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  • 1. Borghans, Lex
    et al.
    Golsteyn, Bart H. H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Does Expert Advice Improve Educational Choice?2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 12, article id e0145378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports evidence that an individual meeting with a study counselor at high school significantly improves the quality of choice of tertiary educational field, as self-assessed 18 months after graduation from college. To address endogeneity, we explore the variation in study counseling practices between schools as an instrumental variable (IV). Following careful scrutiny of the validity of the IV, our results indicate a significant and positive influence of study counseling on the quality of educational choice, foremost among males and those with low educated parents. The overall result is stable across a number of robustness checks.

  • 2. De Luna, Xavier
    et al.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerlund, Olle
    Can Adult Education Delay Retirement from the Labour Market?2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Several studies have suggested that education is associated with later retirement from the labour market. In this paper, we examine whether adult education, involving enrolees aged 42 or above, delays retirement to potentially increase labour force participation among the elderly. With Swedish register data of transcripts from adult education and annual earnings, which encompasses 1979-2004 and 1982-2004 respectively, we exploit the fact that adult education is a large-scale phenomenon in Sweden and construct a measure of the timing of the transition from being self-supported by productive work to being supported by pension transfers. We match samples of treated and controls on the propensity score and use non-parametric estimation of survival rates. The results indicate that adult education has no effect on the timing of the retirement from the labour force. This can be contrasted with the fact that adult education is one of the cornerstones of the OECD strategy for “active ageing” and the European Union’s “Lisbon strategy” for growth and jobs.

  • 3.
    Goldsteyn, Bart H. H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Maastricht University, The Netherlands; IZA (Institute of Labor Economics), Germany.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Linnaeus University, Sweden; IZA (Institute of Labor Economics), Germany.
    Earnings over the Life Course: General versus Vocational Education2017In: Journal of Human Capital, ISSN 1932-8575, E-ISSN 1932-8664, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 167-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two common hypotheses regarding the relative benefits of vocational versus general education are (1) that vocational skills enhance relative short-term earnings and (2) that general skills enhance relative long-term earnings. Empirical evidence for these hypotheses has remained limited. Based on Swedish registry data of individuals in short (2-year) upper secondary school programs, this study provides a first exploration of individuals’ earnings across nearly complete careers. The descriptive earnings patterns indicate support for both hypotheses 1 and 2. The support holds when grade point average and family fixed effects are controlled for and also when enrollment in further education and fertility decisions are taken into account.

  • 4.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rengöring, underhåll och tvätt: betydelsen av RUT-avdrag för kvinnors arbetsmarknadsutbud2014In: Lönsamt arbete: familjeansvarets fördelning och konsekvenser : forskningsrapport till Delegationen för jämställdhet i arbetslivet / [ed] Katarina Boye och Magnus Nermo, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2014Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Relationship between Hours of Domestic Services and Female Earnings: Panel Register Data Evidence from a Reform2013Report (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The relationship between hours of outsourced domestic services and female earnings: Evidence from a Swedish tax reform2018In: Research in Social Stratification and Mobility, ISSN 0276-5624, E-ISSN 1878-5654, Vol. 55, p. 120-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The negative relationship between women’s time in paid and unpaid work is well established in empirical research. We contribute to this literature with an analysis of Swedish population register data 2000–2010 covering a tax discount reform introduced in 2007 which implied a 50% cost reduction for outsourcing of domestic work. We use difference-in-difference propensity score matching to estimate the extent to which purchases of domestic work implies increased time in paid work approximated by earnings. For our samples of married women, the results indicate that domestic outsourcing corresponding to 2.0–3.5 percent of full-time work (40–70 h per year) increase labor market work by a similar amount, 2.4–3.6% of annual earnings. We discuss several possible explanations as to why these estimates are substantially higher than reported by previous studies.

  • 7.
    Halldén, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Ökar RUT-avdrag kvinnors arbetsmarknadsutbud?2015In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 52-62Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8. Kilpi-Jakonen, Elina
    et al.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Adult Learning, Labor Market Outcomes, and Inequality: The Case of Sweden2014In: Adult Learning in Modern Societies: An International Comparison from a Life-Course Perspective / [ed] Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Elina Kilpi-Jakonen, Daniela Vono de Vilhena, Sandra Buchholz, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2014, p. 184-203Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9. Kilpi-Jakonen, Elina
    et al.
    Vono de Vilhena, Daniela
    Kosyakova, Yuliya
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Blossfeld, Hans-Peter
    The impact of formal adult education on the likelihood of being employed: a comparative overview2012In: Studies of Transition States and Societies, ISSN 1736-874X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 48-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    et al.
    Ekonomihögskolan, Nationalekonomi, Linnéuniversitet.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Shape of the Income Distribution and Economic Growth: Evidence from Swedish Labour Market Regions2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the association between inequality and growth across 72 labor market regions in Sweden 1990-2006. Highly accurate measures of growth and inequality (gini, Q3, p9075, p5010) are derived from population register data. The regional set-up also reduces problems with omitted variable bias and endogeneity found in cross country comparisons since the regions within a country share the same redistributive policies and institutions. The findings suggest that inequality between the 90th and 75th percentiles enhances regional growth. This result no longer holds when we take into account changes in commuting patterns. Although only suggestive, the finding is interesting in that it is consistent with the hypothesis that inequality enhances growth by stimulating commuting incentives.

  • 11.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Access to Education Over the Working Life in Sweden: Priorities, Institutions and Efficiency2012Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To facilitate individuals to adjust their skills to changes in market demands, Sweden has a relatively generous policy to stimulate formal adult education at the compulsory, upper secondary and tertiary levels. This paper provides an overview of what research has reported to assess if and/or how it may be an efficient use of tax payers' money. Some institutional factors are also briefly presented to discuss what is likely to be required for such a policy to exist in a particular country.

  • 12.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Adult Education for a Better Society?2008Book (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Att välja utbildning: betydelse för individ och samhälle: studievägledning, gymnasieval, vuxenutbildning2016Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Comprehensive Education or Vocational Training for the Unemployed?2007In: International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 42-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of comprehensive education as compared with vocational training by using Swedish data on a large sample of unemployed individuals aged 25 to 55.

    Design/methodology/approach – The Adult Education Initiative (AEI) in Sweden was introduced in the autumn of 1997 and generated a massive expansion of subsidized adult comprehensive education. Participants in the vocational part of Labour Market Training (LMT) are used as a comparison group. The relative program effects are obtained by way of OLS fixed effects estimates, using register data of annual wage earnings from 1991 to 2003.

    Findings – There are weaker earnings effects of comprehensive education relative to vocational training. However, insignificant coefficient results are obtained for individuals aged 43-55 and also for females who prior to enrolment had experienced two-year upper secondary schooling or resided in a municipality associated with a low level of average educational attainment.

    Research limitations/implications – Identification of true underlying effects rely on fixed effects estimates. Using non-experimental data, one would ideally have access to an instrumental variable, which could explain program choice without being correlated with wage earnings.

    Practical implications – The results add to our knowledge on the relative average returns to general and specific human capital accumulation. In this specific case, more careful targeting of participants in the AEI could have improved the relative efficiency of the program.

    Originality/value – This study offers guidance to labour market policy makers on how an appropriate mix is attained between vocational training and comprehensive education.

  • 15.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Does adult education at upper secondary level influence annual wage earnings?2007Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Effekterna av ökade offentliga utbildningsutgifter på ekonomisk tillväxt och sysselsättning. En litteraturöversikt av nationalekonomisk forskning2013In: Specialstudier Konjunkturinstitutet, ISSN 1650-996X, no 37, p. 37p. 115-153Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Evidence on the Impact of Adult Upper Secondary Education in Sweden2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is the first to explore the earnings effects of credits attained in adult education at upper secondary level (AE) in Sweden. It is also investigated whether individuals with and without AE prior to enrolment in higher studies differ in their achievements at university and/or in their subsequent earnings. The analyses are based on register data of the cohort born in 1970 of which more than one third at some point has been registered in AE. In the preferred specification, credits equal to one year of AE are found to increase annual wage earnings by 4.1 per cent for males and 3.6 per cent for females. The results are mainly driven by course credits with an element of specific knowledge such as health related subjects and computer science, while more general subjects such as Mathematics, Swedish or English are linked with zero returns. Concerning higher education, the results indicate a lower payoff for AE individuals if higher studies are limited to less than two years. There is also evidence of a lower probability of completing four years of higher studies, in particular among females.

  • 18.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Evidence on the Impact of Adult Upper Secondary Education in Sweden2008In: Adult Education: Issues and Developments, NOVA publishers, New York , 2008Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hur påverkar gymnasialt komvux inkomster och vidare studier?2008In: Arbetsmarknad och Arbetsliv, Vol. 14, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Hur påverkar gymnasialt komvux löneinkomster och vidare studier?2007Report (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Interpreting estimates of heritability - A note on the twin decomposition2013In: Economics and Human Biology, ISSN 1570-677x, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 201-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While most outcomes may in part be genetically mediated, quantifying genetic heritability is a different matter. To explore data on twins and decompose the variation is a classical method to determine whether variation in outcomes, e.g. IQ or schooling, originate from genetic endowments or environmental factors. Despite some criticism, the model is still widely used. The critique is generally related to how estimates of heritability may encompass environmental mediation. This aspect is sometimes left implicit by authors even though its relevance for the interpretation is potentially profound. This short note is an appeal for clarity from authors when interpreting the magnitude of heritability estimates. It is demonstrated how disregarding existing theoretical contributions can easily lead to unnecessary misinterpretations and/or controversies. The key arguments are relevant also for estimates based on data of adopted children or from modern molecular genetics research.

  • 22.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nature or Nurture? A Note on the Misinterpreted Twin Decomposition2011Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    The Impact on Annual Earnings of Adult Upper Secondary Education in Sweden2010In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 303-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The public supply of adult education is very differ­ent between countries, making it likely that there is scope for effi­ciency gains. The contribution of this paper is to provide an economic evaluation of the earnings im­pact of adult edu­cation at upper secondary level (AE) in Sweden, where the supply is plausibly larger than in any other country. The analysis is based on register data 1990-2002 of the co­hort born in 1970 on accomplished AE course credits and possibly subse­quent higher education. Difference-in-differences esti­mates indicate that for AE enrollees in 1994-96, a year of AE credits increases earnings in 2002 by 6 % for males and by 4.5 % for females. The estimates are reconciled with conflicting results from earlier studies. According to crude calculations, which disregard other societal benefits of AE, the earnings benefits are sufficient to cover the costs incurred by the society within 17 years.

  • 24.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Upgrading the Low Skilled? Is Public Provision of Formal Education a Sensible Policy?2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    At various political levels, including the OECD and the EU, it is repeatedly emphasized that upgrading the low skilled is an important area for the economic and social development of modern societies. Employers are typically reluctant to train low skilled, who in their turn are unwilling to participate due to financial constraints or a perception of low quality and/or returns to training. If this is a market imperfection, a possible remedy is suggested by public provision of formal education where enrollees are eligible for financial support. However, the costs may be large and the economic returns to formal adult education (AE) for low skilled, a crucial measure to assess if expenses should be increased or decreased, is a virtually unexplored issue. This study uses Swedish register data 1990-2004 of low skilled siblings aged 24-43 in 1994 to estimate difference-indifference- in-differences models which include family fixed effects. It is found that a year of AE improves earnings by 4.4 per cent, but calculations indicate that the private returns alone only roughly cover the costs incurred by society, implying that social returns to AE are needed to justify the expenses.

  • 25.
    Stenberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Using Longitudinal Data to Evaluate Publicly Provided Formal Education for Low skilled2011In: Economics of Education Review, ISSN 0272-7757, E-ISSN 1873-7382, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1262-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern societies would potentially reap large benefits from upgrading low skilled's education. However, this is difficult to put into practice because employers are reluctant to train low skilled and because low skilled are unwilling to participate. To circumvent this potential market imperfection, a large supply of formal education in Sweden is complemented with the eligibility of enrollees for financial support. This study uses detailed data on Swedish siblings aged 24-43 in 1994 to evaluate the impact on annual earnings. The estimated average return was 4.4% in 2004. Calculations indicate that this is barely sufficient to cover society's total costs.

  • 26.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Westerlund, Olle
    Can adult education delay retirement from the labour market?2010Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Statistiska institutionen, Umeå universitet.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Department of Economics, Umeå University.
    Can adult education delay retirement from the labour market?2012In: Journal of Population Economics, ISSN 0933-1433, E-ISSN 1432-1475, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 677-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine whether adult education delays retirement to potentially increase labour force participation among the elderly, a mechanism suggested in the OECD strategy for "active ageing" and the "Lisbon strategy" of the EU. Using register data from Sweden, we analyse transcripts from adult education for the period 1979–2004 and annual earnings 1982–2004. We match samples of treated individuals, in adult education 1986–1989, and untreated on the propensity score. The timing of exit from the workforce is assessed by non-parametric estimation of survival rates in the labour force. The results indicate no effects of adult education on the timing of retirement.

  • 28.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Department of Statistics, Umeå University.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Department of Economics, Umeå University.
    Does Formal Education for Older Workers Increase Earnings? Analyzing Annual Data Stretching Over 25 Years2011Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments in the US, Canada and Europe have expressed an ambition to stimulate education of older. In this paper, we analyze if there are effects on annual earnings of formal education for participants aged 42-55 at the time of enrolment in 1994-1995. The analysis explores longitudinal population register data stretching from 1982 to 2007. The method used is difference-in-differences propensity score matching based on a rich set of covariates, including indicators of health and labor market marginalization. Results differ from earlier studies, implying no significant average earnings effects for males, positive effects for females, although insufficient to cover total costs.

  • 29.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    de Luna, Xavier
    Westerlund, Olle
    Does formal education for older workers increase earnings?: evidence based on rich data and long-term follow-up2014In: Labour, ISSN 1121-7081, E-ISSN 1467-9914, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 163-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Governments in Europe, Canada and the USA have expressed an ambition to stimulate education of older. In this paper, we analyse if there are effects on annual earnings of formal education for participants aged 42–55 at the time of enrolment in 1994–95. The analysis explores longitudinal population register data stretching from 1982 to 2007. The method used is difference-in-differences propensity score matching based on a rich set of covariates, including indicators of health and labor market marginalization. Our findings underline the importance of long follow up periods and imply positive effects for women, especially so for women with children, and no significant average earnings effects for men. These results differ from earlier studies but are stable to several alternative assumptions regarding unobservable characteristics. Data further indicate that the gender gap in our estimates may stem from differences in underlying reasons for enrolment.

  • 30.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Lundborg, Petter
    Nature, Nurture and Socioeconomic Policy: What Can We Learn from Molecular Genetics?2010In: Economics and Human Biology, ISSN 1570-677x, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 320-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries use public resources to compensate individuals with genetic disorders, identified by behaviors/symptoms such as chronic diseases and disabilities. This paper draws attention to molecular genetic research which may provide a new dimension to our understanding of how socioeconomic outcomes are generated. We provide an overview of the recently emerging evidence of gene–environment interaction effects. This literature points out specific areas where policies may compensate groups of individuals carrying genetic risks, without the need to identify anyone's genetic endowments. Moreover, epigenetics studies, which concern heritable changes in gene functions that occur independently of the DNA sequence, have shown that environments may affect heritable traits across generations. It means that policies which neutralize adverse environments may also increase intergenerational mobility, given that genetic and/or environmental risk factors are more common in socially disadvantaged groups.

  • 31.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Rooth, Dan-Olof
    The Shape of the Income Distribution and Economic Growth – Evidence from Swedish Labour Market Regions2012In: Scottish Journal of Political Economy, ISSN 0036-9292, E-ISSN 1467-9485, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 196-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze the association between income inequality and economic growth using 72 labor market regions in Sweden during the period of 1990–2006. Compared with studies of cross-country data, the regional set-up reduces problems with omitted variable bias and endogeneity as regions within a country share the same redistributive policies and institutions. Using population register data, highly accurate measures of growth and inequality (gini, Q3, p9075, p5010) are derived. OLS cross-section and panel estimates imply that inequality between the 90 and 75th percentiles enhances regional growth and that the share of income falling to the third quintile reduces growth. These results no longer hold when we apply regions specific fixed effects and/or system GMM.

  • 32.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Linneaus University, Växjö/Kalmar, Sweden; IZA, Bonn, Germany.
    Westerlund, O
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    The long-term earnings consequences of general vs. specific training of the unemployed2015In: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, E-ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 4, no 22, p. 1-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Training programs for the unemployed typically involve training specific skills in demand amongst employers. In 1997, Swedish unemployed could also choose general schooling at the upper secondary level. This offers a unique opportunity to assess the theoretically ambiguous long-term relative earnings of general vs. specific training for unemployed. Analyzing detailed administrative data 1990–2010, we find 1) that specific training is associated with higher earnings in the short run, 2) that earnings converge 5–7 years post program and 3) that individuals act on their comparative advantages. When we extrapolate our estimates to life-time earnings, there is overall a relative advantage of specific training. However, for females with limited prior education, we find a relative life-time earnings advantage of general training.

  • 33.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerlund, Olle
    Does comprehensive education work for the long-term unemployed?2008In: Labour Economics, Vol. 15, p. 54-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerlund, Olle
    Education and retirement: does University education at mid-age extend working life?2013In: IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, ISSN 2193-9012, Vol. 2, no 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To our knowledge, this paper provides the first study evaluating the effects of higher         education for adults on the timing of retirement. Using detailed longitudinal population         register data 1982–2010, we track first-time enrollees in higher education in 1992–1993.  Our sample is aged 42–55 at the time of enrollment and thus aged 60–73 in 2010. We find that higher education increases labor market survival rates when aged 61–66 by about 5 percentage points. The estimates represent relatively large effects. Tentative calculations indicate that if enrollment occurs at age 42, the retirement delay represents about one percent in yearly earnings returns per year of tertiary education.

  • 35.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Linneaus University, Sweden; IZA, Germany.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Flexibility at a Cost - Should Governments Stimulate Tertiary Education for Adults?2016In: Journal of the Economics of Ageing, ISSN 2212-828X, Vol. 7, p. 69-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most OECD countries experience high unemployment rates and declining growth in higher educational attainment. An often suggested government policy is therefore to allocate resources towards formal schooling for adults. However, returns on such investments are uncertain and the foregone earnings are potentially large. We use Swedish population register data from 1982 to 2011 to estimate average long run earnings returns on higher education for 29- to 55-year-olds who enrolled 1992-1993. We find substantial positive estimates, but these only fully emerge after approximately ten years. Nevertheless, calculations indicate that the benefits for society exceed the costs also under fairly pessimistic assumptions. Also, the estimated returns in this study are more than twice the size compared with earlier studies of Swedish adults who enrolled AE at the upper secondary level.

  • 36.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerlund, Olle
    Flexibility at a Cost – Should GovernmentsStimulate Tertiary Education for Adults?2015Report (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Stenberg, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Westerlund, Olle
    Kunskapslyft för arbetslösa genom generell utbildning i stället för yrkesinriktade program2015In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Other academic)
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