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  • 1.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Editorial2013In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 6, no 1-2, p. 5-8Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this issue we will elaborate further on the discussion about different conceptions of ‘design’. Design stems from the Latin word ‘designo’ which meant depicting. In Swedish and in English ‘design’ was historically used about maps or sketches of ships and buildings. Design then was more or less thought of as a practical device for creating an object that already existed in our minds or as intentions of God. The possibility to represent salient features of an object before it was built had many advantages in relation to constructions made in a process of trial-and-error.

  • 2.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Collaborative digital textbooks – a comparison of five different designs shaping teaching and learning2019In: Education and Information Technologies: Official Journal of the IFIP technical committee on Education, ISSN 1360-2357, E-ISSN 1573-7608, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 2909-2941Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaborative Digital Text Books (cDTB) are emerging artifacts in Swedish schools, combining the quality assured content of traditional paper and digital text books with affordances for multimodal representation of knowledge, differentiated instruction, communication, collaboration, documentation and with varying learning activities. cDTB are meant to cover the content of the curriculum and provide a consistent learning environment. We analyzed and compared design features in five brands on the market 2017. The analytic comparison indicated that the studied cDTB are built on differing notions of how knowledge is represented as well as on how learners and teachers were supposed to engage with the content. The analysis revealed three types of cDTB distinguished by the way the information and social artifacts are designed. Type 1 resembles a traditional text book with limited multimodal representations of content, tools for working with the content, and tools for communication. Type 2, conversely, is rich in all these aspects but still rely on mainly pre-fabricated content. Type 3 takes a radical approach to content production and leaves it completely up to teachers to produce and share content. The result suggests three very different roles and levels of influence for the cDTB users. Regarding content, the study shows that cDTB are more versatile and quality confirmed learning environments in comparison with: digital “book in a box”; learning designs employing scattered digital resources that are not quality assured; and various digital tools that have no clear connection with the curriculum. The paper contributes to practice with the understanding that before starting to use cDTB there is a need to grasp that the choice of digital learning environment is a choice among very different designs.

  • 3.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Selander, Staffan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Editorial2011In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A system of knowledge representation, especially when used in educational settings, both configures the understanding of the phenomenon being represented and designs the communicative setting, in terms of patterns of interaction and assessment practices. The “fixedness” of materialised representations imposes a particular recognised reading path, and a voice of authority defines and delimits the characteristics of the phenomena.

  • 4.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Åkerfeldt, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    A ‘moving’ field - Critical issues in the production, analysis and representation of multimodal empirical material in the field of educationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Möten och metaforer2008In: Design för lärande, 2008, p. 143-157Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Selander, StaffanStockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Design för lärande2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    Att skriva tillsammans2006In: Uppsatsens mystik -: om konsten att skriva uppsats och examensarbete, Hallgren & Fallgren, Uppsala , 2006, p. 155-166Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    Interaktion i musikundervisning2006In: Resultatdialog 2006: Forskning inom utbildningsvetenskap, Vetenskapsrådet, Stockholm , 2006, p. 179-193Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    Kartan och terrängen: Didaktikens två ansikten - som tradition och kritisk vetenskap2005In: Didaktikens Forum, ISSN 1652-2583, Vol. årgång 2, no 3, p. 27-46Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, The Stockholm Institute of Education, Department of Curriculum Studies and Communication(LHS).
    Multimodality and designs for learning2006In: In Proceedings from the second Nordic conference on multimodal communication Gothenburg papers in theoretical linguistics 92: Gothenburg papers in theoretical linguistics 92, Department of Linguistics, Göteborg University , 2006, p. 273-282Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    West, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Musikundervisning som text2008In: Nordisk musikkpedagogisk forskning: Årbok, ISSN 1504-5021, Vol. 10, p. 73-96Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Selander, Staffan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Design för lärande2010 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Selander, Staffan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Design och meningsskapande: - en inledning2008In: Design för lärande, Norstedts Akademiska Förlag, Stockholm , 2008, p. 13-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    West, Tore
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Design för lärande i musik2010Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    West, Tore
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Kempe, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Didactic Science and Early Childhood Education.
    Musical transformations2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scope of this presentation is to apply key concepts from design theory and social semiotics in order to investigate how the design of different forms of representation in music teaching and learning shapes the semiotic configuration of tuition and the process of meaning making and learning. There are several historically developed systems for representing music, even though the printed score seems to be the most frequently used system. In fact, the printed score seems to be the general focus of attention during one-to- one situations in formal instrumental teaching. Different systems of signs and forms of representation have emerged for different settings and functions. Within the context of such systems specific signs can be interpreted to make meaning. Dissimilar systems of representations of the same phenomena – like musical notation or tablature – bring different features of the phenomena in focus and leave other aspects in the shadow. Different systems also require various interpretation strategies and affect the patterns of interaction in the social settings where they come to use.

    We analyse and compare different systems for representation of music with a particular focus on how they shape the social power relations during tuition and how they bring forward certain musical features while leaving out others. We also discuss musical literacy in relation to different types of systems for representations. The printed music score is often taken to be a perfect image of the sounding music although it requires many years of experience to understand how to interpret the score of a musical work in a specific context. Instruction books for tuition in instrumental teaching and learning seldom have a written text, and leave the student with just the printed music as a guide. A discussion will be made regarding how different systems of signs can affect students’ possibilities to learn.

  • 16.
    West, Tore
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Centrum för musikpedagogisk forskning (MPC).
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Centrum för musikpedagogisk forskning (MPC).
    Interaktion och kunskapsutveckling: en studie av frivillig musikundervisning2001Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a joint dissertation project, 11 brass instrument and guitar lessons, with 4 teachers and 21 students aged 9-35 years, were videotaped, transcribed and ana­lyzed. Two were group lessons and 9 were private lessons. The object of the pro­ject was to study how music teaching and learning can be under­stood from an institutional perspective by describing, analyzing and in­terpreting musical in­strument lessons. The lessons were viewed as social encounters in which the action of participants creates and re-creates social orders at different institutional levels, by means of communication rou­tines using speech, music and gesture.

    Data were derived from micro-ethnographic transcriptions of speech, gesture and music of a total of five hours of videotape, supplemented by text analyses of 14 method-books. The transcripts were analyzed as text from the perspective of critical discourse analysis. At the analytical level the study applied the cognitive concepts of experiencing and learning music, as well as those of educational gen­res of speech and music use. The analyzed data were interpreted and discussed from the per­spectives of interaction-theory and institution-theory.

    The results show how the music during the lessons was broken down into sepa­rate notes, as read from the score. Music was not addressed as phrases, rhythms, or melodies. Expressive qualities of music performance were not ad­dressed. The characteristics of the interaction were found to be asymmetric, with the teacher being the one controlling the definition of the situation. Student at­tempts to take initiative were ignored by teachers. This asymmetric pattern of interaction had negative consequences for students’ as well as teachers’ opportu­nities to learn. The organization of the teaching situation as well as teaching methods is discussed from the perspective of institution-theory. A major conclu­sion is that the way instrument teaching is organized leaves little room for stu­dents and teachers to discuss and reflect on the teaching process. 

  • 17.
    West, Tore
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Rostvall, Anna-Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Verkligheten och kartan (The Real World versus the Map)1999In: Finnish Journal of Music Education, ISSN 1239-3908, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 17 of 17
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
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  • Other locale
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