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  • 1. Champoux-Larsson, Marie-France
    et al.
    Dylman, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Different measurements of bilingualism and their effect on performance on a Simon task2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Champoux-Larsson, Marie-France
    et al.
    Dylman, Alexandra S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Bilinguals’ use of semantic and prosodic cues for emotion inference in speech2019In: XIV International Symposium of Psycholinguistics: Abstracts Book, 2019, p. 80-80Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, a study by Champoux-Larsson and Dylman (2018) showed that the bilingual advantage previously found in the use of emotional prosodic cues in children to infer a speaker’s emotional state (e.g., Yow & Markman, 2011) was driven by a bias towards prosody. Namely, the higher level of bilingualism the participants in ChampouxLarsson and Dylman (2018) had, the more they had difficulty ignoring prosodic emotional cues in spoken words even when they were asked to focus on the semantics of the words. While Misono et al. (1997) found that monolingual adults rely on both semantic and prosodic cues to determine emotion in speech equally, it is not known yet whether this also is true for bilingual adults. In other words, it is unclear whether the prosodic bias found in bilingual children withstands even in adulthood for bilinguals. Thus, we present a study where adults with varying levels of bilingualism were asked to determine the emotional valence of utterances based on the participant’s general impression (i.e., without specifying which cue to use), based on the utterance’s emotional prosody or based on its semantic content. The spoken words’ semantics was positive, negative or neutral and the words were uttered with either a congruent emotional prosody or with an incongruent emotional prosody. Data is currently being prepared for analysis and results will be available within the coming weeks.

  • 3.
    Dylman, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Det flerspråkiga samhällets enspråkiga norm2019In: Dyslexi, ISSN 1401-2480, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Dylman, Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Blomqvist, Emilia
    Champoux-Larsson, Marie-France
    Reading habits and emotional vocabulary in adolescents2020In: Educational Psychology, ISSN 0144-3410, E-ISSN 1469-5820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has found that reading increases overallvocabulary size, and that reading fiction, specifically, is associatedwith higher levels of empathy and better perspective-taking skills.The current study investigated a potential link between readinghabits and emotional vocabulary in particular, to assess whetherthe link between reading and empathy could be specificallyrelated to emotion words. A total of 415 Swedish secondary andupper secondary school students were asked to generate wordsin various emotional categories, and to report their reading habits.Generally, females produced more words than males. For allparticipants, the largest amount of words was produced in theneutral, followed by positive, then the negative category.Crucially, the frequent readers produced more emotional wordsthan the less frequent readers, suggesting that reading habits areassociated with emotional vocabulary. We discuss the implicationsof these findings for the understanding of the link between readingand emotional competence.

  • 5.
    Dylman, Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Champoux-Larsson, Marie-France
    No foreign language effect in decision making for culturally influential second languages2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report two experiments investigating the foreign language effect (FLe) for culturally influential languages. Across two experimental paradigms, we found no FLe for Swedish participants when using their second language English. This highlights the limitations of the FLe and suggests that it may not be as robust as previously thought.

  • 6.
    Dylman, Alexandra S.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Champoux-Larsson, Marie-France
    It's (not) all Greek to me: Boundaries of the foreign language effect2020In: Cognition, ISSN 0010-0277, E-ISSN 1873-7838, Vol. 196, article id 104148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report three experiments investigating the boundaries of the Foreign Language effect in decision making (examining both risk aversion and moral dilemmas), when the foreign language is culturally influential, or when there is high linguistic similarity between the native language and the foreign language. Specifically, we found no Foreign Language effect in the Asian disease problem (Experiment 1a) or the footbridge moral dilemma (Experiment 2a) in Swedish-English bilinguals, but did find a Foreign Language effect for both these tasks in Swedish-French bilinguals (Experiments 1b and 2b). Additionally, we found no Foreign Language effect for moral dilemmas when the language pair was linguistically similar by testing Swedish-Norwegian and Norwegian-Swedish bilinguals (Experiment 3). These results indicate possible boundaries to the Foreign Language effect in decision making and propose that factors such as cultural influence and linguistic similarity diminish the Foreign Language effect.

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