Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Mehta, Neil K.
    et al.
    Martikainen, Pekka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. University of Helsinki, Finland; The Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany.
    Cederström, Agneta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Age at Immigration, Generational Status, and Death Among Children of Immigrant Mothers: A Longitudinal Analysis of Siblings2019In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 188, no 7, p. 1237-1244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies have documented that age at immigration and generational status are important predictors of socioeconomic outcomes among children of immigrants. Whether these characteristics are related to long-term risk of death is unknown. Leveraging variation within sibships, we evaluated the association of age at immigration and generational status (i.e., first or second generation) with death among children of immigrant mothers to Sweden. Data included 272,429 individuals (126,701 sibships) aged 15 or more years from the total Swedish population followed between 1990 and 2009. Population-average and sibling fixed-effect regressions were estimated, with the latter controlling for unobserved factors shared by siblings. The foreign-born children of immigrants experienced a 17% higher risk of death than the Swedish-born children of immigrants. This excess risk was evident for external and nonexternal causes of death. In general, a graded association was not detected between age at immigration and death among the foreign-born individuals; however, those arriving during primary school ages appeared especially vulnerable. This study provides robust evidence that among children of immigrants, being foreign born was associated with a long-term death penalty compared with being born in the host country.

  • 2. Saarela, Jan
    et al.
    Cederström, Agneta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Rostila, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Birth order and mortality in two ethno-linguistic groups: register-based evidence from Finland2016In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 158, p. 8-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has documented an association between birth order and suicide, although no study has examined whether it depends on the cultural context. Our aim was to study the association between birth order and cause-specific mortality in Finland, and whether it varies by ethno-linguistic affiliation. We used data from the Finnish population register, representing a 5% random sample of all Finnish speakers and a 20% random sample of Swedish speakers, who lived in Finland in any year 1987-2011. For each person, there was a link to all children who were alive in 1987. In total, there were 254,059 siblings in 96,387 sibling groups, and 9797 deaths. We used Cox regressions stratified by each siblings group and estimated all-cause and cause-specific mortality risks during the period 1987-2011. In line with previous research from Sweden, deaths from suicide were significantly associated with birth order. As compared to first-born, second-born had a suicide risk of 1.27, third-born of 1.35, and fourth- or higher-born of 1.72, while other causes of death did not display an evident and consistent birth-order pattern. Results for the Finnish-speaking siblings groups were almost identical to those based on both ethno-linguistic groups. In the Swedish-speaking siblings groups, there was no increase in the suicide risk by birth order, but a statistically not significant tendency towards an association with other external causes of death and deaths from cardiovascular diseases. Our findings provided evidence for an association between birth order and suicide among Finnish speakers in Finland, while no such association was found for Swedish speakers, suggesting that the birth order effect might depend on the cultural context.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf