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  • 1.
    Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Novel thiazolidinediones distinguish between (UCP1-independent) antidiabetic effects (MSDC-0602) and adipogenic and browning-inducing effects (MSDC-0160) of classical thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiazolinediones (TZDs), also called glitazones, are a class of drugs traditionally used forimproving glucose tolerance in type II diabetes mellitus. The beneficial effects ofthiazolidinedione are believed to be caused by the drug binding to the nuclear receptor PPARγ,which in turn triggers a general adipogenic program in white adipose tissue, and apparentthermogenic recruitment of brown and brite/beige fat. Here, we present a comparison of thephysiological effects of three thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone, MSDC-0602, and MSDC-0160)in C57BL/6 mice fed high-fat diet and housed at thermoneutrality. Rosiglitazone and MSDC-0160 caused the classically-described thiazolidinedione effects of increased fat mass,hyperphagia, and increased UCP1 levels in brown adipose tissue. MSDC-0602 and rosiglitazoneimproved glucose tolerance but MSDC-0602 did not induce increased fat mass, hyperphagia, orincreased UCP1 levels in brown fat. The beneficial effects of thiazolidinediones were fullypresent even in UCP1-KO mice, providing evidence for a dissociation between thiazolidinedioneinducedadipose tissue browning and their antidiabetic effects. We conclude that even structurallysimilar thiazolidinediones can act through distinct pathways, and that the glucose-loweringeffects of this class do not seem to rely on PPAR-γ-induced browning of adipose tissues.

  • 2. Fischer, Katrin
    et al.
    Ruiz, Henry H.
    Jhun, Kevin
    Finan, Brian
    Oberlin, Douglas J.
    van der Heide, Verena
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Wolf, Yochai
    Clemmensen, Christoffer
    Shin, Andrew C.
    Divanovic, Senad
    Brombacher, Frank
    Glasmacher, Elke
    Keipert, Susanne
    Jastroch, Martin
    Nagler, Joachim
    Schramm, Karl-Werner
    Medrikova, Dasa
    Collden, Gustav
    Woods, Stephen C.
    Herzig, Stephan
    Homann, Dirk
    Jung, Steffen
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Tschoep, Matthias H.
    Mueller, Timo D.
    Buettner, Christoph
    Alternatively activated macrophages do not synthesize catecholamines or contribute to adipose tissue adaptive thermogenesis2017In: Nature Medicine, ISSN 1078-8956, E-ISSN 1546-170X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 623-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive thermogenesis is the process of heat generation in response to cold stimulation. It is under the control of the sympathetic nervous system, whose chief effector is the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE). NE enhances thermogenesis through beta 3-adrenergic receptors to activate brown adipose tissue and by 'browning' white adipose tissue. Recent studies have reported that alternative activation of macrophages in response to interleukin (IL)-4 stimulation induces the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a key enzyme in the catecholamine synthesis pathway, and that this activation provides an alternative source of locally produced catecholamines during the thermogenic process. Here we report that the deletion of Th in hematopoietic cells of adult mice neither alters energy expenditure upon cold exposure nor reduces browning in inguinal adipose tissue. Bone marrow-derived macrophages did not release NE in response to stimulation with IL-4, and conditioned media from IL-4-stimulated macrophages failed to induce expression of thermogenic genes, such as uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), in adipocytes cultured with the conditioned media. Furthermore, chronic treatment with IL-4 failed to increase energy expenditure in wild-type, Ucp1(-/-) and interleukin-4 receptor-alpha double-negative (Il4ra(-/-)) mice. In agreement with these findings, adipose-tissue-resident macrophages did not express TH. Thus, we conclude that alternatively activated macrophages do not synthesize relevant amounts of catecholamines, and hence, are not likely to have a direct role in adipocyte metabolism or adaptive thermogenesis.

  • 3. Gomez Rodriguez, Alexia
    et al.
    Naudi, Alba
    Kalinovich, Anastasia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pauter, Anna Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Pamplona, Reinald
    Dobrzyn, Pawel
    Shabalina, Irina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Jacobsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Elovl2-ablation leads to mitochondrial DHA-deficiency and reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency in mouse liverManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4. Hilse, Karolina E.
    et al.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Rupprecht, Anne
    Smorodchenko, Alina
    Zeitz, Ute
    Staniek, Katrin
    Erben, Reinhold G.
    Pohl, Elena E.
    The expression of UCP3 directly correlates to UCP1 abundance in brown adipose tissue2016In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1857, no 1, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    UCP1 and UCP3 are members of the uncoupling protein (UCP) subfamily and are localized in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Whereas UCP1's central role in non-shivering thermogenesis is acknowledged, the function and even tissue expression pattern of UCP3 are still under dispute. Because UCP3 properties regarding transport of protons are qualitatively identical to those of UCP1, its expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) alongside UCP1 requires justification. In this work, we tested whether any correlation exists between the expression of UCP1 and UCP3 in BAT by quantification of protein amounts in mouse tissues at physiological conditions, in cold-acclimated and UCP1 knockout mice. Quantification using recombinant UCP3 revealed that the UCP3 amount in BAT (0.51 ng/(mu g total tissue protein)) was nearly one order of magnitude higher than that in muscles and heart. Cold-acclimated mice showed an approximate three-fold increase in UCP3 abundance in BAT in comparison to mice in thermoneutral conditions. Surprisingly, we found a significant decrease of UCP3 in BAT of UCP1 knockout mice, whereas the protein amount in skeletal and heart muscles remained constant. UCP3 abundance decreased even more in cold-acclimated UCP1 knockout mice. Protein quantification in UCP3 knockout mice revealed no compensatory increase in UCP1 or UCP2 expression. Our results do not support the participation of UCP3 in thermogenesis in the absence of UCP1 in BAT, but clearly demonstrate the correlation in abundance between both proteins. The latter is important for understanding UCP3's function in BAT.

  • 5.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    de Jong, Jasper M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    UCP1 in adipose tissues: two steps to full browning2017In: Biochimie, ISSN 0300-9084, E-ISSN 1638-6183, Vol. 134, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility that brown adipose tissue thermogenesis can be recruited in order to combat the development of obesity has led to a high interest in the identification of "browning agents", i.e. agents that increase the amount and activity of UCP1 in brown and brite/beige adipose tissues. However, functional analysis of the browning process yields confusingly different results when the analysis is performed in one of two alternative steps. Thus, in one of the steps, using cold acclimation as a potent model browning agent, we find that if the browning process is followed in mice initially housed at 21 °C (the most common procedure), there is only weak molecular evidence for increases in UCP1 gene expression or UCP1 protein abundance in classical brown adipose tissue; however, in brite/beige adipose depots, there are large increases, apparently associating functional browning with events only in the brite/beige tissues. Contrastingly, in another step, if the process is followed starting with mice initially housed at 30 °C (thermoneutrality for mice, thus similar to normal human conditions), large increases in UCP1 gene expression and UCP1 protein abundance are observed in the classical brown adipose tissue depots; there is then practically no observable UCP1 gene expression in brite/beige tissues. This apparent conundrum can be resolved when it is realized that the classical brown adipose tissue at 21 °C is already essentially fully differentiated and thus expands extensively through proliferation upon further browning induction, rather than by further enhancing cellular differentiation. When the limiting factor for thermogenesis, i.e. the total amount of UCP1 protein per depot, is analyzed, classical brown adipose tissue is by far the predominant site for the browning process, irrespective of which of the two steps is analyzed. There are to date no published data demonstrating that alternative browning agents would selectively promote brite/beige tissues versus classical brown tissue to a higher degree than does cold acclimation. Thus, to restrict investigations to examine adipose tissue depots where only a limited part of the adaptation process occurs (i.e. the brite/beige tissues) and to use initial conditions different from the thermoneutrality normally experienced by adult humans may seriously hamper the identification of therapeutically valid browning agents. The data presented here have therefore important implications for the analysis of the potential of browning agents and the nature of human brown adipose tissue.

  • 6.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation.
    Mattsson, C. L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Youssef, M. R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Ost, M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Skulachev, V. P.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russian Federation.
    Mitochondria-targeted dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP) combats high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice2016In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 1864-1874Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A membrane-penetrating cation, dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP), facilitates the recycling of fatty acids in the artificial lipid membrane and mitochondria. C12TPP can dissipate mitochondrial membrane potential and may affect total energy expenditure and body weight in animals and humans. METHODS: We investigated the metabolic effects of C12TPP in isolated brown-fat mitochondria, brown adipocyte cultures and mice in vivo. Experimental approaches included the measurement of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, western blotting, magnetic resonance imaging and bomb calorimetry. RESULTS: In mice, C12TPP (50 mu mol per (day.kg body weight)) in the drinking water significantly reduced body weight (12%, P<0.001) and body fat mass (24%, P<0.001) during the first 7 days of treatment. C12TPP did not affect water palatability and intake or the energy and lipid content in feces. The addition of C12TPP to isolated brown-fat mitochondria resulted in increased oxygen consumption. Three hours of pretreatment with C12TPP also increased oligomycin-insensitive oxygen consumption in brown adipocyte cultures (P<0.01). The effects of C12TPP on mitochondria, cells and mice were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). However, C12TPP treatment increased the mitochondrial protein levels in the brown adipose tissue of both wild-type and UCP1-knockout mice. Pair-feeding revealed that one-third of the body weight loss in C12TPP-treated mice was due to reduced food intake. C12TPP treatment elevated the resting metabolic rate (RMR) by up to 18% (P<0.05) compared with pair-fed animals. C12TPP reduced the respiratory exchange ratio, indicating enhanced fatty acid oxidation in mice. CONCLUSIONS: C12TPP combats diet-induced obesity by reducing food intake, increasing the RMR and enhancing fatty acid oxidation.

  • 7.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia.
    Novel mitochondrial cationic uncoupler C(4)R1 is an effective treatment for combating obesity in mice2015In: Biochemistry (Moscow), ISSN 0006-2979, E-ISSN 1608-3040, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 620-628Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is associated with premature mortality, impaired quality of life, and large healthcare costs. However, treatment options remain quite limited. Here we studied potential anti-obesity effects of a novel cationic mitochondrial uncoupler, C(4)R1 (derivative of rhodamine 19) in C57Bl/6 mice. Obesity was induced by long-term (eight weeks) high fat diet feeding at thermoneutrality. The treated group of mice received consecutively two doses of C(4)R1 in drinking water (30 and 12-14 mu mol/kg daily) during 30 days. Effects of C(4)R1 were dose-dependent. After six days of C(4)R1 treatment at dose 30 mu mol/kg daily, food intake was reduced by 68%, body weight by 19%, and fat mass by 21%. Body weight decrease was explained partly by reduced food intake and partly by increased metabolism, likely resulting from uncoupling. Body fat reduction upon C(4)R1 treatment was associated with improved lipid utilization estimated from decrease in respiratory quotient to the minimal level (0.7). Interestingly, the classical uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol at similar dose (27 mu mol/kg daily) did not have any effect. Our results are relevant to the search for substances causing mild uncoupling of mitochondria that could be a promising therapeutic strategy to treat obesity.

  • 8. Logan, Angela
    et al.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Prime, Tracy A.
    Rogatti, Sebastian
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Hartley, Richard C.
    Budd, Ralph C.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Murphy, Michael P.
    In vivo levels of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide increase with age in mtDNA mutator mice2014In: Aging Cell, ISSN 1474-9718, E-ISSN 1474-9726, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 765-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mtDNA mutator mice, mtDNA mutations accumulate leading to a rapidly aging phenotype. However, there is little evidence of oxidative damage to tissues, and when analyzed ex vivo, no change in production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by mitochondria has been reported, undermining the mitochondrial oxidative damage theory of aging. Paradoxically, interventions that decrease mitochondrial ROS levels in vivo delay onset of aging. To reconcile these findings, we used the mitochondria-targeted mass spectrometry probe MitoB to measure hydrogen peroxide within mitochondria of living mice. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide was the same in young mutator and control mice, but as the mutator mice aged, hydrogen peroxide increased. This suggests that the prolonged presence of mtDNA mutations in vivo increases hydrogen peroxide that contributes to an accelerated aging phenotype, perhaps through the activation of pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory redox signaling pathways.

  • 9.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids directly activate uncoupling protein 1 in brown-fat mitochondria2016In: Archives of Toxicology, ISSN 0340-5761, E-ISSN 1432-0738, Vol. 90, no 5, p. 1117-1128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) can display fatty acid-like activity in biological systems. The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue is physiologically (re)activated by fatty acids, including octanoate. This leads to bioenergetically uncoupled energy dissipation (heat production, thermogenesis). We have examined here the possibility that PFOA/PFOS can directly (re)activate UCP1 in isolated mouse brown-fat mitochondria. In wild-type brown-fat mitochondria, PFOS and PFOA overcame GDP-inhibited thermogenesis, leading to increased oxygen consumption and dissipated membrane potential. The absence of this effect in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-ablated mice indicated that it occurred through activation of UCP1. A competitive type of inhibition by increased GDP concentrations indicated interaction with the same mechanistic site as that utilized by fatty acids. No effect was observed in heart mitochondria, i.e., in mitochondria without UCP1. The stimulatory effect of PFOA/PFOS was not secondary to non-specific mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or to ROS production. Thus, metabolic effects of perfluorinated fatty acids could include direct brown adipose tissue (UCP1) activation. The possibility that this may lead to unwarranted extra heat production and thus extra utilization of food resources, leading to decreased fitness in mammalian wildlife, is discussed, as well as possible negative effects in humans. However, a possibility to utilize PFOA-/PFOS-like substances for activating UCP1 therapeutically in obesity-prone humans may also be envisaged.

  • 10.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Petrovic, Natasa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    de Jong, Jasper M. A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Kalinovich, Anastasia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    UCP1 in Brite/Beige Adipose Tissue Mitochondria Is Functionally Thermogenic2013In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 1196-1203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of white fat browning, in which certain white adipose tissue depots significantly increase gene expression for the uncoupling protein UCP1 and thus supposedly acquire thermogenic, fat-burning properties, has attracted considerable attention. Because the mRNA increases are from very low initial levels, the metabolic relevance of the change is unclear: is the UCP1 protein thermogenically competent in these brite/beige-fat mitochondria? We found that, in mitochondria isolated from the inguinal white adipose depot of cold-acclimated mice, UCP1 protein levels almost reached those in brown-fat mitochondria. The UCP1 was thermogenically functional, in that these mitochondria exhibited UCP1-dependent thermogenesis with lipid or carbohydrate substrates with canonical guanosine diphosphate (GDP) sensitivity and loss of thermogenesis in UCP1 knockout (KO) mice. Obesogenic mouse strains had a lower thermogenic potential than obesity-resistant strains. The thermogenic density (UCP1-dependent oxygen consumption per g tissue) of inguinal white adipose tissue was maximally one-fifth of interscapular brown adipose tissue, and the total quantitative contribution of all inguinal mitochondria was maximally one-third of all interscapular brown-fat mitochondria, indicating that the classical brown adipose tissue depots would still predominate in thermogenesis.

  • 11.
    Shabalina, Irina G.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Vrbacky, Marek
    Pecinova, Alena
    Kalinovich, Anastasia V.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Drahota, Zdenek
    Houstek, Josef
    Mracek, Tomas
    Cannon, Barbara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Nedergaard, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    ROS production in brown adipose tissue mitochondria: The question of UCP1-dependence2014In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Bioenergetics, ISSN 0005-2728, E-ISSN 1879-2650, Vol. 1837, no 12, p. 2017-2030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether active UCP1 can reduce ROS production in brown-fat mitochondria is presently not settled. The issue is of principal significance, as it can be seen as a proof- or disproof-of-principle concerning the ability of any protein to diminish ROS production through membrane depolarization. We therefore undertook a comprehensive investigation of the significance of UCP1 for ROS production, by comparing the ROS production in brown-fat mitochondria isolated from wildtype mice (that display membrane depolarization) or from UCP1(-/-) mice (with a high membrane potential). We tested the significance of UCP1 for glycerol-3-phosphate-supported ROS production by three methods (fluorescent dihydroethidium and the ESR probe PHH for superoxide, and fluorescent Amplex Red for hydrogen peroxide), and followed ROS production also with succinate, acyl-CoA or pyruvate as substrate. We studied the effects of the reverse electron flow inhibitor rotenone, the UCP1 activity inhibitor GDP, and the uncoupler FCCP. We also examined the effect of a physiologically induced increase in UCP1 amount. We noted GDP effects that were not UCP1-related. We conclude that only ROS production supported by exogenously added succinate was affected by the presence of active UCP1; ROS production supported by any other tested substrate (including endogenously generated succinate) was unaffected. This conclusion indicates that UCP1 is not involved in control of ROS production in brown-fat mitochondria. Extrapolation of these data to other tissues would imply that membrane depolarization may not necessarily decrease physiologically relevant ROS production.

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