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  • 1.
    Becker, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Being there from afar: the media event relocated to the public viewing area2014In: Interactions: Studies in Communication & Culture, ISSN 1757-2681, E-ISSN 1757-269X, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 153-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the media event as re-located to public viewing areas (PVAs) erected in cities across the globe, where people gather to watch the events together live on screen. The study is based on ethnographic research carried out in PVAs located in selected cities during the 2010 FIFA World Cup and the 2012 Summer Olympics. We examine the relationships between these events, as reconstituted in these different locations through media networks, and the public’s participation via the event on screen.  The PVA emerges as a new location of experience and participation, with its own histories as a place of attraction for the local public and for visitors from afar, in what Massey (1994) would describe as an ‘intersection of local and global social relations’. The host city arena is no longer the self-evident ”centre” for this event, which has been pluralized through the complex web of media structures and the activities of participants who come to experience the event in these other, dispersed locations.

  • 2.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Mediatized interdependency: Mediated interaction between journalists and politicians on Twitter2014In: Panel 8: THE RANGE OF POLITICAL ACTORS, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of social media raises new questions concerning the relationship between journalists and politicians and between news media and political communication. A key trajectory in the relationship between news media institutions and political institutions is related to the changing practices of media production. The interconnections between journalists and politicians have been increasingly complex after the rise of political communication on and through social media platforms. Both politicians and journalists become dependent on factors that pertain to the communicative infrastructure and practices of social media. For example, communication on Twitter is characterised by high velocity, immediacy, and the public interactivity between politicians and journalists. This paper suggest that power relations between journalists and political actors are most fruitfully explored from the perspective of mediatized interdependency, where both parties are reliant on each other in order to get their work done properly. For example, the relations between politicians and journalists on social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook, could be understood as negotiation (Berkowitz, 2009) or as a struggle (Broersma et. al., 2013). However, the struggle is no longer so much about what ‘could’ be published, but about an on-going discursive battle that takes place in the digital public space. Political actors often make official statements through Twitter, where they ‘correct’ publications they consider problematic. When doing so, they become media producers, which, in turn, use journalism as source and vehicle for promoting their own agenda. Consequently, media logic in the digital era is not restricted to the ground principles of journalistic work, but to a much broader set of opportunities, available to political and commercial institutions in society as well as to the broader public. In order to empirically assess the concept of mediatized interdependency the paper draws on several examples of politicians- journalists interactivity on Twitter. 

  • 3.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Politicians as Media Producers: Current trajectories in the relation between journalists and politicians in the age of social media2015In: Journalism Practice, ISSN 1751-2786, E-ISSN 1751-2794, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 78-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of social media raises new questions concerning the relationship between journalists and politicians and between news media and politics. The increasingly complex media milieu, in which the boundaries between media producers and audiences become partly dissolved, calls for new theoretical approaches in the study of journalism. This article reassesses central theoretical arguments about the relationship between journalism, sources, politics and democracy. Drawing on a pilot study of the printed press, it explores the increased social media use among politicians in Sweden and its implications for political journalism. The article suggests that power relations between journalism and politics can be fruitfully explored from the perspective of mediatized interdependency, a perspective that acknowledges that journalists and politicians have become both actors and sources through mutual interaction in online spaces. Furthermore, it argues that social media use has expanded journalisms interest in the private life of politicians, thereby contributing to a de-politicization of politics.

  • 4.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The tweeting minister: The new(s) impact of Swedish foreign minister Carl Bildt’s use of Twitter2014In: 5th International Conference on Democracy as Idea and Practice: Workshop in Comparative Perspectives on Social Media in Political Communication / [ed] Anders Olof Larsson, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A key trajectory in the relationship between news media institutions and political institutions is related to the changing practices of media production. The interconnections between journalists and politicians have been increasingly complex after the rise of political communication on and through social media platforms. Politicians use Twitter and Facebook as communicative platforms, both in relation to private users (citizens, audiences), and in order to influence and network with news media professionals (e.g. Larsson and Moe 2012). One of the most prolific and ‘successful’ users of social media among politicians is Swedish foreign minister Carl Bildt.  This paper analyses the impact of Bildt’s twitter use on Swedish news during 2013. The study is based on a content analysis of Sweden’s six highest-circulating newspapers during the first eleven month of the year, analysing the total amount of tweets originated from Bildt that made it into the print newspapers. The study scrutinises in what news contexts tweets are used as sources, what news topics the tweets are part of, to what extent tweets pertain to the professional or personal dimension of Bildt, if the tweets are framed in positive, negative or neutral terms and the schematic ‘position’ of the tweets in the news articles. The paper argues that professional Twitter practices among high-end users normalise Twitter as a platform for journalistic practices. ‘Prominent’ users such as Carl Bildt provide news producers with easily accessed comments in a time of decreasing resources for critical inquiry, fact checking and thorough news reporting. The paper also discusses if social media could be understood as an arena where political messages and identities become increasingly marketised in relation to news production (cf. Wodak 2011). 

  • 5.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Tweeting politics: Exploring the social media interrelationship between journalism and politics in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mediatization of politics refers to a process by which media institutions become increasingly powerful actors in society, making political activities and policy making dependent on journalistic demands and media logic. This paper highlights the new interrelationships between politicians and journalists that have occurred in connection with the rise of political communication on social media platforms. Political actors, previously positioned outside the realm of media, have now incorporated social media use into their communication strategies, thus, journalists are now facing politicians in a multimodal communication environment. Whereas previous studies on Twitter have analysed news topics on Twitter, or news coverage of Twitter as a phenomenon, this paper maps some of the essential factors that can explain how and to which extent Twitter messages by Swedish politicians are used in journalistic content.

     

    Using content analysis, this paper scrutinizes the total amount of tweets originated from politicians that made it into the news, in four large daily newspapers. The study examines in what contexts Tweets are used as sources, what news topics political tweets are part of, the actors behind the tweets, the geographical aspects of the political issue, and to what extent tweets pertain to the political or personal dimensions. The paper include a theoretical framework for the study, reflections on the content analysis and the result of a pilot study that examines the impact of politicians’ tweets in news.

  • 6.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Twitter and the celebritisation of politics2014In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 518-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinctive feature of our time is the constant circulation of mediated images of celebrities, a process that has taken new directions after the rise of social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This article draws on the contention that contemporary politics is increasingly celebritised, both in terms of how politicians are folded into specific celebrity frames in the news media and in the way politicians ‘perform’ their own professional and private identities through frequent use of social media. Recently, Twitter has become an established platform for a more personal form of political communication, where politicians can influence and network with news media professionals as well as showcase images of their successful and glamorous lives.

    Drawing on examples from the prolific tweeter and Swedish minister for foreign affairs Carl Bildt we argue that the celebritisation of politics that takes place on Twitter can be conceptualised in terms of three modes of ‘performed connectivity’: public, media and celebrity connectivity respectively. As an analytical concept, performed connectivity accentuates that political communication on Twitter is increasingly performative, meaning that it exhibits the professional as well as private sides of politicians’ daily lives. The term also underlines that this performativity is intimately linked to ideas of connectivity, which create associations of status and ‘known-ness’ in the digital public space.

  • 7.
    Kautsky, Robert
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Online Methodology: Analysing News Flows of Online Journalism2008In: Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC), ISSN 1744-6708, Vol. 5, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present global media climate, speed and immediacy are increasingly prioritised characteristics of news production. As online news has developed, the idea of a single news item has been replaced by fast-changing content and new repertoires of constructing ‘Breaking News’. Whereas most research of online news has used synchronic rather than diachronic methods, this article introduces a new approach, which we choose to call Regular Interval Content Capture (RICC). The data produced by RICC enables dynamic online media texts to be studied as they are produced, edited, and changed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. In our study, the US ‘Crucial Tuesday’ primary elections serve as the empirical example. From a discourse analytical perspective, we analyse a total of 64 hours of online news flows collected from the US and International editions of CNN.com. The RICC approach allows us to find major representational differences between the two editions. Three different modes of writing, characterising different stages of CNN’s reporting, were identified.

  • 8. Nygren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Changing Norms Concerning Verification2018In: Trust in Media and Journalism: Empirical Perspectives on Ethics, Norms, Impacts and Populism in Europe / [ed] Kim Otto, Andreas Köhler, Wiesbaden: Springer, 2018, p. 39-59Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past decade, journalism has undergone dramatic changes as a result of digitalization and multi-platform news production. Online, news is no longer a static product, but a flow of liquid news packages under constant alteration. This chapter discusses how the digital news environment has influenced attitudes towards verification among journalists in Poland, Russia and Sweden. The analysis builds on a survey to 1500 journalists in these countries. Results show a strong support for verification in general, but the new liquid news environment has also created softer attitudes towards verification. Between 30–40 per cent of the journalists believe that the audience has lower demands on news published online. As many hold the view that verification of facts can be done during rather than before publication. The analysis also reveals important differences between organizational cultures and between countries. Broadcast journalists keep their old values of verification to a larger extent, and newspaper journalists seem to accept a higher amount of inaccuracy in online news. Journalists in Poland and Russia have softer attitudes towards verification than journalists in Sweden, reflecting a journalistic culture oriented towards opinions, in contrast to the Anglo-Saxon fact-oriented tradition that characterizes Swedish journalism.

  • 9.
    Roosvall, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    The Transnationalism of Cultural Journalism in Sweden: Outlooks and Introspection in the Global Era2018In: International Journal of Communication, ISSN 1932-8036, E-ISSN 1932-8036, Vol. 12, p. 1431-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural journalism is a unique and underresearched subfield of journalism. This article presents the first systematic study of Swedish cultural journalism, quantitatively mapping content from four decades, zooming in on the years 1985, 1995, 2005, and 2015. We study conceptions of the world outside Sweden during times marked by geopolitical turning points, globalization, and rapid structural transformations in the journalistic market. Employing content analysis of a representative sample from the press and public service radio, we explore geographical and scalar aspects, with a focus on political and global dimensions. Although we found evidence for Eurocentrism and domestication-staples of Western journalism overall-results show that Swedish cultural journalism was a steady conveyor of transnational narratives during all studied periods, which together with a primarily nonconflictual approach, sets cultural journalism apart from foreign news and decreases the risk of misframing in a globalized world.

  • 10.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    Europe in Transition: Transnational Television News and European Identity2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last two decades, Europe has experienced profound political transformations, resulting in new challenges for the relationship between national and transnational identities. In parallel with these changes, national media systems across the world have been put under pressure from globalization, reflected in the vast increase in the number of transnational news channels operating on the global market. This dissertation explores the news content of two transnational broadcasters, BBC World News and Euronews, and analyzes discursive interconnections between political transformations and collective identity in news reporting. The thesis is divided into two main parts. The initial part is devoted to news forms, and analyzes program scheduling, generic structures and thematic and geographical prioritizations, using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The analyses show that BBC World and Euronews epitomize different news outlooks. Whereas Euronews mainly focuses on news pertaining to Europe and the EU, BBC World’s content is more geographically varied. In addition, the two differ greatly concerning generic structures, which is most evident in the considerable lack of live elements in Euronews. The subsequent part consists of two case studies of political transformations in Europe: The 2004 enlargement of the EU and the ‘Orange Revolution’ in Ukraine. By using critical discourse analysis (CDA), the dissertation reveals that the channels drew upon references to history in the reporting, echoing old but well-established discursive binaries between East and West. While the EU enlargement coverage was centered on the dissolution of political differences, the reporting on the Orange Revolution involved renewed tensions between East and West in Europe. The dissertation concludes that westernization, temporalization, and references to the EU’s spatial boundaries are central discursive resources for the articulation of European identity in transnational news.

  • 11.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Great escapes from the past: Memory and identity in European transnational television news2013In: VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, ISSN 2213-0969, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 107-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last couple of decades, Europe has undergone fundamental political transformations that have challenged old stereotypes about the ‘essence’ of the European identity. This article analyses televisual narratives of the 2004 enlargement of the European Union, turning the analytical spotlight on two of Europe’s largest news broadcasters: BBC World News and Euronews. The article focuses on how Europe is remembered in the news, but also how references to the past are used to explain what Europe is today and what it might look like in the future.

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