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  • 1. Benjamin, Saija
    et al.
    Niemi, Pia-Maria
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Kallioniemi, Arto
    Lasten ja nuorten katsomusten tutkimisen eettisiä kysymyksiä2019In: Tutkimuseettisestä sääntelystä elettyyn kohtaamiseen: lasten ja nuorten tutkimuksen etiikka 2 / [ed] Niina Rutanen, Kaisa Vehkalahti, Helsinki: Nuorisotutkimusseura , 2019, p. 135-152Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2. Gearon, Liam
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Researching religious authority in education: Political theology, elites’ theory and the double nexus2018In: Power and Education, ISSN 1757-7438, E-ISSN 1757-7438, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a theoretical frame to structure methodological approaches to examining religious authority in education. It does so by examining the complex, overlapping relationship between secular and religious authority and the institutional power of education evident through responses to issues of cultural expression. The political theologies research examined ongoing tensions – accommodations, conflicts and resolutions – of religious authority with secular political systems, legal frameworks and institutions of educational replication. Through the data it became clear that education – in the broadest sense, as well as in its formal institutional structures – provided a mediating role for power exchanges between religious and political authority, which was especially evident in responses of religious leaders to issues of cultural and self-expression. Through interviews with senior religious leaders and authority figures in England – technically religious ‘elites’ – the findings provide insights into a ‘double nexus’ conceptual framework for researching religious authority in education: first, the internal nexus within religious traditions and, second, the external nexus of religious communities with secular, legal and political authority. Theoretically and methodologically, this represents a critical synthesis of political theology and elites’ theory, providing as yet underexplored possibilities for researching religious authority in education.

  • 3. Gearon, Liam
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Musaio, Marisa
    The Origins and Ends of Human Rights Education: Enduring Problematics, 1948-20182019In: Metaphysics of Human Rights 1948-2018: On the Occasion of the 70th Anniversary of the UDHR / [ed] Luca Di Donato, Elisa Grimi, Vernon Press , 2019, p. 213-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4. Kangas, Jonna
    et al.
    Harju-Luukkainen, Heidi
    Brotherus, Annu
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Gearon, Liam
    Playing to Learn in Finland: Early Childhood Curricular and Operational Context2020In: Early childhood education in the 21st century. Volume III, Policification of early childhood education / [ed] Sivanes Phillipson, Susanne Garvis, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Gearon, Liam
    Why Teach about Religions? Perspectives from Finnish Professionals2019In: Religions, ISSN 2077-1444, E-ISSN 2077-1444, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acknowledging recent research literature on professionalism and religious education across Europe, the article examines the scholars’ and senior professionals’ views on the curricula aims and objectives in religious education in Finland. Through asking the professionals’ views on the aims of RE in relation to supporting of child’s growth and development on one hand and the societal aims of RE on the other, the findings were thematically classified into the following categories. Firstly, the aims regarding the supporting of child’s growth and development were focused on literacy on religions and worldviews, increasing the understanding on oneself and others, personal growth, and the skills for global citizenship. From the societal perspective, RE was seen important for supporting the understanding as literacy, understanding as empathy, and competences for global citizenship. Finally, as regards the educational model of teaching about religions, these professionals held somewhat varied views. Some favoured an RE model based on teaching groups reflecting children’s own worldview affiliations, others supported whole-class instruction, and still others a hybrid model combining elements of both. However, the way in which the instruction is implemented and the position from which religions are examined in education were perceived to be in a key role in this, whatever the formal structures for instruction.

  • 6.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Straarup, Jörgen
    Schihalejev, Olga
    Kallioniemi, Arto
    Vikdahl, Linda
    Theoretical and methodological perspectives to studying religious and cultural diversity in Finnish, Swedish and Estonian comprehensive schools2018In: New international studies on religions and dialogue in education / [ed] Martin Ubani, Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2018, p. 31-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7. Luodeslampi, Juha
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Kallioniemi, Arto
    Four Religious Education Teachers: Four Retrospective Career Trajectories2019In: Religions, ISSN 2077-1444, E-ISSN 2077-1444, Vol. 10, no 8, article id 474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the career paths of Finnish Religious Education (RE) teachers who were born in the 1930s, through a retrospective, self-autobiographical life history approach. The material reported here is a part of wider data of mainly written narratives (N = 62) from RE teachers who recount their career trajectories. In these career-focused life histories, the teachers outline their own professionalism as embedded in changing sociohistorical contexts, where to a great extent they tell about the active development of the school and the teaching of their particular subject to answer to the changing needs and challenges. Some teachers have, along with their teaching, also been actively involved in different communities or associations. Many of the Religious Education teachers here reflect on their career paths in relation to their profession as a teacher and often also with double qualifications as pastor trained theologians. At times, this constructs a possibility for tension between the roles of a teacher and that of a pastor, and in the perceptions of RE as a school subject and as something preached in the pulpit-some see their professionalism above all in relation to their religious life. This also includes a notable gender divide in the data, as at the time when these teachers gained their professional qualifications, it was only possible for men to be ordained in the Finnish Lutheran Church. Succeeding this, the male teachers in these data commonly have pastorhood as their first profession. For the purpose of this article, the career accounts of four teachers have been selected for further analysis, as they were perceived as telling examples of the wider material in terms of more or less typical career paths.

  • 8. Niemi, Pia-Maria
    et al.
    Benjamin, Saija
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Helsinki, Finland; University of Oxford, UK.
    Gearon, Liam
    How and Why Education Counters Ideological Extremism in Finland2018In: Religions, ISSN 2077-1444, E-ISSN 2077-1444, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intensification of radical and extremist thinking has become an international cause of concern and the fear related to terrorism has increased worldwide. Early 21st century public discourses have been correspondingly marked by hate speech and ideological propaganda spread from a variety of perspectives through the intensified presence of global social media networks. In many countries, governments have reacted to these perceived and actual threats by drafting policies and preventive programs and legal-security interventions to tackle radicalization, terrorism itself, as well as ideological extremism. Many of the current strategies point to the critical role of societal education. As a result, educational institutions have gained growing importance as platforms for different kinds of prevention protocols or counter-terrorism strategies. However, notably less attention has been paid on the consistencies of values between the aims of the educational strategies for preventing or countering ideological extremism and the core functions of education in fostering individual and societal well-being and growth. Using Finnish education as a case, this paper discusses the challenges and possibilities related to educational institutions as spaces for preventing violent extremism, with special regard to the religious and nationalistic ideologies that divert from those inherent in the national hegemony. This study highlights the need to plan counter-terrorism strategies in line with national educational policies through what we conceptualize as ‘institutional habitus’.

  • 9. Schihalejev, Olga
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Vikdahl, Linda
    Kallioniemi, Arto
    Religion and children's perceptions of bullying in multicultural schools in Estonia, Finland and Sweden2019In: Journal of Beliefs and Values, ISSN 1361-7672, E-ISSN 1469-9362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper explores children and youths' perceptions of the reasons for bullying in multicultural schools. How do their different backgrounds explain the variations in those perceptions? The questions will be answered based on data gathered from 9 to 10, 12 to 13 and 15 to 16-year-old students (N = 2781) in Estonia, Finland and Sweden. A survey and in-depth interviews were used in the study. About half of the students have been frequently or occasionally bullied. According to the data, the reasons for bullying were frequently attributed to visible external features, such as physical appearance or clothing, but also to the bullied students' choice of friends and language use. The most vulnerable students are those with a migration background, those who speak a different language at home that is not the language of the national majority, or who have been raised in more religiously observant families.

  • 10. Stevanovic, Melisa
    et al.
    Kuusisto, Arniika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Teacher Directives in Children’s Musical Instrument Instruction: Activity Context, Student Cooperation, and Institutional Priority2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 1022-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying precisely what teachers do to elicit desired changes in their students’ knowledge and skill is a long-lasting challenge of educational research. Here, we use conversation analysis to contribute to a deeper understanding of this matter by considering how Finnish-speaking instrument music teachers use directives to guide their students. Our data consist of 10 video-recorded instrument lessons (violin, piano, guitar, and ukulele). In our findings, we provide an account for the variance in the music instrument teachers’ use of six second-person directive forms in Finnish. We argue that the teachers’ choices between these directive forms are warranted by three dimensions of the participants’ conduct: (1) location of the directive within the participants’ wider activity structure, (2) degree of the student’s cooperation at the given moment, and (3) the institutional priority of action that is being called for.

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