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  • 1.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Balancing standardization and customization in the public elderly care setting2008In: International Journal of Mass Customization, Vol. 2, no 3/4, p. 324-340Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Challenges in the early stages of quality improvement research: defining the focus and adjusting to events in the services studied2008In: Quality in Healthcare Network Anthology / [ed] Orvetveit, J, Portugal: QUIRN , 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The Emergence of Technology-based Service Systems: a Case study of a Telehealth Project in Sweden2009In: International Journal of Service Industry Management, ISSN 0956-4233, E-ISSN 1758-6704, Journal of service management, ISSN 1757-5818, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 98-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for studying the process of technology-based service system innovation from a broad perspective using an approach that elucidates the non-linear facets of this process. The framework draws on Lévy-Strauss's concept of bricolage, which implies that individuals' “making do with resources at hand,” as opposed to managerial visions, can trigger innovation. This concept is combined with the notion of technological drift and with a model of emergentism.

    Design/methodology/approach – The paper uses case study data from the Swedish elderly homecare setting.

    Findings – The findings illustrate how the emergence of technology-based care services can be triggered by an injection of energy in terms of a new technological resource being made available in an organization, proceeding as a continuous interaction between personnel repurposing and recombining resources at hand, positive and negative feedback dynamics, institutional regulations and culture-related stabilizing mechanisms.

    Research limitations/implications – New services can arise as a result of a number of efforts and events that, in isolation, might appear insignificant. Taken together, and interacting with enabling and constraining forces that promote the emergence of certain new services and prevent others, such acts and events generate unpredictable outcomes. The result may be incremental but by no means trivial innovations.

    Originality/value – The paper suggests an approach to innovation that complements conventional thinking in the new service development literature. The proposed framework can help to explain how and why certain new services emerge and why others do not in unexpected and unpredictable ways.

  • 4.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The two facets of electronic care surveillance: An exploration of the views of older people who live with monitoring devices2008In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 128-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars are increasingly questioning the notion that electronic surveillance merely constrains individuals' liberty and privacy. However, illustrations of alternative perspectives are few and there is a need for empirical research exploring the actual experience of surveilled subjects. This study, carried out in Sweden, seeks to offer a nuanced account of how senior citizens experience electronic care surveillance in relation to their privacy. It is based on in-depth interviews with 17 seniors who have participated in a telemonitoring project and who have experience of being continuously activity monitored in their own homes. The findings suggest that senior citizens can perceive electronic care surveillance as freeing and as protecting their privacy, as it enables them to continue living in their own home rather than moving to a nursing home. One individual, however, experienced a privacy violation and the surveillance service was interrupted at her request. This illustrates the importance of built-in possibilities for subjects to exit such services. In general, the study highlights that e-surveillance can be not only constraining but also enabling. Hence, it supports the view of the dual nature of surveillance. The study also illustrates the agency of the surveilled subject, extending the argument that various agents actually participate in the construction of surveillance practices. It analyzes the indirect role and responsibility of the surveilled subject, and thereby questions the traditional roles ascribed to the agents and targets of surveillance.

  • 5.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Variability as a Source of Stability: Studying Routines in the Elderly Home Care setting2008In: Human Relations, ISSN 0018-7267, E-ISSN 1741-282X, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 1617-1644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Looks at the work of care workers who support elderly people who remain in their own homes, examining the extent to which they follow the routines set out in the care plans and the extent to which they varied these.

    Design/methodology/approach - Presents case studies of two Swedish home-care providers, drawing on interviews with care managers and participant observation of visits of care workers to older people's homes. Assesses the reasons for the variation in the way that the care workers carried out their work and the impact of this variability on the overall quality of the service.

    Findings - Identifies the care plans as being sources of consistency and also variation as they could not cover all the situations that the care workers met when they visited the older people. Reports that the care workers were guided as much by what they feel was right in the individual circumstances as by the official care plans. Notes that this meant that care worker who were committed to their job offered more support than the care plan required whereas those who disliked the job offered less. Sees this as underlining the emotional-ethical dimension of this type of work and, consequently, the difficulty of predicting and controlling performance. Research limitations/ implications - Describes the research methods.

    Originality/value - Examines the factors that affect how routines are carried out.

  • 6.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Conrick, M.
    New E-Service Development in the Home Care Sector: Beyond Implementing a Radical Technology2008In: International Journal of Medical Informatics, Vol. 77, no 10, p. 679-688Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Conrick, Monya
    Visions and realities: developing ‘smart’ homes for seniors in Sweden2007In: electronic Journal of Health Informatics, ISSN 1446-4381, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The smart home concept with its vision of embedding technology in houses or apartments gained much interest during the end of the 20th and the beginning of 21st century. Although the vision remains, the enthusiasm has diminished somewhat with the one exception: senior housing. Smart homes for seniors have been touted in recent years as the means of enabling ‘aging at home’ and so relieve the pressure on health systems. This research examines the players, issues and current state of development of technology based services in the senior housing sector in Sweden. It is underpinned by the theories of development and innovation and the use of qualitative methods such as observations and in-depth interviews with a broad cross section of players in the sector. This research reveals some of the shortcomings of the approaches used in developing smart housing for the senior population. These include the focus on the technical possibilities rather than solving the every day problems of end-users, the narrow scope of projects, lack of multidisciplinary involvement and insufficient resource.

  • 8.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Lindblad, Staffan
    Innovation as emergence in healthcare: Unpacking change from within2013In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 93, p. 203-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The contemporary healthcare literature suffers from a disproportionate focus on 'given' externally created innovations, and belief in ordered, planned and well-funded implementation processes. As an alternative, the present paper highlights the potential of emergent change processes, using the continuous invention and re-invention of the Rheumatology Quality Registry in Sweden as an example. This 19 year long process, which is still ongoing, does not exhibit the sequential steps that are allegedly determinants of success in the innovation and implementation literature. Yet, it has produced system-wide improvements. We draw on more than 100 informal and formal meetings with practitioners involved in the process studied, observations, documentation analysis and quantitative registry-data. A total of 67 interviews with registry-users and external stakeholders were also performed. The dissipative structures model (complexity theory) was used to analyze the data. The studied process illustrates an ongoing, practice-driven improvement process, which was sparked by abstract and indirect energies that interacted with more concrete innovations such as new drugs. For example, participants tapped new information technologies, changing perspectives and governmental priorities to challenge current ways of working and introduce new ideas. Ideas were realized and spread through various self-organized processes that involved the re-arrangement of existing resources rather than acquisition of new resources. Taken together, these processes brought Swedish rheumatology to new levels of functioning 1992-2011. An important implication of our work is that incremental and practice-driven change processes can significantly transform care systems in the long run. Policy makers need to acknowledge and foster such ongoing innovation processes at micro-level, rather than focusing exclusively on innovations as externally created 'things' that await 'implementation'.

  • 9.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Thanem, Torkild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Värlander, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    The embodiment of unhealthy global careers among Swedish professionals2013In: Careers without Borders: Critical Perspectives / [ed] Christina Reis, Yehuda Baruch, New York: Routledge, 2013, p. 78-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Värlander, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Globalization and the Body: Global Workers’ Doings, Feelings and Coping Strategies in Everyday Work2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Värlander, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Jetset lifestyle, glamorous hotels and business class – or physical exhaustion?: Exploring the experience of traveling bodies in the global firm2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Seniors perception of telecare services: An introductory study2005In: Innovation and the Knowledge Economy: Issues, Applications, Case Studies / [ed] Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham, Amsterdam: IOS Press , 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Wikström, Solveig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The role of emotion in service evaluation: Senior citizens' assessment of long-term care services2008In: Managing Service Quality, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Wikström, Solveig
    The Role of Emotion in Service Evaluation: Senior Citizen's Assessments of Long-term Care Services2008In: Managing Service Quality, ISSN 0960-4529, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Winterstorm Värlander, Sara
    Stanford University, USA.
    The mutual constitution of sensuous and discursive understanding in scientific practice: An autoethnographic lens on academic writing2013In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 395-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The research process and production of scientific knowledge has traditionally been understood to be based on abstract analysis and intellectual capacity rather than physical and emotional resources, promoting an understanding of academic practice as a detached, non-emotional and objective activity. Lately, several researchers have bemoaned this lack of recognition of the bodiliness of our work. In this study, we attempt to address this gap by exploring and conceptualizing some of the ways in which the embodied dimensions of academic research practices are intertwined with the articulation of ideas in the writing of scientific texts. In order to pursue our aim, we draw on experiences explicated through an autoethnographic approach, including the generation of personal narratives and in-depth conversations with 18 researchers from different universities in Europe and the US. The article contributes to the sociology of science and academic literacy literature, by conceptualizing the interconnectedness between sensuous and discursive understandings in this context. With the advancement of this theoretical approach, we illuminate how scientific practice is bound up with emotional, embodied, material, social, political and institutional forces. We also challenge the dichotomy between ‘knowledge work’ or theoretical tasks on the one hand, and ‘body work’ or physical labor on the other.

  • 16.
    Essén, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    The corporeality of learning in everyday practice2008In: Accepted for presentation at the Academy of Management Meeting in Anaheim, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Yakhlef, Ali
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Essén, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Practice innovation as bodily skills: the example of elderly home care service delivery2013In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 881-903Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Heideggerian strand of organization studies has highlighted important aspects of organizational practices. Because of the emphasis of the practice-oriented approach on routine practice, researchers have taken a special interest in how innovative, improvised action arises. One of the dominant views is that innovative action is the outcome of different variations in everyday practices. Insightful though these studies are, they do not recognize the role of the body in their conceptualization. This article seeks to redress this imbalance by drawing on Merleau-Ponty's (1962) phenomenology, suggesting that the body, as a carrier of practices, is the locus of innovative action. The article proposes that innovative action emerges in our bodily expressive-responsive skilful coping mode. In illustrating this argument, we make use of case study material focusing on practices involving elderly care service provision. We show how the care workers under consideration cope with the demands of their unpredictable work by adapting their bodily expressive-responsive abilities innovatively to emerging situational calls. Practice innovation emerges as the outcome of a tension between what it makes sense for the care workers to do based on the practical intelligibility underlying their own practices, on the one hand, and bureaucratic rules and requirements inscribed in terms of economic rationality and cost-efficiency, on the other. Because bureaucratic rules are perceived as alienating and unethical, innovation would inevitably be a form of resistance. The article specifies this form of practical resistance, concluding with some implications of this approach for organization studies.

1 - 17 of 17
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