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  • 1.
    Andrén, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Kalmar Länsmuseum.
    Fischer, Svante
    Uppsala universitet.
    The ringfort by the sea: Archaeological geophysical prospection and excavations at Sandby borg (Öland)2014In: Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, ISSN 0342-734X, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 413-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photos have identified the presence of house foundations within several ringforts on the island of Öland, east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandby borg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. A subsequent excavation was carried out to validate the geophysical results. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially around the wall of the fort as well as of 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on other buried features within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The available evidence indicates that the ringfort was used for military purposes, or as a place of refuge in times of unrest, for a limited period of time during the late 5th century.

  • 2. Burks, Jarrod
    et al.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Bevan, Bruce
    Lightning strikes in archaeological magnetometry data: A case study from the High Bank Works site, Ohio, USA2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 256-260Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Determining whether a magnetic anomaly detected at an archaeological site has a natural or a cultural source can be quite challenging in some regions of the world because of magnetic variability related to soil development and differing rock/parent material types. Though not consistently recognized, lightning is one major source of magnetic anomalies on archaeology sites that has been consistently overlooked and misinterpreted. A case study from the high Bank Works in south-central Ohio, uSA shows the range of strike anomaly sizes, shapes, and intensities.

  • 3.
    Gustafsson, Ny Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Magnetometerutvärdering av stengrundsbebyggelse. Lyrungs 1:2 (f.d. Stånga Annex 1:1), Raä 48:1, Stånga sn, Gotland2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report covers a magnetic survey in 2011 of a monument site (settlement and fields) at Lyrungs in Stånga parish on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The survey was followed up by a control excavation of 1 m2 at one of the recorded anomalies. The finds mainly consisted of fragmented loom weights, glass tesserae

  • 4.
    Gustafsson, Ny Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tracing High-temperature Crafts: magnetometry on the Island of Gotland, Sweden2012In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 201-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gradiometer surveys have been carried at three Iron Age and early medieval sites on the island of Gotland, Sweden. Previous experiences of poorly executed magnetic surveys combined with a misconception among archaeologists that the Gotlandic sedimentary bedrock would preclude the success of any magnetic investigations on the island have, until now, prevented the extended use of the method within archaeological projects. The purpose of the present study was to test this presumption while searching for in situ buried remains of high-temperature crafts, such as metal and glass working. The location of the survey grids was guided by concentrations of previously recovered hightemperature craft finds from metal detector surveys and excavations. The results indicate that the magnetometer is a valuable tool for detecting the presence of preserved high-temperature craft structures in the Gotlandic soil. An additional result indicates that in this area the magnetometer can easily identify remains of ploughed-over Iron Age stone foundation houses and stone boundary walls. This is possible because of the prehistoric population’s preference of using glacially deposited, igneous rocks in such constructions. It can thus be concluded that the uniformly nonmagnetic character of the Gotlandic bedrock provides excellent conditions for conducting magnetic surveys.

  • 5.
    Gustafsson, Ny Björn
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Under plogdjup: Arkeologiska undersökningar inom fornlämning RAÄ 109, Linde sn, Gotland 2009 & 20102011Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Holmquist, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kungliga Vetenskapsakademiens trädgård: Stockholms stad, Raä 223, Arkeologiska undersökningar 2008, Etapp 22015Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Holmquist, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kungliga Vetenskapsakademiens trädgård: Förundersökning i form av genomgång av dumpmassor samt kartering av gravfältet RAÄ 223, Stockholms stad.2015Report (Other academic)
  • 8. Kalmring, Sven
    et al.
    Runer, Johan
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    AT HOME WITH HERIGAR: A MAGNATE'S RESIDENCE FROM THE VENDEL- TO VIKING PERIOD AT KORSHAMN, BIRKA (UPPLAND/S)2017In: Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt, ISSN 0342-734X, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 117-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In September 2016 geophysical surveys were conducted at Korshamn, as one of the main harbour bays of the island of Bjorko, situated outside the town boundaries of the Viking town of Birka. The investigation of a solitarily raised plateau at Erik Steffanssons hemland revealed the outline of a large Vendel-period house. Together with further anomalies at a one-sided terrace at Kalvhagen a whole manor complex might be seizable predating the Viking-Age settlement activities on the island. The latter dwelling is superimposed by a major Viking-Age hall connecting to a fenced special area as known from e.g. Lejre and Tisso and linked to cult activities. Both the structures and the chronological depth correlate well with the ancestral property of Birka's royal bailiff Herigar as mentioned in Rimbert's Vita Anskarii. If this assumption is correct even the whereabouts of Scandinavia's first church should be located in the immediate vicinity. The consequences of this identification cannot be overestimated: In terms of the emergence of the Viking town, its royal administration and the earliest Christian mission in Scandinavia.

  • 9. Kjellberg, Joakim
    et al.
    Qviström, Linda
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dubbla vapenhus vid Tierp, Bälinge och Alunda kyrkor? En rapport från ett forskningsprojekt2010In: Uppland, ISSN 0566-3059, p. 65-74Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet Nordliga vapenhus i Uppland genomfördes under hösten 2009 i syfte att med hjälpa av en georadarutrustning belägga förekomsten av nordliga vapenhus vid tre Uppländska kyrkor i Alunda, Tierp och Bälinge. Georadarresulten visar på ett tydligt nordligt vapenhus vid Alunda kyrka, något som även belagts vid tidigare arkeologiska undersökningar. Vid Bälinge och Tierps kyrkor påträffades osammanhängande radaranomalier som kan vara kopplade till eventuella vapenhus men dessvärre är dessa resultat inte lika tydliga som georadarresultaten från Alunda kyrka. De goda resultaten från Alunda kyrka visar dock att den icke-förstörande georadarmetoden kan vara ett mycket användbart redskap vid undersökningar av liknande strukturer i framtiden där traditionella arkeologiska undersökningsmetoder inte är lämpliga eller önskvärda.

  • 10. Martin, Rundkvist
    et al.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Geophysical Investigations on the Viking Period Platform Mound at Aska in Hagebyhöga Parish, Sweden2015In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aska hamlet in Hagebyhöga parish, Östergötland (Sweden), is famous among Viking scholars for a rich female burial under a low cairn that was excavated in 1920. The main visible archaeological feature of the site is an enormous barrow, but its contents have not been excavated. As the barrow is oval and has an extensive flat top, it has been hypothesized previously that rather than a grave superstructure, this might be an uncommonly large raised foundation for a long house. We occasionally see this type of feature at elite manorial sites from the period ad 400–1100. We have tested this idea at Aska with ground-penetrating radar, securing the clear and detailed floor plan of a post-supported hall building almost 50 m long. Its closest known architectural parallel, also sitting on a similar platform, has been excavated at Old Uppsala, the late first millennium ad political and ceremonial centre of the ancient Swedes. At Aska, it appears that we have found another such real-world correlate of the Beowulf poem's royal mead-hall Heorot, but in this case located in a smaller and less powerful polity. This all suggests a petty royal status for the owners of the Aska hall, who enjoyed connections with Scandinavia's top political elite.

  • 11.
    Rajala, Ulla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Karivieri, Arja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sorge, Elena
    Furiesi, Alessandro
    Morelli, Gianfranco
    Catanzariti, Gianluca
    The Stockholm Volterra Project: exploring a cityscape in an urban context2018In: The Archaeology of Death: Proceedings of the Seventh Conference of Italian Archaeology held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, April 16-18, 2016 / [ed] Edward Herring, Eóin O’Donoghue, Oxford: Archaeopress, 2018, p. 553-562Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Arkeologi på Kalfjället: Geofysisk och geokemisk prospektering av RAÄ 1372:1 Sorsele socken, Lappland2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report dels with geophysical and geochemical surveys of a Stone Age settlement site in the mountain tundra region of northern Sweden.

  • 13.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Askersund: Magnetometerprospektering av RAÄ 238, Askersund, Örebro län2012Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Björklinge: Georadarprospektering2016Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Drottningholms slott: Georadarprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Ekornavallen: Magnetometerprospektering2012Report (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kvarnbo - Saltvik - Åland: Teknisk rapport, Georadarmätningar2014Report (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kvarteret Skepparen Norrköping: Teknisk rapport, Georadarmätningar2013Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Linköpings slott: Georadarprospektering vid Linköpings slott, RAÄ148:1, Linköpings sn, Östergötland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Remnant echoes of the past: Archaeological geophysical prospection in Sweden2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis has been to investigate the benefits, pitfalls and possibilities of using geophysical methods in archaeological projects. This is exemplified by surveys carried out at archaeological sites in different geographical and chronological contexts. The thesis also aims at investigating the cause for the under-use of the methods in Swedish archaeology by looking at previously conducted surveys. The methods used during these surveys have been Ground-penetrating radar (GPR), magnetometer, slingram and a kappameter. The surveys in the mountain tundra region of Lapland show that magnetic susceptibility surveys is a valuable aid in discovering heaps of fire-cracked stones and when combined with magnetometry, also hearths. GPR and magnetometer surveys within the Migration Period ringfort Sandbyborg provided the spatial layout of the fort and indicated, along with results from recent excavations and metal detections, many similarities with the ringfort Eketorp II. The non-magnetic character of the sedimentary bedrock on Öland and Gotland is suitable for magnetometer surveys and the method is also highly appropriate for the detection of the remains of high-temperature crafts. GPR surveys at St. Mary’s Dominican convent in Sigtuna produced the spatial layout of the central cloister area. The investigations also show that the geology, pedology, land use and the character of commonly occurring prehistoric remains in Sweden, in certain circumstances and in certain areas, have restricted the possibility of successfully carrying out geophysical surveys. Care must therefore be taken to choose the right instrument for the survey and to tailor the sampling density of each geophysical survey, according to the character and size of the expected archaeological remains, in order to maximize their information return. To increase the use of geophysical methods in Sweden the educational opportunities, both for surveyors and professional archaeologists, need to improve.

  • 21.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Riddarholmskyrkan: Teknisk rapport. Georadarmätningar2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den 19:e april 2012 utfördes en georadarmätning mellan gravtumba A och B i Riddarholmskyrkan i Stockholm. Avsikten med undersökningen var att utröna om det fanns ett hålrum under golvet mellan de båda gravtumborna i kyrkans kor, eller om marken under golvplattan mellan gravtumborna bestod av någon typ av fyllnadsmaterial. Georadarmätningarna utfördes med ett ProEx-system från Malå Geoscience. Till utrustningen kopplades både en 800- och en 500MHz antenn. Undersökningarna utfördes i fyra separata profiler som vardera var drygt 12m långa. Profilerna drogs medvetet vidare ut över redan kända gravar för att tydliga referenser skulle finnas i det insamlade datamaterialet. Resultaten visar att tydliga reflektioner kan iakttagas då georadarantennen drogs över de redan kända gravarna i kyrkan. Det är troligt att de kraftiga reflektionerna bland annat orsakas av partiella tomrum under de gravhällar som täcker golvet i kyrkan. Reflektioner (hyperblar) från möjliga tegelmurar och kistor i några av gravarna är också synliga i data. Georadarresultaten från området mellan gravtumborna är, i jämförelse med övriga gravar, mycket annorlunda. Det indikerar att det under golvplattan mellan de båda gravtumborna inte finns något hålrum utan någon typ av fyllnadsmaterial. I fyllnadsmaterialet är det möjligt att flertalet lagergränser finns representerade, av vilka några är svagt synliga i radagramen.

  • 22.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Rinkabyholm: Teknisk rapport, Georadar- och magnetometermätningar2013Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Roma: Georadarprospektering2016Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Roma, Gotland: Magnetometerprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Runsa: Magnetometerprospektering2013Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sandbyborg: Teknisk rapport: Magnetometerprospektering av Sandbyborg, Raä 45:1 Öland, Sverige2012Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stensborg: Geofysisk och geokemisk prospektering av RAÄ 527,Grödinge socken, Södermanland2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with the results from a geophysical and geochemical prospection survey of the Stone Age site Stensborg (RAÄ 527) in Grödinge parish, Sweden

  • 28.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Söderköpings Franciskanerkonvent: Georadarprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Big Five: Mapping the subsurface of Iron Age forts on the Island of Öland, Sweden2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 521-525Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Öland in the Baltic Sea is home to several large ring-forts dated to about AD 200–700 (Fig. 1). Eighteen ring-forts are known from historical maps and records, but only 15 have been preserved. Only one of these forts, Eketorp, was subject to large-scale archaeological investigations and the fort was completely excavated in 1964–74 (Borg et al. 1976). During the excavations some 53 stone house foundations were discovered inside the fort (Fig. 2) and surveys and archaeological testing have confirmed the existence of similar foundations in at least ten other forts on the island (Fallgren 2008). Since Eketorp is the only completely excavated ring-fort, it is seen as a model for all the other Ölandic forts, despite the fact that the other forts may have held different functions. Several ring-forts are also too large for traditional archaeological excavations and as a consequence little is known about them. Many forts, at least since the beginning of the 17th century (e.g., Tegnér 2008: 44), were subject to intensive agricultural activity, which may have had a detrimental effect on the preservation of archaeological remains.“The Big Five” is a project funded by the Swedish research council and the Royal Academy of Letters History and Antiquities to use geophysical prospection methods in the investigation of five of these ring-forts: Gråborg, Vedby borg, Bårby borg, Löts borg and Svarteberga borg. The purpose of the surveys is to nuance the picture of the Ölandic forts by providing new information regarding any preserved remains buried in the forts. An underlying purpose is also to evaluate the deleterious impact of earlier agricultural activity.The forts will be surveyed using the moto-rised ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system MIRA (MALÅ imaging radar array). This sys-tem can be used to survey large areas at high speed and collect high-resolution data without affecting the buried remains below ground and has been tested successfully in Sweden before (e.g., Trinks et al. 2010; Trinks and Biwall 2011; Trinks et al. 2013). The GPR measurements will be complemented by magnetometer sur-veys in selected areas and also include mobile mapping system (MMS) documentation using the GeoTracker at Gråborg and Vedby borg (see Viberg and Larson: 396-399 in this vol-ume). The geophysical results would advance our understanding of these forts by providing information regarding their spatial layout and by identifying different activity areas. This information can be used for 3D reconstructions and provide archaeologists with detailed maps of the subsurface, which can enable future tar-geted excavations.

  • 30.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Tortuna: Georadarprospektering2015Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Umeå länsresidens och trädgård: Georadarprospektering2016Report (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Vadstena kloster: Georadarprospektering i Nunneträdgården, Munkträdgården, Kyrkogården samt Munkklostret RAÄ 17:1, Vadstena sn, Östergötland2015Report (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Berntsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeological prospection of a high altitude Neolithic site in the Arctic mountain tundra region of northern Sweden2013In: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 2579-2588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the summer of 2008 archaeological excavations and geophysical prospection surveys were carried out in the mountain tundra region of north-eastern Sweden. The investigations focused on locating settlement remains connected with a Middle Neolithic tool production site discovered by archaeologists in 2001. Magnetic susceptibility surveys using the MS2D system by Bartington Instruments and an EM38 by Geonics measuring the Inphase component of the electromagnetic field were used for the prospection of measurable traces of anthropogenic activity and structures such as hearths and middens within the estimated settlement area. Soil samples for phosphate analysis were also collected and analysed using a field analysis method developed by Merck. The magnetic susceptibility measurements successfully located a waste heap containing fire-cracked stones and refuse from a seasonal settlement. The results of the survey were confirmed by subsequent archaeological excavations, which also revealed a piece of resin with the imprint of a human tooth. One additional piece of resin dated the site to 3340-3100 BC. The soil phosphate analysis showed slightly increased values over the central part of the site and over the heap of fire-cracked stones. Comparison between the MS2D and EM38 measurements revealed a weak impact of the bedrock on the results, indicating a potential for the applicability of magnetic surveys to this specific type of environment. Future geophysical archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region could benefit from a combined approach using high-resolution magnetometry and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  • 34.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Berntsson, Annika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeological Prospection of a High Altitude Neolithic Site in the Arctic Mountain Tundra Region of Northern SwedenIn: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The project Arctic Sweden initiated during the International Polar Year (2007-2008) was aimed at investigating aspects of the natural and cultural environment in this area. During the summer of 2008 archaeological excavations and geophysical prospection surveys were carried out in the mountain tundra region of north-western Sweden. The investigations focused on locating settlement remains connected with a Middle Neolithic tool production site discovered by archaeologists in 2001. Magnetic susceptibility surveys using the MS2D system by Bartington Instruments and an EM38 by Geonics measuring the Inphase component of the electromagnetic field were used for the prospection of measureable traces of anthropogenic activity and structures such as hearths and middens within the estimated settlement area. Soil samples for phosphate analysis were also collected and analysed using a field analysis method developed by Merck. The magnetic susceptibility measurements successfully located a waste heap containing fire-cracked stones and refuse from a seasonal settlement. The results of the survey were confirmed by subsequent archaeological excavations, which also revealed a piece of resin with the imprint of a human tooth. One additional piece of resin dated the site to 3340 to 3100 BC. The soil phosphate analysis showed slightly increased values over the central part of the site and over the heap of fire-cracked stones, suggesting the applicability of the method to a mountain tundra environment. Comparison between the MS2D and EM38 measurements revealed a weak impact of the bedrock on the results, indicating a potential for the applicability of magnetic surveys to this specific type of environment. Future geophysical archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region could benefit from a combined approach using high-resolution magnetometry and magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  • 35.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Brorson Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    Meshing around: integrating ground-penetrating radar surveys andphotogrammetric documentation for the reconstruction of the spatiallayout of the church of St. Lawrence, Sigtuna, Sweden2016In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 8, p. 295-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims at providing evidence for the usefulness of combining data from both above and below the ground in order to provide a more complete understanding of an archaeological site. For this purpose a Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out next to the standing ruins of the west tower of the church of St. Lawrence in Sigtuna, Sweden. The tower ruins were also documented using photogrammetry providing an accurate 3D-model of the site. The result of the GPR survey clearly images the buried wall foundations of the church but it is only when this data is combined with the photogrammetric 3D-model of the tower ruins that the spatial layout becomes complete. The results clearly provide evidence of the benefits of using such an integrated approach. The available evidence suggests that the tower, nave and choir (with a possible apse) were constructed during the 12th century. During the 15th century the church porch was built and arches added to the nave. The building history of the church is thus rather ordinary compared to other contemporary Swedish churches and, as a consequence, it is likely that that the church was built for the city congregation.

  • 36.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gustafsson, Christer
    Burks, Jarrod
    On the interpretation of geophysical data and the suggested presence of a western moat at Gråborg on Öland2017In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 112, no 1, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2007 a magnetometer survey was carried out at the ring fort Gråborg on the Swedish island of Öland. The results were interpreted as indicating the remains of over 60 buildings, several roads, wells and a large moat outside the fort's northwestern gate. In 2011 these interpretations were severely criticised, and it was suggested that the moatlike anomaly in the geophysical data had actually been caused by a lightning strike. It was also suggested that none of the other interpreted features were actually supported by the presented magnetometry data.

    This paper presents the results of a groundpenetrating radar (GPR) survey of the same area. The GPR data were collected in 2014 using themultiantenna Malå Imaging Radar Array (MIRA) system, covering an area of approximately 3.8 ha. The results show that the ground inside and outside the fort's walls is heavily disturbed by farming. Most of the underground features visible in the data can be interpreted as drainage ditches and power cables, but a fewlinear features are identified as being of possible archaeological interest. When comparing the radar data to the buildings, roads andwells suggested in the magnetometry interpretation, no apparent correlation can be established. There is furthermore no sign of any moat in the suggested area. The GPR results therefore support the idea that this moatlike feature is indeed the remains of a lightning strike.

  • 37.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Hjulström, Björn
    Georadarundersökning i Söderköping: Sjöbodar och marknadsplats vid Tvärån, Söderköping socken och kommun, Östergötland2013Report (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Larson, Magnus
    Mobile laser scanning and 360° photography for the documentation of the Iron Age ring fort Gråborg, Öland, Sweden2015In: Archaeologia Polona: Special theme: Archaeological Prospection / [ed] Aleksandra Rzeszotarska-Nowakiewicz, 2015, Vol. 53, p. 396-399Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2014, four prehistoric ring-forts on the island of Öland, namely Gråborg, Vedby borg, Bårby borg and Löts borg, were surveyed using a motorized ground penetrating radar (GPR) system. The surveys were carried out as a part of the project “The Big Five”, financed by the Swedish research council and the Royal Academy of Letters, history and Antiquities, and included high-resolution GPR data collection, covering in total approximately 7.5 ha of land inside the forts.As a complement to the geophysical survey the remaining walls and surroundings of Gråborg and Vedby borg were surveyed with a MMS Geotracker. MMS systems are currently being used for high-resolution documentation of, for example, railroad tracks, but are also important for road planning and maintenance, asset management and for the generation of 3D city models (see Kutterer 2010: 293 ff.). It has also been tested and evaluated on archaeological sites (e.g., Stud-nicka et al. 2013). The Geotracker system had not previously been used for the documentation of archaeological remains and the survey was considered a pilot study to evaluate its advantages and disadvantages for archaeological applications.

  • 39.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Geophysical prospection and 3D documentation of archaeological remains in the city of Volterra, Tuscany, Italy: Preliminary survey report2014Report (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schultzén, Joakim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    Reconstructing the spatial layout of the church of St Lawrence Sigtuna using Ground penetrating radar and Photogrammetry2013In: Archaeological Prospection. Proceedings of the 10th International conference - Vienna. May 29th - June 2nd 2013 / [ed] Wolfgang Neubauer; Immo Trinks; Roderick B. Salisbury; Christina Einwögerer, Wien: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Trinks, Immo
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    A Review of the Use of Geophysical Archaeological Prospection in Sweden2011In: Archaeological Prospection, ISSN 1075-2196, E-ISSN 1099-0763, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While geophysical prospection for iron ores has a long history in Sweden the use of geophysical archaeological prospection has been limited compared to other countries. In this paper we discuss the likely reasons for this situation and present a brief history of geophysical prospection and in particular geophysical archaeological prospection in Sweden. The first use of different prospection methods, such as metal detection, earth resistance, magnetic, ground-penetrating radar, seismic and electro-magnetic prospection in Swedish archaeology are presented. The archaeological Iron Age sites of Uppåkra and Birka have been subject to relatively intensive prospection activity and are therefore mentioned separately. An overview of the current situation of geophysical archaeological prospection and related issues is given, and pitfalls and possibilities are discussed. The paper finishes with an outlook on possible future developments.

  • 42.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Trinks, Immo
    UV-teknik, Archaeological Excavation Department, Swedish National Heritage Board.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    A short review of the use of geophysical prospection methods in Swedish archaeology2009In: Mémoire du sol, Espace des hommes, Rennes: Groupe des méthodes pluridisciplinaires contribuant à l'archéologie , 2009, p. 375-378Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Trinks, Immo
    UV-teknik, Archaeological Excavation Department, Swedish National Heritage Board.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Archaeological prospection in the Swedish mountain tundra region2009In: Mémoire du sol, Espace des hommes, Rennes: Groupe des méthodes pluridisciplinaires contribuant à l'archéologie , 2009, p. 167-169Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with geophysical and geochemical prospection surveys at the Stone Age site RAÄ 1372 at the shores of lake Luspasjaure in the province of Lapland, Sweden. The geophysical surveys measuring electrical conductivity as well as magnetic susceptiblity of the thin soil layer at the site, revealed a waste heap consisting mainly of fire cracked stones. The fire cracked stones werre interpreted to have been used during the preparation of food.

  • 44.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Victor, Helena
    Fischer, Svante
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andrén, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeology.
    A Room with a View: Archaeological Geophysical Prospection and Excavations at Sandby ringfort, Öland, SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological investigations and clear aerial photographs have identified the presence of house foundations within several ring forts on the island of Öland, situated east of the Swedish mainland. One of them, Sandbyborg, was selected for further investigations by means of a ground-penetrating radar (GRP) and magnetometry survey. The purpose of the geophysical survey was to establish the fort’s spatial layout, to identify any internal constructions within the houses and to investigate whether the fort had multiple building phases. Targeted archaeological excavations was subsequently carried out to verify the validity of the geophysical results and to recover datable material that would enable the understanding of how Sandbyborg was chronologically related to the other ringforts of the island. This information could then be used to better understand the function of Sandbyborg. The results of the geophysical survey clearly show the presence of 36 or 37 stone foundations for houses situated radially aroundthe wall of the fort as well as 16 or 17 similar house foundations in a central building group. The geophysical results also provided information on the possible location of hearths, kilns and pits within the fort and also confirm the location of a third gate situated in the north-western part of the fort. The spatial layout and inner size of Sandbyborg is very similar to one of the other Migration Period ring forts on Öland, Eketorp II. However, there is no evidence of multiple building phases in the data from Sandbyborg. The subsequent excavations showed a very good correlation with the geophysical data. Datable finds, a 14C date from a human metatarsal found in one of the trenches and the lack of geophysical evidence of multiple building phases indicate that the ringfort was used for a limited period of time during thelate fourth century AD. Given the available evidence it is suggested that Sandbyborg primarily was used for military purposes or as a place of refuge intimes of unrest as its location in the outfields, far from arable lands, contradicts an interpretation of Sandbyborg as a fortified village, but as the evidence about the ringforts on Öland is restricted a continued use of geophysical prospection and excavations within the other forts is suggested as a means of obtaining a deeper understanding of the purpose and context of these highly interesting structures.

  • 45.
    Viberg, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wikström, Anders
    St. Mary's Dominican Convent in Sigtuna Revisited: Geophysical and archaeological investigations2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 4, p. 322-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey and an archaeological excavation of the buried remains of the Medieval Dominican convent in Sigtuna (Raä 30) produced new information on the ground plan of the convent and the condition of the buried structures remaining at the site. The site has hitherto seen surprisingly little archaeological investigations, and it is now over 30 years since the previous fieldwork. In addition to the foundation walls of the convent and adjoining structures, GPR also revealed an earlier building phase and a previously unknown lavatorium connected to the southern range. These interpretations were confirmed by excavations in September 2009. A suggestion as to the function of the various buildings, based on comparison with other convents, is offered.

  • 46. Wikström, Anders
    et al.
    Viberg, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Sigtuna Dominikanerkonvent RAÄ 30, UP, 20092010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report deals with the results from the GPR prospections and archaeological excavations performed at the Dominican Priory in Sigtuna, Sweden.

1 - 46 of 46
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