Change search
Refine search result
1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlin Sundman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Signs of sinusitis in times of urbanization in Viking Age-early Medieval Sweden2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 12, p. 4457-4465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence and possible negative impact on sinus health of living conditions in rural and urban environments in Viking Age (AD 800–1050) and Early Medieval Sweden (AD 1050–1200) is investigated. Skeletal samples from 32 rural settlements in the Mälaren Valley (AD 750–1200) and burials in the nearby proto-urban port of trade Birka (AD 750–960) are examined. Based on the diagnostic criteria for maxillary sinusitis used in earlier studies, the results show that there is no significant difference in the prevalence of signs of sinusitis between the two materials (i.e. the Mälaren Valley versus Birka). Consequently, this provides no evidence that living in a proto-urban environment had a negative impact on sinus health. However, when compared with previously studied samples from the early medieval town Sigtuna, dated to AD 970–1100, the populations of the Mälaren Valley and Birka show significantly lower frequencies of bone changes interpreted as chronic maxillary sinusitis (95%, 70% and 82% respectively). This implies that the urban environment of Sigtuna could have led to impaired sinus health. There is also a significant difference between males and females in the Birka material, in which more females (100%) than males (68%) were affected. A gender based differentiation in work tasks is suggested by this, or exposure to environmental risk factors that affect sinus health. No difference between males and females could be detected in the samples from the Mälaren Valley and Sigtuna.

  • 2. Alfsdotter, Clara
    et al.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Sandby Borg Massacre: Interpersonal Violence and the Demography of the Dead2019In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 210-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During excavations of the Iron Age ringfort of Sandby borg (ad 400–550), the remains of twenty-six unburied bodies were encountered inside and outside the buildings. The skeletons and the archaeological record indicate that after the individuals had died the ringfort was deserted. An osteological investigation and trauma analysis were conducted according to standard anthropological protocols. The osteological analysis identified only men, but individuals of all ages were represented. Eight individuals (31 per cent) showed evidence of perimortem trauma that was sharp, blunt, and penetrating, consistent with interpersonal violence. The location of the bodies and the trauma pattern appear to indicate a massacre rather than a battle. The ‘efficient trauma’ distribution (i.e. minimal but effective violence), the fact that the bodies were not manipulated, combined with the archaeological context, suggest that the perpetrators were numerous and that the assault was carried out effectively. The contemporary sociopolitical situation was seemingly turbulent and the suggested motive behind the massacre was to gain power and control.

  • 3.
    Androsjtjuk, Fedir
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Се же бысть вторы Иевъ»: реальные и библейские параллели болезни князя Владимира Васильковича.: 'It was a new Iob': Bible and other parallels to the disease of the Volynian.2007In: Ruthenica, Vol. VII, p. 243-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Arcini, Caroline
    et al.
    Price, Douglas
    Cinthio, Maria
    Drenzel, Leena
    Andersson, Mats
    Persson, Bodil
    Menander,, Hanna
    Vretemark, Maria
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hedvall, Richard
    Tagesson, Göran
    Living conditions in times of plague2015In: Environment, Society and the Black Death: An interdisciplinary approach to the late-medieval crisis in Sweden / [ed] Per Lagerås, Oxbow Books, 2015Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Economou, Christos
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Panagopoulos, Ioannis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ancient-DNA reveals an Asian type of Mycobacterium leprae in medieval Scandinavia2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 465-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy is a chronic infection of the skin and peripheral nerves caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. Its impact on human populations and societies of the past as well as its phylogeographic patterns around the world – at least in modern times – has been well documented. This slow growing bacterium has been shown to exist in distinct ‘SNP types’ that occur in relatively defined parts of the globe. The routes that the disease followed in the past are, however, still uncertain. This study of ancient-DNA typing of archaeological human remains from Sweden dated to early Medieval times provides genetic evidence that a transmission of M. leprae ‘SNP subtype’ 2G – found mainly in Asia – took or had already taken place at that time from the Middle East to Scandinavia. This finding is unique in the history of leprosy in Europe. All human specimens from this continent – both modern and ancient – that have been tested to date showed that the one responsible for the infection strains of M. leprae belong to ‘SNP type’ 3, whereas our results show that there were some European populations that were hosts to bacteria representing ‘SNP type’ 2 of the species as well.

  • 6. Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Keep your head high - Mesolithic human remains mountedon stakes in Motala, Sweden.In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Gummesson, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Keep your head high: skulls on stakes and cranial trauma in Mesolithic Sweden2018In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 92, no 361, p. 74-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The socio-cultural behaviour of Scandina-vian Mesolithic hunter-gatherers has been difficult to understand due to the dearth of sites thus far investigated. Recent excavations at Kanaljorden in Sweden, however, have revealed disarticulated human crania intentionally placed at the bottom of a former lake. The adult crania exhibited antemortem blunt force trauma patterns differentiated by sex that were probably the result of interpersonal violence; the remains of wooden stakes were recovered inside two crania, indicating that they had been mounted. Taphonomic factors suggest that the human bodies were manipulated prior to deposition. This unique site challenges our understanding of the handling of the dead during the European Mesolithic.

  • 8.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    The urban woman: on the role and identity of women in Birka2014In: Kvinner i vikingtid / [ed] Nancy L. Coleman, Nanna Løkka, Oslo: Scandinavian Academic Press, 2014, p. 187-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Price, Neil
    Günther, Torsten
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    A female Viking warrior confirmed by genomics2017In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 164, no 4, p. 853-860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The objective of this study has been to confirm the sex and the affinity of an individual buried in a well-furnished warrior grave (Bj 581) in the Viking Age town of Birka, Sweden. Previously, based on the material and historical records, the male sex has been associated with the gender of the warrior and such was the case with Bj 581. An earlier osteological classification of the individual as female was considered controversial in a historical and archaeological context. A genomic confirmation of the biological sex of the individual was considered necessary to solve the issue.

    Materials and methods

    Genome-wide sequence data was generated in order to confirm the biological sex, to support skeletal integrity, and to investigate the genetic relationship of the individual to ancient individuals as well as modern-day groups. Additionally, a strontium isotope analysis was conducted to highlight the mobility of the individual.

    Results

    The genomic results revealed the lack of a Y-chromosome and thus a female biological sex, and the mtDNA analyses support a single-individual origin of sampled elements. The genetic affinity is close to present-day North Europeans, and within Sweden to the southern and south-central region. Nevertheless, the Sr values are not conclusive as to whether she was of local or nonlocal origin.

    Discussion

    The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies.

  • 10.
    Iregren, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Wallmark, Håkan
    Sveriges landbruksuniversitet Umeå.
    Jungner, Högne
    Helsningfors universitet.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Grupe, Gisela
    universitetet i München.
    Kön, genus och status: variation i diet hos kvinnor och män i medeltida populationer i norra Europa2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, kyrkogård och befolkning / [ed] Elisabeth Iregren, Verner Alexandersen, Lars Redin, Stockholm, 2009, p. 208-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Analyser av aDNA: Nya pusselbitar till Sigtunas historia2015In: Situne Dei, ISSN 1653-8498, p. 92-94Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Body and Grave- Transitions of Identity2009In: Döda personers sällskap: Gravmaterialens identiteter och kulturella uttryck / [ed] Danielsson, I.-M., Gustin I., Larsson A., Myrberg N., Thedéen S., Stockholm: Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur , 2009, 47, p. 203-206Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Domestic Violence in the Middle Ages: An Anthropological Analysis of Sex Specific Trauma in Five Scandinavian Skeletal Materials2009In: From Ephesos to Dalecarlia. : Thoughts on Body, Space and Time in Medieval and Early Modern Europe / [ed] Regner E., von Heijne C., Kitzler Åhfeldt L., Kjellström A. &, Stockholm: Statens historiska museum , 2009, p. 145-160Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    En medeltida massgrav från Sigtuna, Sverige- en tolkning och diskussion kring ett flertal skelett med spår efter trauma.2000In: Hikuin, Vol. 27, p. 265-276Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Interpreting Violence: a bioarchaeological perspective of violence from medieval central Sweden2014In: The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict / [ed] Christopher Knüsel and Martin J. Smith, Abingdon: Routledge, 2014, p. 237-251Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    People in Transition: Life in the Mälaren Valley from an Osteological Perspective2016In: Shetland and the viking world : papers from the seventeenth Viking Congress, Lerwick / [ed] Val E. Turner, Olwyn A. Owen, Doreen J. Waugh, Lerwick: Shetland Heritage Publications, 2016, p. 197-202Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Possible Cases of Leprosy and Tuberculosis in Medieval Sigtuna, Sweden.2012In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 261-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sigtuna, Sweden, a medieval cemetery, including 227 skeletons, was analysed in 2006. On the outskirts of the churchyard, six skeletons with bone changes indicating systemic inflammatory disease were observed. Two out of three individuals with well-preserved facial bone regions displayed signs of rhinomaxillary remodelling. Four of the afflicted exhibit severe bilateral alterations of the lower legs and phalanges of the feet and concentric atrophy of the metatarsals. In addition, one of the individuals exhibited a kyphosis in the lumbar vertebrae. In a discussion about alternative diagnoses, lepromatous leprosy and tuberculosis were identified as the causes of the destructive lesions in two individuals. Though the skeletal changes of the lower legs and feet in four cases demonstrate a close resemblance to secondary lesions of leprosy, the disease could not be confirmed. The skeletal changes of the last individual were unspecific and the possible causes several, rendering diagnosis difficult. The burial locations imply that the afflicted persons belonged to a lower social stratum. Due to the significantly higher frequency of pathological changes in the cemetery compared to other cemeteries in the town, the individuals could be regarded as fellow sufferers among others with various medical conditions. The bioarchaeological identification of systemic infectious diseases of a group of individuals of this size is unique to north of Scania in Sweden, where only a few cases of leprosy and tuberculosis have previously been diagnosed. The significance of the present study is emphasised by the interconnection between the afflicted, the archaeological context and the knowledge of the medieval society in Sigtuna.

  • 18.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Spatial and Temporal Trends in New Cases of Men with Modified Teeth from Sweden (AD 750 to 1100)2014In: European Journal of Archaeology, ISSN 1461-9571, E-ISSN 1741-2722, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 45-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vikings with artificially modified teeth have previously been documented in the south-eastern parts ofScandinavia and in England. In a project dealing with life in the Mälaren Valley in Sweden duringthe period AD 750–1100, new cases of people with modified maxillary teeth were observed. Thehypothesis that the practice was entirely associated with adult men dating to the Viking Age was tested.The new cases demonstrate that the habit extended to eastern-central Sweden, including the proto-townof Birka, perhaps as early as in the middle of the eighth century. Additionally, cases from Sigtuna showthat the practice may have ended as late as the beginning of the twelfth century. A microanalysis, usinga scanning electron microscope, showed the heterogeneous character of the modifications. The affectedindividuals were all adult men, similar to previously published cases. Some of the men are associatedwith weapons and violent acts and the cases from Sigtuna were all from cemeteries with a possibleassociation with lower social strata. However, discrepancies in archaeological contexts and in the charac-teristics of the modifications suggest temporal and spatial variation in the social meaning of themodifications.

  • 19.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tangible Traces of Devotion: The Post-mortem Life of Relics2017In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 25, p. 151-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Though relics have attracted immense interest from a variety of scholars, not much attention has been paid to the practical handling of the holy corporal remains. Here, with the aim of better understanding the treatment of the bodies and relics as physical objects in Sweden during the Middle Ages, osseous materials from three different contexts were osteologically analysed. The investigation offers detailed insight into the treatment of the bones and makes it possible to distinguish three physical phases of the cult of relics. The three phases demonstrate the utilitarian administration of the bones and the fortitude of belief.

  • 20.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Taphonomy of Maritime Warfare: A Forensic Reinterpretation of Sharp Force Trauma from the 1676 Wreck of the Royal Swedish Warship Kronan2014In: Bioarchaeological and Forensic Perspectives on Violence: How Violent Death is Interpreted from Skeletal Remains / [ed] Martin D.L. & Anderson C.P., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 34-51Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    The Urban Farmer: Osteoarchaeological Analysis of Skeletons from Medieval Sigtuna Interpreted in a Socioeconomic Perspective2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At the end of the 10th century the first Swedish town Sigtuna was founded, which can be recognized as the beginning of urbanization in the Mälaren valley. Christianity was growing strong and the administrative power was probably concentrated to a few magnates gathered around a king. Though, Sigtuna played an important religious and political role, the time of prosperity was short and at the end of the 13th-early 14th century the importance of the town declined. The ambition with the present thesis has been to investigate the demography of the human skeletal material excavated in Sigtuna during the period 1983-1999. The skeletons from 528 individuals from six cemeteries dated to the end of 10th century to the early 16th century have been analysed. The material was subdivided into three chronological development phases synonymous with the establishment, the peak of prosperity and the decline of the town. Well-recognized anthropological techniques were applied together with a health index and chemical tests such as stable isotopes and trace elements. The main aims were to investigate: 1) differences in the material between contemporary inhabitants in Sigtuna, 2) differences in the material between the different chronological phases, 3) differences between the osteological results achieved from Sigtuna and results from other skeletal materials and 4) if the results can be connected to the indications of urbanization. The results showed that:

    - Some differences between contemporary cemeteries are discernable. Variations in stable isotopes suggest dietary differences between the women at different cemeteries. Furthermore, differences in age- and sex distribution, and mean stature are discernable between some of the contemporary samples and even within a cemetery. The discrepancies may be related to prevailing social structures in Sigtuna.

    - A decline in health through time is demonstrated. The negative trend is particularly marked for women. In addition demographic changes suggest an increased migration of adults to Sigtuna. The health deterioration may be connected to e.g. increased population density and an increased risk of infections.

    - In comparison with other materials the anthropological results, including the health index, suggests that the inhabitants in Sigtuna showed an urban pattern and that the quality of life, at least in the initial phase, was relatively good.

    - The sex distribution shows a generally male dominance possibly caused by selective excavations except at the oldest site without an adherent church. The uneven sex distribution may, alternatively, be a result of the urban character of Sigtuna i.e. a Christian and political administrative centre.

    The osteological results are in line with the archaeological and historical data. It is suggested that the consequences of urbanization such as immigration, deterioration of health and social ranking, implied by several osteological parameters and the chemical analysis, acted differently through the gender lines.

  • 22.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Tillsammans i evighet: Osteologiska aspekter på flerpersonsgravar i Sigtuna2010In: Sigtuna Dei  , Sigtuna museer , 2010, p. 127-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
     Tracing Pain: A Discussion About Identifying Suffering in Skeletal Remains2010In: Making Sense of Things: Archaeologies of sensory perceptions / [ed] Fahlander Fredrik & Kjellström Anna, PAG , 2010, p. 51-67Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Type specific features and identification of warrior graves: - the physical remains as source material after battle2009In: The Martial society. Aspects on warriors, fortifications and social change / [ed] Holmquist L & Olausson M., Stockholm: Archaeological Research Laboratory , 2009, p. 179-190Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 25.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Colosimo, Alessandra
    Karsson, Alexandra
    Kennebjörk, Josefina
    Liira, Anne-Marie
    Låås, Låås
    Vuorenmaa, Heidi
    Människorna ombord: nya osteologiska perspektiv2015In: Skeppet staden stormakten.: människor och samhälle under regalskeppet Kronans tid / [ed] Lars Einarsson, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum och Länsstyrelsen Kalmar län , 2015, p. 53-61Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Edlund, Hanna
    Lembring, Maria
    Ahlgren, Viktoria
    Allen, Marie
    An Analysis of the Alleged Skeletal Remains of Carin Göring2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12, p. e44366-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1991, treasure hunters found skeletal remains in an area close to the destroyed country residence of former Nazi leader Hermann Goring in northeastern Berlin. The remains, which were believed to belong to Carin Goring, who was buried at the site, were examined to determine whether it was possible to make a positive identification. The anthropological analysis showed that the remains come from an adult woman. The DNA analysis of several bone elements showed female sex, and a reference sample from Carin's son revealed mtDNA sequences identical to the remains. The profile has one nucleotide difference from the Cambridge reference sequence ( rCRS), the common variant 263G. A database search resulted in a frequency of this mtDNA sequence of about 10% out of more than 7,000 European haplotypes. The mtDNA sequence found in the ulna, the cranium and the reference sample is, thus, very common among Europeans. Therefore, nuclear DNA analysis was attempted. The remains as well as a sample from Carin's son were successfully analysed for the three nuclear markers TH01, D7S820 and D8S1179. The nuclear DNA analysis of the two samples revealed one shared allele for each of the three markers, supporting a mother and son relationship. This genetic information together with anthropological and historical files provides an additional piece of circumstantial evidence in our efforts to identify the remains of Carin Goring.

  • 27.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Section for Osteoarchaeology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Olofsson, Camilla
    Olson, Carina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Section for Osteoarchaeology.
    Stenbäck Lönnquist, Ulrika
    Welinder, Stig
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Barnen på Tibrandsholm2009In: Västerhus: Kapell, Kyrkogård och befolkning / [ed] Elisabeth, Iregren, Verner Alexandersen, Lars Redin, Stockholm: Kungl. Vitterhets Historie och Antikvitets Akademin , 2009, p. 236-243Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Nordqvist, Bengt
    Snäll, Annika
    Welinder, Stig
    Catching the moment: Chewing today and 10 000 years ago2010In: the SSCIP conference 2008, AmS Skrifter 23, Stavanger, 2010, p. 53-61Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Storå, Jan
    Possnert, Göran
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Dietary Patterns and Social Structures in Medieval Sigtuna, Sweden as reflected in Stable Isotope Values in Human Skeletal Remains2009In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 36, p. 2689-2699Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Kjellström, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Tesch, Sten
    Wikström, Anders
    Inhabitants of a Sacred Townscape: An Archaeological and Osteological Analysis of Skeletal Remains From Late Viking Age and Medieval Sigtuna, Sweden2005In: Acta Archaeologica, ISSN 0065-101X, E-ISSN 1600-0390, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 87-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article deals with archaeological material from excavations made from 1983 to 1999 in Sigtuna, Sweden. There was a total of 574 graves distributed between churchyards and burial grounds. Only 528 skeletons were examined due to the fact that some recorded skeletons were left in the ground or were in total decay.

  • 31.
    Krzewinska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Bäckström, Ylva
    Ingvarsson, Anne
    Kashuba, Natalija
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Rodríguez Varela, Ricardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Girdland-Flink, Linus
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Elucidating recent history by tracing genetic affinity of three 16th century miners from Sweden2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 19, p. 651-657Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Sala Silver Mine in central Sweden was an important manufacturer of silver from at least the 16th till the early 20th century, with production peaking in the 16th, mid 17th and 19th centuries. The job opportunities offered by the mine attracted people to the area resulting in the development of a small township with an associated cemetery in the vicinity of the mining center. People affiliated to the mine were buried on the cemetery for around 150 years. Written sources reveal that common criminal convicts from Sweden-Finland and war prisoners from the numerous wars fought by Sweden during the time were exploited in the mine, and some of them were likely buried on the cemetery. The cemetery has been excavated on several occasions and the recovered human remains were divided into two different groups based on burial custom, demography and biochemical results. One group was believed to contain war prisoners; the aim of this study was to produce and interpret genomic data from these individuals to test if their genetic ancestry is consistent with the hypothesis that they were non-locals. Materials: Teeth from seven different individuals were sampled for dentine. Results: Three of the analyzed teeth contained sufficient amounts of endogenous human DNA for the generation of genomic sequence data to a coverage of 0.04, 0.19 and 0.83, respectively. Discussion: The results show that despite seeming heterogeneity the three individuals grouped within the range of genetic variation of modern and contemporary Swedes, yielding no statistical support to the hypothesis that they were foreign captives. However, due to the lack of contemporary or modern Danish genomic data we cannot refute these individuals originated in Denmark which was suggested as one of possible sources of the 17th century Swedish prisoners of war.

  • 32.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Günther, Torsten
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Yaka, Reyhan
    Kılınç, Gülşah Merve
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Somel, Mehmet
    Sobrado, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Evans, Jane
    Knipper, Conine
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town2018In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, no 17, p. 2730-2738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

  • 33.
    Linderholm, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of a medieval skeletal sample indicative of systemic disease from Sigtuna Sweden2011In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 925-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sigtuna, Sweden, several medieval cemeteries have been excavated, from which approximately 800 skeletons have been excavated and analysed. Archaeological finds and anthropological analyses have exposed social differences between the cemeteries. Stable isotope analyses have shown that the inhabitants of the town consumed a mixed diet. Significant differences in dietary patterns between the cemeteries may be related to social stratification. In the outskirts of a churchyard excavated in 2006, bone changes showing systemic inflammatory disease indicative of leprosy were observed in six individuals. The burial location suggests that the affected belonged to a lower social stratum. Bone samples were taken from these six individuals, 19 other human skeletons and five animals from the same cemetery for analysis of the stable isotope composition of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S). The results showed no significant differences in delta(13)C and delta(15)N values between the groups, i.e. the seemingly healthy humans and the humans affected by severe inflammatory disease appear to have had similar diets. Nor was a significant difference observed in delta(34)S data between the six affected individuals and the rest of the sample, implying that no difference in origins could be observed between the two groups studied. However, a comparison between the present study and the previous analysis resulted in significant differences in carbon values. Based on the results obtained in this investigation it is suggested that if a dietary difference existed between people in the outskirts of a cemetery (for example those suffering from leprosy) and people buried in higher ranked regions, it was not a difference in food source but rather in other parameters. Instead dietary differences and possibly social variations are demonstrated between cemeteries. The results from the present study highlight the hierarchical arrangements of social classes in the early medieval society.

  • 34.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Wikström, Anders
    Sigtuna museum.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    S:ta Gertrud 3, Sigtuna, 2008: Rapport arkeologisk förundersökning2009Report (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Molnar, Petra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Skeletal Evidence of Health, Disease and Activity in two Swedish PopulationsIn: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 36. Nilsson, Martina
    et al.
    Possnert, Göran
    Edlund, Hanna
    Budowle, Bruce
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Allén, Marie
    Analysis of the Putative Remains of a European Patron Saint-St. Birgitta2010In: PLOS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, no 2, p. e8986-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Saint Birgitta (Saint Bridget of Sweden) lived between 1303 and 1373 and was designated one of Europe's six patron saints by the Pope in 1999. According to legend, the skulls of St. Birgitta and her daughter Katarina are maintained in a relic shrine in Vadstena abbey, mid Sweden. The origin of the two skulls was assessed first by analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to confirm a maternal relationship. The results of this analysis displayed several differences between the two individuals, thus supporting an interpretation of the two skulls not being individuals that are maternally related. Because the efficiency of PCR amplification and quantity of DNA suggested a different amount of degradation and possibly a very different age for each of the skulls, an orthogonal procedure, radiocarbon dating, was performed. The radiocarbon dating results suggest an age difference of at least 200 years and neither of the dating results coincides with the period St. Birgitta or her daughter Katarina lived. The relic, thought to originate from St. Birgitta, has an age corresponding to the 13(th) century (1215-1270 cal AD, 2 sigma confidence), which is older than expected. Thus, the two different analyses are consistent in questioning the authenticity of either of the human skulls maintained in the Vadstena relic shrine being that of St. Birgitta. Of course there are limitations when interpreting the data of any ancient biological materials and these must be considered for a final decision on the authenticity of the remains.

  • 37. Niskanen, Markku
    et al.
    Maijanen, Heli
    Juho-Antti, Junno
    Niinimäki, Sirpa
    Salmi, Anna-Kaisa
    Vilkama, Rosa
    Väre, Tiina
    Salo, Kati
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molnar, Petra
    Scandinavia and Finland2018In: Skeletal Variation and Adaptation in Europeans: Upper Paleolithic to the Twentieth Century / [ed] Christopher B. Ruff., Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2018, p. 355-396Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter focuses on Scandinavia, Finland, and adjacent regions of Northwest Russia (Karelia and the Kola Peninsula). Urbanization commenced relatively late in Scandinavia and Finland. The chapter examines temporal trends in body size and shape within Scandinavia and Finland across all time periods, followed by comparisons with other Europeans as well as other comparisons dealing with the Neolithic period Pitted Ware culture (PWC foragers), urban‐rural differences, and sexual dimorphism. The Neolithic PWC foragers are more similar to the Mesolithic foragers than to the Neolithic farmers in relative long bone bending strength. The PWC are a special case because, although foragers, they lived during the Scandinavian Middle Neolithic and were contemporary with Neolithic farmers. The chapter presents comparisons between Scandinavians and other Europeans in size‐standardized cross‐sectional properties for femoral A‐P and M‐L bending strengths, and torsional/average bending strengths of right and left humeri.

  • 38. Price, Neil
    et al.
    Hedenstierna-Jonson, Charlotte
    Zachrisson, Torun
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Günther, Torsten
    Sobrado, Verónica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Viking warrior women? Reassessing Birka chamber grave Bj.5812019In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 93, no 367, p. 181-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The warrior woman has long been part of the Viking image, with a pedigree that extends from the Valkyries of Old Norse prose and poetry to modern media entertainment. Until recently, however, actual Viking Age evidence for such individuals has been sparse. This article addresses research showing that the individual buried at Birka in an ‘archetypal’ high-status warrior grave—always assumed to be male since its excavation in 1878—is, in fact, biologically female. Publication, in 2017, of the genomic data led to unprecedented public debate about this individual. Here, the authors address in detail the interpretation of the burial, discussing source-critical issues and parallels.

  • 39. Schuenemann, Verena J.
    et al.
    Singh, Pushpendra
    Mendum, Thomas A.
    Krause-Kyora, Ben
    Jaeger, Guenter
    Bos, Kirsten I.
    Herbig, Alexander
    Economou, Christos
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Benjak, Andrej
    Busso, Philippe
    Nebel, Almut
    Boldsen, Jesper L.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wu, Huihai
    Stewart, Graham R.
    Taylor, G. Michael
    Bauer, Peter
    Lee, Oona Y. -C.
    Wu, Houdini H. T.
    Minnikin, David E.
    Besra, Gurdyal S.
    Tucker, Katie
    Roffey, Simon
    Sow, Samba O.
    Cole, Stewart T.
    Nieselt, Kay
    Krause, Johannes
    Genome-Wide Comparison of Medieval and Modern Mycobacterium leprae2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 341, no 6142, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Leprosy was endemic in Europe until the Middle Ages. Using DNA array capture, we have obtained genome sequences of Mycobacterium leprae from skeletons of five medieval leprosy cases from the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Denmark. In one case, the DNA was so well preserved that full de novo assembly of the ancient bacterial genome could be achieved through shotgun sequencing alone. The ancient M. leprae sequences were compared with those of 11 modern strains, representing diverse genotypes and geographic origins. The comparisons revealed remarkable genomic conservation during the past 1000 years, a European origin for leprosy in the Americas, and the presence of an M. leprae genotype in medieval Europe now commonly associated with the Middle East. The exceptional preservation of M. leprae biomarkers, both DNA and mycolic acids, in ancient skeletons has major implications for palaeomicrobiology and human pathogen evolution.

  • 40. Steckel, Richard H.
    et al.
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Measuring Community Health using Skeletal Remains: A Health Index for Europe2018In: The Backbone of Europe: Health, Diet, Work and Violence over Two Millennia / [ed] Richard H. Steckel, Clark Spencer Larsen, Charlotte A. Roberts, Joerg Baten, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 52-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 41. Sten, Sabine
    et al.
    Lovén, Christian
    Kjellström, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Vretemark, Maria
    Hongslo Vala, Cecilie
    Ljunggren, Östen
    Fjällström, Markus
    Shalabi, Adel
    Duvernoy, Olov
    Segelsjö, Monica
    Malmström, Helena
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Erik den heliges skelett2016In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 111, no 1, p. 27-40Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Saint Erik was King of Sweden for a few years up to 1160, when he was killed. A skeleton attributed to him is kept in Uppsala Cathedral. It underwent sci­entific reappraisal in 2014. The analyses included computer tomography, X­ray absorptiometry, isotope analysis and DNA sampling. Radiocarbon con­firms the alleged age of the bones. They belong to a 35–40­year­old man inexcellent physical shape. The many wounds that he received in connectionwith his death fit surprisingly well with the saint's legend, whose preservedversion was written 130 years after the event.

  • 42.
    Zachrisson, Torun
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ljung, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Anna, Kjellström
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Skärningspunkt Sigtuna – en första presentation av ett forskningsprojekt2017In: Situne Dei: årsskrift för Sigtunaforskning, ISSN 2002-4215, p. 52-63Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a new research project: Skärningspunkt Sigtuna – de första människorna i Sveriges äldsta stad (Intersection Sigtuna – the first inhabitants of Sweden’s oldest town), which runs from 2017 to 2020 and is sponsored by  the Swedish Research Council. The project aims to understand cultural transformation in the town’s earliest periods by studying the people who lived and died there. The main source material comprises c. 330 excavated graves dating from the town’s foundation in AD 970/80 until AD 1100. These derive both from five early churchyards as well as so-called “graveyards” (Sw. gravgård) – where individuals were buried in accordance with Christian practice, but not in the proximity of a church building. These early “graveyards” are unique to Scandinavia, but the phenomenon has yet to be subjected to in-depth analysis. Different kinds of burial grounds were partly in use simultaneously in Sigtuna and it is unclear how the interred individuals relate to one another, or what kind of social, cultural and religious communities they represent.

    The project combines archaeological and osteological data with regard to burial-place topography and location, burial custom including grave goods and relation to rune-inscribed stone monuments, isotopic analysis and ancient DNA-analysis of selected individuals. Sigtuna’s material culture in general indicates that it was a cosmopolitan town. The project will extend our knowledge in this regard by focusing on the backgrounds of the  first generations of town dwellers. Our main objective is to understand urbanization, migration, cultural interaction between groups and individuals, early church organization, networks and transnational relations.

1 - 42 of 42
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf