that the boating pressure today may be high enough to produce toxic effects even in natural harbors in pristine areas. The strongest relationship between toxicity and the major pollutants was obtained when the sediment toxicity was expressed as gram wet weight per liter compared with gram dry weight per liter and gram total organic carbon per liter. Hence, for pollutants that can be elutriated with natural sea water, sediment toxicity expressed as gram wet weight per liter appears preferable.

  • 11.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, A.
    Benthic competition and population dynamics of Monoporeia affinis and Marenzelleria sp in the northern Baltic Sea2014In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 144, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last two decades major changes of the benthic fauna have occurred in the northern Baltic Sea, the Gulf of Bothnia. The native amphipod, Monoporeia affinis, has shown a large-scale abundance decrease, while polychaetes, Marenzelleria spp. have invaded the system. Marenzelleria co-exist with the native fauna in the southern Baltic Sea, but in the north the pelagic production might be too low to allow co-existence. Thus, M. affinis might have been out-competed by Marenzelleria in the Gulf of Bothnia. This hypothesis was tested in a competition experiment with a high and a low fresh phytoplankton food supply. When exposed to high food supply both species showed stable or increased biomass over the four week test period. In low food supply, however, M. affinis was found to have a competitive advantage. The experimental data were also related to Baltic Sea monitoring data on primary production, sedimentation and invertebrate abundances. Data from the northern Baltic Sea show that the dominance in the benthic community by M. affinis was replaced by Marenzelleria around 2001. The amphipod decrease might be explained by a marked decrease in primary production during this period. Combining monitoring and experimental data suggests that the invasion of Marenzelleria did not cause the decrease of M. affinis in the northern Baltic Sea; it rather took advantage of the density gap that had occurred. A shift may thus have been established in the Bothnian Sea benthic community.

  • 12.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Thorsen, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Kumblad, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Behavioural and physiological responses to pharmaceutical exposure in macroalgae and grazers from a Baltic Sea littoral community2011In: Aquatic Biology, ISSN 1864-7782, E-ISSN 1864-7790, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 29-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gammarus spp. and Fucus vesiculosus from the Baltic Sea littoral community were exposed to 3 concentrations of the pharmaceuticals ibuprofen and propranolol. Both physiological and behavioural parameters were measured to examine potential effects in the organisms. For Gammarus spp., respiration, feeding rate and activity with and without predator cues were measured, and gross production to respiration ratio (GP/R) and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured for F. vesiculosus. The results showed that propranolol decreased the activity related to movement, and Gammarus spp. could not compensate for the reduced movement when subjected to predator cues. The feeding rates of Gammarus spp. exposed to propranolol were more than 2 times higher at all concentrations compared to the control. Ibuprofen did not significantly affect any of the measured parameters of Gammarus spp. The GP/R was lower in algae exposed to propranolol. The effects of propranolol on both behaviour and physiology of Gammarus spp., in combination with the stress responses in the algae, might cause unexpected indirect and cascade effects which eventually could have implications at both community and ecosystem scales.

  • 13.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Vilhelmsson, S.
    Stockholm University.
    Wiklund, Stig Johan
    Stockholm University.
    Eklund, Britta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Contaminants and habitat choice in the Baltic Sea: Behavioural experiments with the native species, Monoporeia affinis, and the invasive genus, Marenzelleria2009In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 81, p. 238-246Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The invasive polychaete genus, Marenzelleria and the native amphipod, Monoporeia affinis are food and habitat competitors in the Baltic Sea. Previous studies have shown that moderate densities of Marenzelleria can affect the behaviour of M. affinis. To examine the short-term interactive effects of interspecific habitat choice and environmental contaminants a series of habitat colonisation experiments were performed. The contaminants examined included harbor sediments and sediment spiked with the antifouling substances, Cu, Zn and Irgarol. Polychaetes and amphipods were exposed to contaminants in single-species and two-species experiments. In spiked-sediment experiments, M. affinis showed clear dose-dependent response. These experiments verified that behavioural response of M. affinis to different habitats is a sensitive method for testing toxicity under controlled conditions. In experiments with three different harbor sediments and reference sediment both species showed the lowest preference for the reference sediment. This sediment also had the lowest content of quality food, indicating that factors such as food quality and quantity may override the disturbing effects of contaminants in natural sediments. The presence of Marenzelleria spp. did not affect amphipod habitat choice, indicating no short-term effects, which implies that both species can co-exist provided sufficient food is available.

  • 14.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, A
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sundelin, B
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Rosa, R.
    Population decline of amphipod Monoporeia affinis in Northern Europe: consequence of food shortage and competition?2008In: J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol., Vol. 367, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kumblad, Linda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Palmer, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Response and recovery of Baltic Sea blue mussels from exposure to pharmaceuticals2015In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 526, p. 89-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiological responses to, and recovery from, exposure to 3 concentrations of a pharmaceutical mixture (diclofenac and propranolol) were examined experimentally in Baltic Sea blue mussels Mytilus edulis trossulus collected with increasing distance to a wastewater treatment plant (WTP) outlet. Respiration, absorption efficiency and consumption were measured, and also combined into scope for growth (SFG). The response and recovery patterns varied both between exposure concentrations and sampling site within the bay. After exposure, mussels exposed to the highest concentration (2000 mu g l(-1)) in general had lower SFG, and mussels from 2 (out of 3) sites exposed to the medium concentration (200 mu g l(-1)) had higher SFG than the controls. In general, mussels from the 2 sites nearest the WTP recovered from the exposure response, while individuals collected further from the WTP outlet were more affected by the exposure and did not recover to the same extent. The response pattern of consumption was mainly affected by exposure concentration, whereas respiration was affected by all 3 factors (concentration, time of measurement, sampling site). Absorption efficiency was not affected at all. The differences in responses and recovery patterns could possibly be explained by the mussels sampled closer to the WTP having a history of higher food availability, improving their general health status, and/or a history of pre-exposure to natural disturbances, as well as to the test substances, via the WTP effluent. Pre-exposure to stressors could have both positive and negative impact on a community by increasing the resilience towards some stressors, but may also reduce the adaptability when facing other stressors.

  • 16.
    Lagerström, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ferreira, João
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Ytreberg, Erik
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Flawed risk assessment of antifouling paints leads to exceedance of guideline values in Baltic Sea marinasManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Mustajärvi, Lukas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eek, Espen
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Undeman, Emma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre.
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    In situ benthic flow-through chambers to determine sediment-to-water fluxes of legacy hydrophobic organic contaminants2017In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 231, p. 854-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Contaminated sediment can release hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and thereby act as a secondary source of primarily legacy hazardous substances to the water column. There is therefore a need for assessments of the release of HOCs from contaminated sediment for prioritization of management actions. In situ assessment of HOC sediment-to-water flux is currently done with (closed) benthic flux chambers, which have a sampling time exceeding one month. During this time, the water inside the chamber is depleted of oxygen and the effect of bioturbation on the sediment-to-water release of HOCs is largely ignored. Here we present a novel benthic flux chamber, which measures sediment-to-water flux of legacy HOCs within days, and includes the effect of bioturbation since ambient oxygen levels inside the chamber are maintained by continuous pumping of water through the chamber. This chamber design allows for sediment-to-water flux measurements under more natural conditions. The chamber design was tested in a contaminated Baltic Sea bay. Measured fluxes were 62–2300 ng m−2 d−1 for individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 5.5–150 ng m−2 d−1 for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These fluxes were 3–23 times (PAHs) and 12–74 times (PCBs) higher than fluxes measured with closed benthic chambers deployed in parallel at the same location. We hypothesize that the observed difference in HOC flux between the two chamber designs are partly an effect of bioturbation. This hypothesized effect of bioturbation was in accordance with literature data from experimental studies.

  • 18.
    Mustajärvi, Lukas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Jahnke, Annika
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Transferring mixtures of chemicals from sediment to a bioassay using silicone-based passive sampling and dosing2017In: Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, ISSN 2050-7887, E-ISSN 2050-7895, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 1404-1413Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental mixtures of chemicals consist of a countless number of compounds with unknown identity and quantity. Yet, chemical regulation is mainly built around the assessment of single chemicals. Existing frameworks for assessing the toxicity of mixtures require that both the chemical composition and quantity are known. Quantitative analyses of the chemical composition of environmental mixtures are however extremely challenging and resource-demanding. Bioassays may therefore serve as a useful approach for investigating the combined toxicity of environmental mixtures of chemicals in a cost-efficient and holistic manner. In this study, an unknown environmental mixture of bioavailable semi-hydrophobic to hydrophobic chemicals was sampled from a contaminated sediment in a coastal Baltic Sea area using silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as an equilibrium passive sampler. The chemical mixture was transferred to a PDMS-based passive dosing system, and its applicability was demonstrated using green algae Tetraselmis suecica in a cell viability assay. The proportion of dead cells increased significantly with increasing exposure level and in a dose–response manner. At an ambient concentration, the proportion of dead cells in the population was nearly doubled compared to the control; however, the difference was non-significant due to high inter-replicate variability and a low number of replicates. The validation of the test system regarding equilibrium sampling, loading efficiency into the passive dosing polymer, stability of the mixture composition, and low algal mortality in control treatments demonstrates that combining equilibrium passive sampling and passive dosing is a promising tool for investigating the toxicity of bioavailable semi-hydrophobic and hydrophobic chemicals in complex environmental mixtures.

  • 19.
    Mustajärvi, Lukas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Nybom, Inna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eek, Espen
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    How Important is Bioturbation for Sediment-to-Water Flux of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Baltic Sea?2019In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1803-1810Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study a recently developed benthic flow-through chamber was used to assess the sediment-to-water flux of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 4 sites on the Swedish Baltic Sea coast. The flow-through chamber allows for assessment of the potential effect of bioturbation on the sediment-to-water flux of hydrophobic organic contaminants. The sediments at the 4 investigated sites have both varying contamination degree and densities of bioturbating organisms. The flux of individual PAHs measured with the flow-through chamber ranged between 21 and 510, 11 and 370, 3 and 9700, and 62 and 2300 ng m(-2) d(-1) for the 4 sites. To assess the potential effect of bioturbation on the sediment-to-water flux, 3 flow-through and closed chambers were deployed in parallel at each site. The activity of benthic organisms is attenuated or halted because of depletion of oxygen in closed benthic chambers. Therefore, the discrepancy in flux measured with the 2 different chamber designs was used as an indication of a possible effect of bioturbation. A potential effect of bioturbation on the sediment-to-water flux by a factor of 3 to 55 was observed at sites with a high density of bioturbating organisms (e.g., Marenzelleria spp., Monoporeia affinis, and Macoma balthica of approximately 860-1200 individuals m(-2)) but not at the site with much lower organism density (<200 individuals m(-2)). One site had a high organism density and a low potential effect of bioturbation, which we hypothesize to be caused by the dominance of oligochaetes/polychaetes at this site because worms (Marenzelleria spp.) reach deeper into the sediment than native crustaceans and mollusks.

  • 20.
    Mustajärvi, Lukas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Nybom, Inna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Eek, Espen
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Sobek, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    What the flux? – Field assessment of sediment-to-water fluxes of PAHs on the Swedish Baltic Sea coast and the impact of bioturbationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Lindh, Karolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Kumblad, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Effect studies of human pharmaceuticals on Fucus vesiculosus and Gammarus spp2012In: Marine Environmental Research, ISSN 0141-1136, E-ISSN 1879-0291, Vol. 74, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In two experiments, the human pharmaceutical propranolol negatively affected the physiology of two test organisms, Fucus vesiculosus and Gammarus spp. from a Baltic Sea littoral community in a concentration of 1000 mu g l(-1). Some effects were also observed for the lower, more ecologically relevant concentrations (10 mu g l(-1) and 100 mu g l(-1)). The effects on E vesiculosus not only increased with increasing concentration, but also with exposure time; while the effects on Gammarus spp. were more inconsistent over time. No clear effects of the pharmaceuticals diclofenac and ibuprofen were observed for any of the organisms. Physiological parameters measured were GP:R-ratio, chlorophyll fluorescence and release of coloured dissolved organic matter, respiration and ammonium excretion. Pharmaceutical substances are repeatedly detected in the Baltic Sea which is the recipient for SIP effluents from more than 85 million people living in the catchment area, but the knowledge of their effects on non-target organisms is still very limited.

  • 22.
    Oskarsson, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Thorsén, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Analytical Chemistry.
    Danielsson, Gabriela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kumblad, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Community Interactions Modify the Effects of Pharmaceutical Exposure: A Microcosm Study on Responses to Propranolol in Baltic Sea Coastal Organisms2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, article id e93774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the uptake and effects of a common human pharmaceutical, propranolol, on the structure and function of a coastal Baltic Sea model community consisting of macroalga (Ceramium tenuicorne), mussels (Mytilus edulis trossulus), amphipods (Gammarus spp.), water and sediment. The most sensitive species, the mussel, was affected to the same extent as in previous single species studies, while the effects on the amphipod and alga were smaller or even positive compared to experiments performed in less complex test systems. The observed cascade of beneficial effects was a result of inter-specific species interactions that buffered for more severe effects. The poor condition of the mussel led to a feeding shift from alga to mussel by the amphipods. The better food quality, due to the dietary shift, counteracted the effects of the exposure. Less amphipod grazing, together with increased levels of nutrients in the water was favourable for the alga, despite the negative effects of propranolol. This microcosm study showed effects on organisms on different organizational levels as well as interactions among the different components resulting in indirect exposure effects of both functional and structural nature. The combination of both direct and indirect effects would not have been detected using simpler single- or even two-species study designs. The observed structural changes would in the natural environment have a long-term influence on ecosystem function, especially in a low-biodiversity ecosystem like the Baltic Sea.

  • 23.
    Reutgard, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sundelin, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Embryo development of the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis as a tool for monitoring and assessment of biological effects of contaminants in the field: A meta-analysis2014In: Ecological Indicators, ISSN 1470-160X, E-ISSN 1872-7034, Vol. 36, p. 483-490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Embryo malformations in the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis have been used as a biological effect indicator of chemical contaminants for more than three decades. The results from field studies along the Swedish Baltic Sea coast, comprising more than 50,000 analyzed embryos, were synthesized using a meta-analytic approach. This approach generated a quantitative and statistically defensible summary and enabled us to explore potential causative factors. The study aimed at evaluating the usefulness of embryo malformations as a biological effect indicator of chemical contaminants in the field. The result shows that malformations in M. affinis are ubiquitous in polluted areas and are negatively correlated with distance from main sources of contaminants. The result also shows that malformations are significantly more frequent up to more than 10 km from point sources. We conclude that embryo malformations in M. affinis can provide useful information for management and environmental policy in the Baltic Sea region as: (1) the present study supports evidence from controlled laboratory studies that there is a cause and effect relationship between embryo malformations and contaminants; (2) the study suggests that the indicator is contaminant-sensitive and can therefore serve as an early warning of biological effects in the field; (3) the indicator is general, suggesting that it has capability to monitor and detect effects of a wide variety of known, and yet unknown, chemical contaminants. The usefulness is further strengthened by the fact that M. affinis is a widely distributed species that plays a fundamental role in the Baltic Sea ecosystem. Future research should increase the understanding of how environmental factors affect the indicator response and if the response is related to effects at lower and higher levels of biological organization.

  • 24.
    Sundelin,
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Löf,
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Jacobson, T.
    Vitmärlan varnar för föroreningar2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Sundelin,
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Löf,
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson, Ann-Kristin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Jacobson, T.
    Järnberg, Ulf
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Berger, Urs
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Effekter av PFOS kontaminerade sediment från Mälaren2007Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Sundelin, B
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eriksson-Wiklund, A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Ford, A.T.
    Biological effects of contaminants: The use of embryo aberrations in amphipod crustaceans for measuring effects of environmental stressors2008In: TIMES, ISSN 978-87-7482-013-0, Vol. 41, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Sundelin, B
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Rosa, R.
    Eriksson-Wiklund, A
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Reproduction disorders in the benthic amphipod Monoporeia affinis: an effect of low food resources2008In: Aquat. Biol., Vol. 2, p. 179-190Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Liewenborg, Birgitta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Gorokhova, Elena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sucralose Induces Biochemical Responses in Daphnia magna2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 4, p. e92771-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS) in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L-1). The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  • 29.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Breitholtz, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Sucralose - An ecotoxicological challenger?2012In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 50-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The non-calorie sweetener sucralose - sucrose containing three chlorine atoms - is intensively sweet and has become a popular substitute for sugar. Its widespread use, exceptional stability in combination with high water solubility have thus resulted in contamination of recipient waters. Earlier studies on sucralose in aquatic organisms indicate low bioaccumulation potential and negligible acute/chronic toxicity, but the close structural resemblance with sucrose in combination with the importance of sugar in nature, warrant a more detailed ecotoxicological assessment. The aim of this investigation was therefore to study behavioural and physiological effects of sucralose in crustaceans. Our results show that both physiology and locomotion behaviour were affected by exposure to sucralose. In Daphnia magna, the behavioural response was manifested as altered swimming height and increased swimming speed, whereas in gammarids the time to reach food and shelter was prolonged. Regardless if these behavioural responses were initiated via traditional toxic mechanisms or stimulatory effects, they should be considered as a warning, since exposed organisms may diverge from normal behaviour, which ultimately can have ecological consequences.

  • 30.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Dahlgren, K.
    Sundelin, Brita
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Andersson, A.
    Effects of warming and shifts of pelagic food web structure on benthic productivity in a coastal marine system2009In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 396, p. 13-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been predicted that climate change will lead to increased temperature and precipitation in northern latitudes, which in turn may lead to brownification of coastal sea areas. This will increase the importance of the heterotrophic microbial food web in areas like the northern Baltic Sea. Such a structural change in the pelagic food web would hamper benthic productivity, since microheterotrophs have lower settling rates than phytoplankton. We tested how variation in temperature and alteration of the pelagic food web structure affected the productivity of a key benthic species, the amphipod Monopoeria affinis, and the pelagic-benthic food web efficiency (FWE). Using water from the northern Baltic Sea, a mesocosm experiment was performed in which the temperature was altered by 5 degrees C. The structure of the pelagic food web changed from one based on algae to one based on bacteria. Amphipod productivity was 3 times higher and FWE was 25 times higher in the algae than in the bacteria-based food web, showing that an altered pelagic food web will have severe effects on benthic productivity. Temperature variation, on the other hand, did not cause any changes in either growth of M. affinis or FWE. Our data indicate that indirect effects of climate change, leading to structural changes in the pelagic food web, will have much more severe effects on benthic productivity than the direct effect of increased temperature.

  • 31.
    Wiklund, Ann-Kristin Eriksson
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Malm, Torleif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Honkakangas, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Eklund, Britta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Spring development of hydrolittoral rock shore communities on wave-exposed and sheltered sites in the northern Baltic proper2012In: Oceanologia, ISSN 0078-3234, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 75-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Spring development in the hydrolittoral zone was investigated at five wave-sheltered and five wave-exposed sites on four occasions from late March to late May (every third week). The number of species was higher at the sheltered locations and increased significantly over time. The difference in community structure was significant: over 95% of the Bray-Curtis dissimilarities were due to the biomass of only eleven taxa, and the total Bray-Curtis dissimilarity between exposed and sheltered sites was 75%. Macroalgae made up 70-80% of the total biomass and was dominated by filamentous species. In contrast to previous studies, macroalgal biomass was higher at the exposed sites, which may be due to the fact that this was a spring study, unlike previous studies, which were conducted during summer.

1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf