Change search
Refine search result
1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
    The roles of shared perceptions of individual job insecurity and job insecurity climate for work- and health-related outcomes: A multilevel approach2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 422-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity - job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity - for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. It further explores the role of the workgroup - as a social context - in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data were collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions.

  • 2.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    University of Canterbury, New Zealand .
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    The Roles of Shared Perceptions of Job Insecurity and Job Insecurity Climate for Work- and Health-Related Outcomes: A Multilevel ApproachManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and to investigate the roles of two types of job insecurity – job insecurity climate and individual job insecurity – for work-related attitudes and health outcomes. We further explore the role of the workgroup – as a social context – in shaping job insecurity perceptions. Data was collected from white-collar employees in a Swedish organization, with 126 participants nested in 18 groups. The results show that 19% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions, and none of the variance in individual job insecurity perceptions, could be attributed to group membership. Further, compared to other members of their group, those perceiving a stronger job insecurity climate reported lower levels of negative self-rated health and higher burnout scores. These results imply that the workgroup is an important social context for job insecurity climate perceptions and, thus, that leaders should take job insecurity climate perceptions at the workgroup level into account.

  • 3.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating Job Insecurity Climate from a Multilevel Perspective: Its Impact on Psychological Distress, and Ill-Health Symptoms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity is a work stressor that has detrimental effects on work related attitudes, well-being and health. Job insecurity has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon. Consequentially, the focus of past research is only on personal determinants and consequences of the employee’s perception, and social/organizational factors have not been taken into account to any large extent. However, drawing on sense making theory, it can be argued that job insecurity is a social phenomenon as well. Conceptualized as job insecurity climate, job insecurity could be considered a product of the reciprocal relationship between behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and the social environment.

    The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity from a multilevel perspective and explore to what extent the variance in job insecurity perceptions is dependent on the individual, and how important the work group as a social context in shaping job insecurity perceptions. We also aim to investigate the effects of job insecurity, both climate and individual job insecurity, on job satisfaction, productivity, burnout, and subjective health. By including both individual level job insecurity and job insecurity climate perceptions in the analysis, a deeper understanding is gained of the relation between job insecurity and negative outcomes, and thus contributes to extending our knowledge about job insecurity as a work life stressor.

    Results from a pilot study of a Swedish sample using multilevel modeling showed that the work group accounts for about 5% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 2.6% of individual job insecurity perceptions. This indicates that the social context has some impact on perceptions of job insecurity. However, since the respondents in this sample perceived a very low sense of job insecurity, these results had to be replicated with another sample. Data from a second sample (N=126) were recently collected, and preliminary results show that belonging to a group accounted for 20% of the variance in job insecurity climate perceptions and 0% of the variance in perceptions of  job insecurity. These results could have implications for future studies on climate, indicating that perceptions of one’s own job insecurity do not necessarily match one’s perceptions of the job insecurity climate.

  • 4.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating job insecurity climate from a multilevel perspective: Outcomes and methodological challenges2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Job insecurity is a work stressor that has detrimental effects on work related attitudes, well being and health. In psychological research, studies on job insecurity focus on the subjective perception of insecurity and not on the objective circumstances. Job insecurity has mainly been investigated as an individual level phenomenon. Consequentially, the focus of this research is only on personal determinants and consequences of the employee’s perception, and social/organizational factors are not taken into account. Drawing on social cognitive theory, it can be argued that job insecurity is a social phenomenon as well. Conceptualized as job insecurity climate, job insecurity could be seen as a product of the reciprocal relationship between behavior, cognitive and other personal factors, and the social environment. Previous studies on job insecurity climate used aggregated individual level data from individual level job insecurity scales. However, a possible limitation of this research is that aggregating individual level data does not necessarily reflect a social climate. In this study, we measure job insecurity climate with a scale that contains organizational level referents. Thus, the study contributes to answering pressing methodological questions in research on job insecurity climate. Aim: The aim of this study is to examine job insecurity conceptualized both as a psychological climate and as an organizational climate. We also aim to investigate possible effects on work related attitudes and subjective health. Methods: The data were collected in a Swedish organization (N=1280) through online questionnaires with a response rate of 73%. The questionnaire consisted of validated scales measuring individual level perceptions of job insecurity, job insecurity climate, work related attitudes and subjective health outcomes. Analyses and results: We will perform multi-level analyses on the data set. Conclusion: Including both individual perceptions and climate in the analysis will provide a deeper understanding of the relation between job insecurity and negative outcomes, thereby contributing to deepening our knowledge about job insecurity as a work life stressor. Furthermore, comparing job insecurity conceptualized as a psychological climate with job insecurity as an organizational climate will contribute to the methodological discussion about how to best conceptualize job insecurity climate.

  • 5.
    Låstad, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Näswall, Katharina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Investigating job insecurity climate from a multilevel perspective: Outcomes and methodological challenges2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Concentration requirements modify the effect of office type on indicators of health and performance2014In: Innovation in behavioral medicine: 13th international Congress of Behavioral Medicine, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Seddigh, Aram
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Office type, performance and well-being: A study of how personality and work tasks interact with contemporary office environments and ways of working2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, many organisations are adopting offices that have an open design with or without flexible seating. While advocates of open-plan offices propose that these office types lead to cost savings and aid inter and intra-team communication, opponents argue that these office types are associated with decreased performance and worsened health among employees. This thesis investigates how the type of office (cell offices, shared room offices, small open-plan offices, medium-sized open plan offices, large open-plan offices and flex offices) influences employee health and performance, and whether this is different for different personalities and jobs with different concentration demands. Data were gathered by means of surveys and cognitive tests from five organisations with different office types. In Study I (N=1241), the aim was to investigate the main effect of office type on indicators of health and performance and the interaction effect of office type with the need to concentrate in order to carry out work tasks. Office type alone was associated with distraction and cognitive stress in such a way that cell offices were associated with fewest problems, followed by flex offices, while open-plan offices were associated with the most problems. While employees in open-plan offices and employees in flex offices reported more problems as the need for concentration increased, employees in cell offices reported the same level of problems regardless of the need of concentration. Study II (N=527) investigated how performance on a memory test was affected during normal working conditions as compared to a quiet baseline. There was a negative dose-response relationship between the size of the open-plan office environment and the drop in word recall during the normal working condition. However, Study II also showed that individuals working in cell offices had as high a drop in performance during normal working conditions as did those working in large open-plan office environments. Study III (N=1133–1171) focused on the interaction effect between office type and individual differences in personality. The personality trait agreeableness interacted with office type on the outcome variables distraction and job satisfaction. Specifically, Study III may indicate that as offices get more open and flexible, agreeable people will report more problems. In conclusion, the studies in the present thesis have implications for practice and suggest that office type impacts on employee health and performance, while concentration demands of the job and agreeableness moderate the effects. Although employees report higher level of distraction in open-plan office environments, when performance on a demanding task is measured, cell offices are not as favourable during normal working conditions as self-reported data usually indicate. Organisations should also be aware that, among open-plan offices, small open-plan offices are associated with fewer problems.

  • 8.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Concentration requirements modify the effect of office type on indicators of health and performance2014In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 38, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the interaction between need for concentration on the job and six office types in relation to distraction, cognitive stress, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal efficiency and general health. 1241 employees from five organizations participated in the study. Cell offices were associated with lower reported levels of distraction and cognitive stress, and flex offices with lower distraction, among the employees compared with all other open-plan office types. There were no significant differences in the outcome variables between different types of open-plan offices. However, there was an interaction between office type and the need for concentration for the job; employees in the high need for concentration group reported more distraction in all office types except in cell offices and also more cognitive stress in all office types except cell offices and flex offices. In conclusion, cell offices may be preferable for tasks that require higher need for concentrations.

  • 9.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Jönsson, Fredrik U.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bodin Danielsson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Effect of variation in noise absorption in open-plan office: A field study with a cross-over design2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 44, p. 34-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Noise has repeatedly been shown to be one of the most recurrent reasons for complaints in open-plan office environments. The aim of the present study was to investigate if enhanced or worsened sound absorption in open-plan offices is reflected in the employees' ratings of disturbances, cognitive stress, and professional efficacy. Employees working on two different floors of an office building were followed as three manipulations were made in room acoustics on each of the two floors by means of less or more absorbing tiles & wall absorbents. For one of the floors, the manipulations were from better to worse to better acoustical conditions, while for the other the manipulations were worse to better to worse. The acoustical effects of these manipulations were assessed according to the new ISO-standard (ISO-3382-3, 2012) for open-plan rooms acoustics. In addition, the employees responded to questionnaires after each change. Our analyses showed that within each floor enhanced acoustical conditions were associated with lower perceived disturbances and cognitive stress. There were no effects on professional efficiency. The results furthermore suggest that even a small deterioration in acoustical room properties measured according to the new ISO-standard for open-plan office acoustics has a negative impact on self-rated health and disturbances. This study supports previous studies demonstrating the importance of acoustics in work environments and shows that the measures suggested in the new ISO-standard can be used to adequately differentiate between better and worse room acoustics in open plan offices.

  • 10.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
    Platts, Loretta G.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does Personality Have a Different Impact on Self-Rated Distraction, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance in Different Office Types?2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the joint effect of office type (cell, shared room, open-plan, and flex) and personality, measured by the Big Five personality traits, on self-rated measures of distraction, job satisfaction, and job performance (measured by professional efficacy). Regression analyses with interactions between personality and office type were conducted on 1205 participants working in 5 organizations from both the private and public sectors. While few interactions were observed in the cases of professional efficacy and job satisfaction, several were observed between personality traits and office type on the level of distraction reported. Specifically, more emotionally stable participants reported lower distraction, particularly those working in flex offices. Both agreeableness and openness to experience were associated with higher levels of distraction among participants in open-plan compared to cell offices.

  • 11.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does personality matter for performance in different office types?: A study of how personality and office type interact in relation to self-rated job performanceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Office design and personality traits have both separately been show to affect indicators of job performance.  In this study we investigated the joint effect of office designs (individual office rooms, shared rooms, flex offices, and different sizes of open-plan office environments) and individual differences in personality, measured by the Big Five personality traits and stimulus screening ability, on self-rated indicators of employees’ performance. We collected data from 5 different organizations in both the private and public sectors and conducted 6 separate MANCOVAs to study the interaction effect of office type and individual differences. Our data suggest that agreeableness is the only trait that interacts with office type. People who work in medium-sized open-plan offices, large open-plan offices and flex offices report higher distraction if they score high on agreeableness. People who work in small and medium-sized open-plan offices report higher job satisfaction if they are highly agreeable. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate that except for emotional stability and stimulus screening, office type, and not individual differences, is the strongest predictor of performance. 

  • 12.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Bodin Danielson, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Does Need for Concentration Modify the Effect of Office Type on Health and Productivity?2014In: Book of Proceedings, 11th Conference of the European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology: Looking at the past-planning for the future: Capitalizing on OHP multidisciplinarity / [ed] N.J.A. Andreou, A. Jain, D. Hollis, J. Hassard & K. Teoh, Nottingham, UK: European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology , 2014, p. 270-271Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of the impact on health and productivity of different types of office environments usually compare cell offices with open-plan offices. This paper investigates the interaction between need for concentration on the job and six more specific office types (cell office, shared-room office, small open-plan office, medium-sized open-plan office, large open-plan office and flex office) in relation to measures of health and productivity.

    A 2x6 between-subject multivariate analysis of covariance was conducted on the dependent variables distraction, cognitive stress, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, personal efficiency and general health while controlling for age, educational level, gender and sector of the labourmarket. The independent variables were need for concentration (two categories) and office type (six categories). 1,241 employees from five organizations, both in the private and public sectors, participated in the study.

    Cell offices were associated with lower reported levels of distraction and cognitive stress, and flex offices with lower distraction, among the employees compared with all other open-plan office types. However, there were no significant differences in the outcome variables between different types of open-plan offices. There was an interaction between office type and the need for concentration for the job; employees in the high need for concentration group reported more distraction in all office types except in cell offices and also more cognitive stress in all office types except cell offices and flex offices.

    This study suggests the presence of negative health and productivity aspects in individuals working in open-plan offices. This seems especially true for those who have tasks that require a high need for concentration. In order to prevent poor health and lost of productivity, organizations working in similar office types should have an action plan in order to lower the amount of distraction and cognitive stress prevalent in open-plan offices.

  • 13.
    Seddigh, Aram
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden.
    Stenfors, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Berntson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Bååth, Rasmus
    Sikström, Sverker
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    The association between office design and performance on demanding cognitive tasks2015In: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 42, p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The physical office environment has been shown to be associated with indicators of both health and performance. This study focuses on how memory performance is affected in normal working conditions compared to a quiet baseline (with low amount irrelevant stimuli) in different office types, including cell offices, small open-plan offices, medium-sized open-plan offices and large open-plan offices. The results showed that the drop in performance from the quiet baseline to normal working conditions was higher in larger, compared to smaller, open-plan offices. However, contrary to our hypothesis we found that cell offices might have negative effects on performance comparable to those of large open-plan offices. These results indicate that employees in small open-plan offices, in comparison to large, have better possibilities to conduct cognitively demanding tasks and that cell offices might not be as advantageous as previously thought.

1 - 13 of 13
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf