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  • 1.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Ålund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Language analysis and unaccompanied minors: A Shibboleth approach?2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Åhlund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Swedish as multiparty work: Tailoring talk in a second language classroom2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation examines classroom conversations involving refugee and immigrant youth in a second language (L2) introduction program, exploring how L2 Swedish emerges as a multiparty accomplishment by both the teacher and the students. Drawing on forty hours of video-recorded Swedish L2 classroom conversations, as well as on observations and informal interviews, it focuses on talk as a form of social action. Theoretically and methodologically, the dissertation primarily combines insights from language socialization and social constructionist frameworks and detailed transcriptions informed by conversation analysis.

    Study I documents how schooled Swedish as a second language (SSL) student identities emerged as performative effects of how the students in school activities were addressed as “ethnic” students, and how they managed to handle, adopt, and contest being positioned as the Other. Study II records classroom performances and the formation of a community of practice. The analyses cover how students’ verbal improvisations (repetitions, stylizations, and laughter) and alignments to local registers authenticate SSL identities. The findings show how stylizations were important resources for metalinguistic reflections on correctness, and for the establishment of a local language ideology. Study III documents the interactional nature of classroom repair work. Detailed analyses of correction sequences and trajectories show that both the teacher and the students produced ambiguous other-corrections, illuminating the intricate multiparty work in correction trajectories.

    In brief, this dissertation illuminates multiparty aspects of classroom L2 socialization. The analyses of classroom talk show how both teacher and student investments in language competencies and local ideologies of correct Swedish or style, as well as participation and identity work, are co-constructed through participants’ tailoring of talk.

  • 3.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Corrections as multiparty accomplishments in L2 classroom conversations2015In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 30, p. 66-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research on classroom talk has had a dyadic teacher-student bias. This study documents multiparty aspects of repair work through analyses of talk in a classroom community. Drawing on 40h of video-recordings from Swedish L2 lessons in a language immersion classroom, participant contributions were analyzed as those of a party (Schegloff, 1995), rather than merely as individual contributions. The detailed analyses of correction trajectories reveal that both the teacher and the students produced exposed corrections (Jefferson, 1987) as well as embedded corrections (corrective recasts). The analyses illuminate the teacher's sustained efforts in tailoring classroom talk to the classroom community's displayed understanding and varying skills, something that involved a continuous balancing act between form-accuracy and conversational progressivity. Moreover, the analyses document student agency (e.g. vicarious responses, chorus responses and peer corrections). In moving away from a dyadic bias, this study of repair work contributes to situated analyses of classroom corrections.

  • 4.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Stylizations and alignments in a L2 classroom: Multiparty work in forming a community of practice2015In: Language & Communication, ISSN 0271-5309, E-ISSN 1873-3395, Vol. 43, p. 11-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a single-case analysis of classroom conversations, Swedish was both the target language and lingua franca. The analyses (based on a corpus of 40 h of video-recordings) document the role of stylizations and alignments in the building of a community of practice in a L2 classroom for migrant students. The analyses cover participants' perspectives as they appeared in their ways of deploying local registers, on the one hand, and standard Swedish, on the other. Stylizations and laughter were important resources for the establishment of local language ideologies. The analyses extend work on classroom performance and communities of practice, documenting in detail how a community is partly talked into being, shaped through stylizations and other alignments.

  • 5.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Constructing the Other in the "inclusive school": Paradoxical practices and identification in SSL educationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Jonsson, Rickard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Peruvian meatballs? Constructing the Other in the performance of an inclusive school2016In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 166-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Swedish schools, newly arrived refugee and immigrant students are provided with a language introductory programme, designed for integration into the mainstream school system. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork on classroom conversations in one such introductory programme, this study analyses how Swedish as second language (SSL) students are positioned and position themselves in everyday discursive practices. The participants strive to qualify for mainstream programmes through performing a ‘regular’ student identity. Although educational aim and the students’ investments coincide, in doing the inclusive school, the institution calls for the students to perform ethnicity. The student identities thus emerge in and through a cluster of performative effects of how they are addressed by the school as ‘ethnic’ students, and how they manage those very positionings. Paradoxically, an institutional construction of an inclusive school draws on a discourse of Otherness in which the student’s voices are invited but seem to be ignored.

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