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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Department of child and youth studies2014In: Faculty of social sciences, Stockholm University 1964 - 2014 / [ed] Gudrun Dahl and Mats Danielsson, Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences , 2014, p. 27-43Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Family therapy and accountability2012In: Journal of Applied Linguistics and Professional Practice, ISSN 2040-3658, E-ISSN 2040-3666, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 193-212Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Cederborg, Ann-christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Att intervjua barn: - vägledning för socialsekreterare2010 (ed. 2)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Att lyssna på barn och ungdomar2014In: Barnperspektiv i socialtjänstens arbete / [ed] Ann-Christin Cederborg, Malmö: Gleerup , 2014, 1, p. 141-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Barnperspektiv i myndighetsutövning2012In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 1-2, p. 21p. 6-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Barnperspektiv i socialtjänstens arbete2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Children’s Right to be Heard from Their Unique Perspectives2015In: Child-Friendly Justice: a Quarter of a Century with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child / [ed] Said Mahmoudi, Pernilla Leviner, Anna Kaldal, Katrin Lainpelto, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 73-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kränkningar och trakasserier i skolan2014In: Barnrätt / [ed] Ann-Christin Cederborg & Wiveka Warnling Nerep, Stockholm: Norstedts Juridik AB, 2014, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Repetition of contaminating question types when children and youths with intellectual disabilities are interviewed.2009Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Utsatta barn och ungdomar2014In: Barnperspektiv i socialtjänstens arbete / [ed] Ann-Christin Cederborg, Malmö: Gleerup , 2014, 1, p. 49-69Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Young children's play: a matter of advanced strategies among peers2018In: Early Child Development and Care, ISSN 0300-4430, E-ISSN 1476-8275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how 3–5 year-old children negotiate participation rights during peer play in a preschool in Sweden. The interest is on how they build relations moment-by-moment. I specifically analyze how they negotiate participation rights with a focus on how they include and exclude each other in the ongoing activity. This is an ethnographic study, and the method is inspired by conversation analysis where the verbal and non-verbal interaction is studied sequentially. The findings are that even very young children are capable of advanced social acts when playing together. Such capacities may include face-threatening acts but also solidarity towards one or more participants. It is important that face-threatening strategies are recognized and addressed as soon as possible because children can need help to find alternative ways to behave when in conflict with one another. Otherwise there is a risk that such strategies, when repeated, cause harm to those children exposed.

  • 12.
    Cederborg, Ann-christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Alm, Charlotta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Da Silva Nises, Djaildes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lamb, Michael
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology Faculty of Politics, Psychology, Sociology, and International Studies University of Cambridge Cambridge CB2 3RQ, United Kingdom.
    Investigative interviewing of alleged children: an evaluation of a new training program for police officers2011In: 4th Interantional Congress on Psychology and Law. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Psychology Law and Society, Miami, USA, Mars 2-5 2011., 2011, p. 24-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This evaluation focuses on the developing interviewing skills of 103 Swedish police officers who participated in six different courses during the years 2007-2010 built around the NICHD Protocol (Lamb et al., 2008) and the PEACE model (Milne & Bull, 1999). The teaching was interdiciplinary, spanning development psychology, investigative interviewing and law. Most lectures emphasised the attainment of best possible interveiw pracitices. After training, the police officers reduced their use of option-posing questions by two thirds and tripled their use of invitations.

  • 13.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lima da Silva Nises, Djaildes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Lamb, Michael. E
    Investigative interviewing of alleged child abuse victims: an evaluation of a new training programme for investigative interviewers2013In: Police Practice & Research, ISSN 1561-4263, E-ISSN 1477-271X, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 242-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This evaluation focused on the developing interviewing skills of 104 active crimeinvestigators in Sweden who participated in six different half-year courses between 2007 and 2010. The courses emphasised a combined model of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Protocol and the PEACE model of investigative interviewing. The teaching was interdisciplinary. The evaluation involved interviews of 208 children, most of whom were suspected victims of physical abuse. The investigators used two-thirds fewer option-posing questions and three times as many invitations after training as they did before training. These data show that the training was very effective in shaping the interviewers behaviour into better compliance with internationally recognised guidelines.

  • 14.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    H. Gumpert, Clara
    Larsson Abbad, G
    Att intervjua barn med intellektuella och neuropsykiatriska funktionshinder.2009Book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Hultman, Elin
    Fählt-Magnusson, Karin
    Living with children who have Celiac Disease: A parental Perspective2012In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 484-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study explores how a child’s celiac disease (CD) influences the daily life of families because such knowledge can enhance the understanding of how to support family adjustment to a gluten-free diet (GFD).

    Method: We used an interpretative phenomenological approach (IPA), interviewing 20 parents of 14 children diagnosed with celiac disease about their individual thoughts and beliefs.

    Results: Once parents know, especially when their children are young, they seem to have the capacity to rapidly adapt to GFD, mainly because they notice how quickly their children recover. Parents may have problems controlling how staff at day-care and at school complies with their information about a GFD.

    Conclusions: To ensure that children with CD are given a GFD at daycare and school, it is necessary for municipalities to educate staff about the disease and to give them the prerequisites for serving a GFD.  There is also a need of early identification of children who may have CD. When parents express their worries, not just at the hospital but also at the well-baby clinic and primary care units, supporting treatment could prevent children from suffering from inappropriate food.

  • 16.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköpings Universitet, Linköping.
    LaRooy, David
    Scottish Institute for Policing Research, University of Abertay, United Kingdom.
    The quality of details when children and youths with intellectual disabilities are interviewed about their abuse experiences2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question for this study is to further understand how children and youths with intellectual disabilities (IDs) elicit central and peripheral details when interviewed about their abuse experiences. Through a quantitative method we examined the police officers first formal investigative interview with 32 children and youths with IDs. We analysed their elicited details of abuse in relation to type of question asked. The findings are that few invitations and a large number of option-posing questions were asked. The children and youths tended to agree with option-posing and suggestive statements but were able to report qualitatively strong and important information about their abuse experiences without the “help” from possible contaminating question types.  Even if the sample was retrospective, ‘diagnosis’ of intellectual disability was made from examination of the case notes, and consisted of a wide range of disabilities as well as a wide range of age this study indicates that police officers need to provide children and youths with IDs greater opportunity to report details from invitations. If they are not developing their responses from invitations they should be asked open directive questions because that may facilitate their elicitation of both central and peripheral information.

     

  • 17.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Hultman, Elin
    Linköping Universitet.
    LaRooy, David
    University of Abertay/Dundee.
    The quality of details when children with intellectual disabilities are eye witnesses.2010In: / [ed] American Psychology Law and Society, APLS , 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We do not know enough about how children and youths with intellectual disabilities are able to describe their experiences of abuse in real forensic interviews. Thus, this was the focus of the present study. We explored the quality of details when 33 children and youths with intellectual disabilities were interviewed about their abuse experiences. Their chronological ages were between 5.3 and 19.1 years (M = 12.1 years) when the last incident of abuse occurred. Unfortunately few invitations and a large number of leading and directive questions were asked. However, the invitations elicited much more central and peripheral information compared to any other question type. The children also to a large extent disagreed to leading and suggestive statements.

  • 18.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Keselman, O
    Lamb, M.E
    Dahlström, Ö
    Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews:: What do they say and what happends to their responses?2009In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Keselman, O
    Linell, P
    "That is not necessary for you to know!": Negotiation of participation status of unaccompanied children in interpreter-mediated asylum hearings.2009In: Interpreting, ISSN 1384-6647, E-ISSN 1569-982XArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Ringmar Sylwander, Kim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Blom, Karen Ann
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Research Expanding Current Understandings of Bullying in Sweden2016In: Pensamiento Psicológico, ISSN 1657-8961, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the on-going research on the phenomenon of bullying in the Department of Child andYouth Studies at Stockholm University. The paper describes the reasons, and how to contribute with anunderstanding of bullying as a social group phenomenon, and specifically focuses on inductive ethnographicand cyberethnographic approaches toward peer-to-peer interactions in schools, preschools and on theInternet. The understanding of this phenomenon is based on a Swedish interdisciplinary approach whichincludes children’s perspectives. The objective is to explore bullying as a complex social group phenomenonwhich allows for a focus on the process of bullying, thus creating an opportunity for the enhancement of theunderstanding of inter- and intra-connected actions and perspectives. This article is intended to contribute toa discussion on a broadening of the conceptualization of the phenomenon of bullying.

  • 21.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Warnling-Nerep, Wiveka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Barnrätt2014 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Legislators’ perceptions of unaccompanied children seeking asylum2015In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to explore how individual legislators perceive unaccompanied minors seeking asylum, their life situation, needs and best interests.

    Design/methodology/approach– The total number of participants were 15. Thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) was used in order to identify and analyze patterns in the interview data. The authors focused on their responses to the questions about the best interest of the child in migration policy and practice, and how this principle was related to unaccompanied children seeking asylum.

    Findings– The main finding is that chronological age becomes a key sign for how legislators understand the life situation, needs and best interests of unaccompanied children. Also, the findings from this study suggest that the moralizing welfare ideology of the past is still present in political discourse and social planning, construing unaccompanied minors as an ambivalent category between civilization and savagery. The findings from this study indicate that legislators enact reforms of importance for unaccompanied children without considering them as agents of their own future, with their own motives and reasons to seek asylum.

    Practical implications– The findings from this study indicate a need to adapt the understanding of the existing Aliens Act (SFS 2005:716) to the knowledge that unaccompanied minors need to be assessed on their own terms.

    Originality/value– This study contributes to increasing the understanding about how the subjective values of legislators may have influenced migration reform in Sweden that can be valuable to both legal and social research, as well as policy planners.

  • 23.
    Hedlund, Daniel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Zamboni, Mauro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Centre for Commercial Law.
    The art of the (im)possible: legislators’ experiences of the lawmaking process when reforming migration law2016In: The Theory and Practice of Legislation, ISSN 2050-8840, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 45-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We do not know enough about how legislators from different political parties make sense of their ambitions and experiences in relation to the development of asylum policy. In this study we wanted to find out how political discussions can create conditions for legislative change. The present study therefore explored how the Swedish 2005 Aliens Act and the new system for appeals and procedures (NSAP) were negotiated and perceived by 15 legislators of the parliamentary Committee on Social Insurance (COSI) that considered this new legal framework that is effective since 2006. The participants were openly interviewed about their experiences of negotiating migration policy via their committee work. The study is inspired by interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) as it can reach an understanding of how research participants’ attempt to make sense of their lived experience. First, the interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim and then independently coded by the first two authors. Thereafter they collaboratively refined the themes and sub-themes and discussed them with the third author. The overall finding is that the preceding political negotiations can be one of the reasons for unclear aims when politicians’ propose new legislation. This is because directives can consist of many divergent perspectives and considerations. The specific findings are that the period under consideration was described as dramatic and stressful with the presence of uncommon political collaboration between political parties as well as the pushing of legislation via budget negotiations. In addition, they said that the suggested changes in asylum policy and implementation were mainly based on other policy aspects, such as fiscal considerations and state-municipality relations. Participants also viewed that identified problems with asylum decision-making have not been sufficiently resolved by the new framework. Even though this study was conducted in Sweden, its findings can be relevant to other political systems in more developed countries as these states also can struggle with contradictory aims with asylum policy.

  • 24.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Magnusson, Karin Falth
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Vulnerable children's health as described in investigations of reported children2013In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether the social services weigh in health aspects, and what these may be, when investigating reported children's life situation. Information about physical and psychological health aspects for 259 children in 272 investigations was included. Overall, information about children's health was limited. Problematic emotions were the most commonly reported health aspect in the investigations, whereas suicidal thoughts, self-harm behaviour and gastrointestinal and renal diseases were mentioned least of all. A cluster analysis revealed that the low level of health information group included the largest sample of data and consisted of investigations with minimal information about children's health. The three other cluster groups, Neurological diseases and psychosomatic symptoms, Emotional health and Physical and psychological health and destructive behaviour, consisted of investigations conducted mostly according to the model called Children's Needs In Focus (BBIC, in Swedish, Barns Behov i Centrum). Although these investigations also produced limited information, they provided more than those assessed as having a low level of information about health aspects. The conclusion is that it is necessary to increase information about health aspects in investigations if social welfare systems are to be able to fulfil their ambition of supporting vulnerable children's need of health care.

  • 25. Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    How Social Workers Portray Children’s Perceptions When Constructing Their Identities2013In: International Journal of Social Science Studies, ISSN 2324-8033, E-ISSN 2324-8041, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Constructions of institutional identities are necessary when assessing children‘s needs and making intervention decisions. To be able to make holistic descriptions of children‘s identities, social workers have to listen to children‘s perceptions of themselves and their surroundings. In this study we explore how social workers construct children‘s identities when portraying the children‘s perceptions in social investigations conducted according to the BBIC model when concerns have been expressed about the children‘s health. Inspired by a discursive analytical approach, we focused on the language used. We analysed descriptions of children‘s perceptions in 35 written investigations. We found that in terms of words used, the children‘s perceptions were given greater attention than those of parents and others (e.g. teachers, doctors). When focusing on the quality of these constructions, the main patterns found were that social workers more frequently submitted non-explanatory rather than explanatory descriptions. We also found that social workers differ in the way they handle the task of reporting children‘s voices. These findings indicate that the use of the BBIC manual needs to be developed to ensure children are not just listened to and their perceptions described, but also that children are constructed as agents of their life. To obtain a holistic view of children‘s life-world, there is a need of identity descriptions that include details of how children understand their problems, what they experience as positive and what is acceptable support for them.

  • 26.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Representations of childrens voices about their health in social services arguments in support of their decision2014In: International Journal of Social Science Studies, ISSN 2324-8033, E-ISSN 2324-8041, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research points to the importance of involving children in social investigations, since their perception of their own situation and needs may differ from what others take to be the case. There is however no specific recommendation of how children’s voices should be inscribed in such investigations. This study explores if and how children’s voices are represented in the final part of the social investigations where social workers argue in support of their decision. It has a specific focus on how children’s voices about their health are included when, at the point of initiating an investigation, concerns have been raised about their physical and psychological well-being. Inspired by a social constructionist and discursive analytical approach we analyzed 60 arguments in as many social investigations. The findings are that children’s psychological-, physical health or general well- being was mentioned in 46 of the 60 argumentations. The child’s own thoughts about his or her health were represented in 12 of these 46 arguments. Instead, children’s health was mostly represented by referrals to other persons. In those 12 arguments where children’s views are presented they were reported in different ways. Their view could, for example, be sparingly reported and be used in order to confirm a previous statement or opinion. Two of the cases go more into details about what the children actually have said about their health. We conclude that if the representation of the child’s own voice is excluded it is difficult to understand if and how a children’s perspective of their health has been taken into consideration in the decision process.

  • 27.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Språkbruk i barnavårdsutredningar2014In: Barnperspektiv i socialtjänstens arbete / [ed] Ann-Christin Cederborg, Malmö: Gleerup , 2014, 1, p. 121-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Fälth Magnusson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Social workers’ assessments of children’s health when arguing for children’s needs2015In: Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, ISSN 0738-0151, E-ISSN 1573-2797, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Lindholm, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    ”What happened when you came to Sweden?": Attributing responsibility in police interviews with alleged adolescent human trafficking victims2014In: Narrative Inquiry, ISSN 1387-6740, E-ISSN 1569-9935, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 181-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depicted as someone without agency, with no free will and completely in the hands of the trafficker, the ideal trafficking victim can be seen as diametrically different from the guilty prostitute. By analysing how responsibility and victimhood are negotiated in forensic interviews with alleged adolescent trafficking victims, this article scrutinises this image by asking how victim-status is handled when questions turn to sex and prostitution and which interactive and narrative conditions, related to agency, stake and interest, apply for talk in this specific institutional setting. Our findings suggest that in order to sort out the "real" victims, the interviewer need to pull apart the two categories victim and prostitute even if there may be substantive problems with this clear-cut distinction since the categories tend to blend together. Further, talk about sex can be problematic for the interactants as it may undermine the victim narrative instead creating a subject with interests.

  • 30.
    Lindholm, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Legal assessments of victims of human trafficking for sexual purposes2016In: Behavioral sciences & the law (Print), ISSN 0735-3936, E-ISSN 1099-0798, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 218-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated how Swedish district court judges assessed child victims' credibility and the reliability of their testimony in cases of alleged human trafficking for sexual purposes. Court files from 12 different cases, involving 16 alleged child victims (aged 13–17 years old), all of them girls, were qualitatively analyzed with particular attention paid to how the judges described credibility and reliability. Results indicated that, although the judges' assessments to a large extent were based on the Swedish Supreme Court's criteria for credibility and reliability, they were applied somewhat arbitrarily and subjectively. They were also applied as if obvious and grounded on shared experiences, although their meaning was never explored. The way that credibility was assessed may also reinforce gender and victim stereotypes. Moreover, there seems to exist a confusion surrounding the credibility and reliability concepts, as they were sometimes used interchangeably despite the intention that they are two different assessments. Overall, an apparent need exists to increase judges' awareness that their subjective impressions should decrease when legitimizing judicial decisions.

  • 31.
    Lindholm, Johanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Adolescent girls exploited in the sex trade: informativeness and evasiveness in investigative interviews2015In: Police Practice & Research, ISSN 1561-4263, E-ISSN 1477-271X, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 197-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the informativeness of 24 adolescents exploited in sex trade in Sweden when they were interviewed by police officers about their experiences. The questions and responses were analysed using coding types developed for research on forensic interviews. Qualitative analyses of the questions resulting in evasive responses and the court files were also done. The findings show that the adolescents were informative yet evasive, specifically when asked open questions. Experiences of violence and interviews conducted soon after the police intervention may result in higher levels of evasiveness. Concurrently, evasiveness seems to be intimately connected to unique circumstances in each case.

  • 32.
    Ottosson, Lisa
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eastmond, Marita
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Assertions and aspirations: agency among accompanied asylum-seeking children in Sweden2017In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 426-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on asylum-seeking children tends to disregard those in parental care. In particular, little is known about children’s own perspectives. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Sweden, this article explores the ways in which accompanied children experience and seek to overcome challenges posed by asylum reception. The focus is on children’s ambition and ability to form their everyday life, given their ambiguous position of tentative emplacement. Theoretical inspiration is sought in Ortner’s ‘agency of personal projects’ and de Certeau’s concept of ‘tactics’, analysed through the prism of liminality. The study found that while some tactics aimed at avoiding situations and settings that made children uncomfortable, others involved influencing their situation through pursuing ‘personal projects’. Many children’s strivings were directed at creating ‘a normal life’ and a place for themselves in Swedish society. The findings challenge the idea that accompanied children are more protected from difficulties and responsibilities than those seeking asylum alone.

  • 33.
    Winerdal, Ulrika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindholm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The quality of question types in Swedish police interviews with young suspects of serious crimes2018In: The Police Journal, ISSN 0032-258X, E-ISSN 1740-5599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how juvenile offenders in Sweden between the age of 15 and 17 are interviewed by police officers when suspected of homicide crimes. The quality of question types was assessed in 47 authentic interviews. The findings show that the police officers used option-posing and suggestive questions most frequently and social pressure was used in three predominating ways: to confront, to challenge and to appeal for a confession. The conclusion is that the police officers’ question style to a large extent contradicts recommendations for how to interview children. There is therefore a need to develop an evidence-based interview practice for interviewing young suspects.

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