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  • 1.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Atlantic crossings: Exhibiting Scandinavian-American relations in scale models and moving pictures during the mid-1910s2012In: Early Popular Visual Culture, ISSN 1746-0654, E-ISSN 1746-0662, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 345-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among the many endeavours of visualization that took place in fairs and expositions at the time of early cinema, one medium warrants closer attention than it has hitherto received: the scale model. Well suited to pedagogical ideals of overview and visual compression, the model may shed light on the specifically three-dimensional branch of exhibitory items, particularly in instances when it was used in conjunction with moving pictures. Chiefly on the basis of contemporary press sources, this essay explores two occurrences of smaller-scale farm models that were used in exhibitions in a context of multiple other media, including cinema. These instances of model culture reflect two very different aspects of Scandinavian–American relations during the mid-teens: on the one hand, a Swedish government-funded organization used the 1915 Panama–Pacific Exposition for political purposes, attempting to convince Swedish Americans to go back to Sweden and build their own small farms; on the other, a Norwegian official exposition in 1914 instead celebrated the success of Norwegian-American settlers. The essay investigates how the specific uses of the assembled media in each case articulate these aims and refract the more abstract political ideals behind them. It argues that in the media discourse surrounding these cases, the scale model was overwhelmingly favoured, at this point outshining the cinema as a perceived beacon of scientific exactitude and intuitive meaning. Perhaps for this very reason, the miniature in particular seems to have been allowed to invite affective relations with the spectator.

  • 2.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Att plocka mordets stilblommor: Dario Argentos stiliserade våldsvariationer2013In: I gränslandet: Nya perspektiv på film och modernism / [ed] Daniel Brodén, Kristoffer Noheden, Möklinta: Gidlunds förlag, 2013, p. 157-179Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Locating Inter-Scandinavian Silent Film Culture: Connections, Contentions, Configurations2013Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The thesis revisits film and film-culture history in Sweden, Denmark and Norway with a view to discourses and practices of the inter- and trans-Scandinavian in the silent era. Excluding the earliest films, but including the transition to synchronised sound, it covers the period of the 1900s to 1930 with emphasis on the 1910s and 1920s. The thesis identifies notions about the relations between the Scandinavian and the national by means of a number of case studies based on textual historical sources. As a consistent Scandinavian perspective on this period is new, the investigation substantially supplements and revises the individual national film histories of these countries. It adds missing context to national developments and makes visible border phenomena such as transnational collaborations and co-producing practices.

    The thesis finds that film production in Scandinavia in the silent era was orientated towards one of two poles, at times combined or in a state of negotiation: international economic ambitions or national cultural aspirations. The latter was frequently conceptualised as northern, Nordic and Scandinavian. ‘Scandinaviannesses’ performed when drawing on nature, folklore, literature and heritage, not least that of Norway, were employed for use in and out of Scandinavia by means of strategies of ‘double-entry book-keeping’. 

    During the period, the notion of location underwent changes from an illusory, theatrical device to an inherently meaningful entity carrying identities infused with the Scandinavian. Examining the effects of shared comprehension of language and a shared recent history of Scandinavist ideas, the thesis identifies instrumental notions of kindredness and senses of cultural proprietorship extending to the output of the neighbouring countries. These notions were mobilised selectively within film culture and motivated practical transnational collaboration from the side of the authorities as well as in trade organisations.

  • 4.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Souvenirs from the Selma Lagerlöf silent film adaptations: How ‘beautiful’ book editions and prestige cinema collaborated in Swedish visual culture around 19202012In: Scandinavica - International Journal of Scandinavian Studies, ISSN 0036-5653, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 184-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From 1917 to 1930, several of Selma Lagerlöf’s literary works that were adapted into films in Sweden were reissued in editions illustrated with film stills. The article analyses these book editions in relation to the cinema souvenir programme, placing them within the double context of Swedish publishing and cinema culture. and argueing that increased expenses associated with World War I generated this finely tuned interaction between book and film production o. Through the lens of media materiality, this particular piece of cross-media print culture questions the boundaries between visual and printed media, unveiling the connections between the ‘golden’ era of ‘quality’ film production in Sweden around the 1920s and the stable impact of Selma Lagerlöf in Sweden through continuous publication and re-publication.

  • 5.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The press cutting, film studies and the digital age2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 149-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unlike the scrapbook, the humble press cutting has never quite broken the surface in the theoretical and methodological discourses of historiography, whether for film or other kinds of histories. In today's radically changed archive-scape where old volumes of printed media are digitized by the shelf-load, the blessings and curses of the curated collection may rapidly fade from short-term memory. At the same time, this novel sense of distance towards them can prove useful for discussing the impact of the collections' provenance and bias. In tracing the press-cuttings collection in Swedish press discourse during the twentieth century, the article argues that its meaning has shifted over time, most clearly signalling status, progress and knowledge optimism in the 1940s to 1960s. Lastly, the article maps the discourse and history of cuttings at the Swedish Film Institute and suggests that the press-cutting archive is now more interesting in its entirety as collection than by virtue of its individual scraps and pieces.

  • 6.
    Bachmann, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Vindicating The Great Moment against Swedish censorship: Asta Nielsen's soulful eyes as on-screen pantomime2013In: Importing Asta Nielsen: The international film star in the making 1910–1914 / [ed] Martin Loiperdinger, Uli Jung, Bloomington, Penn.: Indiana University Press, 2013, p. 215-233Chapter in book (Other academic)
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