Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Berge, Maria
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Klassklättring och matematik-kapital: En fallstudie2022In: Utbildning och Demokrati, ISSN 1102-6472, E-ISSN 2001-7316, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 31-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breaking the class ceiling? A case study of a university mathematics student from a non-academic background. In this paper we report from a case study of a student from non-academic background, who has continued on to study mathematics in higher education. Bourdieu’s concepts of capital, habitus, and field were used to analyse the student’s trajectory into university mathematics, with a particular focus on mathematics specific capital. Data was collected through classroom observations and three semi-structured interviews, over a period of three years. The analysis showed how the student acquired mathematics capital by acting as an informal teaching assistant, thus receiving recognition from both peers and teachers for his mathematical abilities. The longitudinal interviews also demonstrated how the student has continuously been able to expand his social capital related to mathematics and science. We argue that it is important for higher education researchers and teachers to consider disciplinary specific capital, and also to provide students with opportunities to acquire such capital.

  • 2.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Identitet, normer och naturvetenskap/teknik – intervju som metod2021In: Vetenskapsteori och forskningsmetoder i utbildningsvetenskap / [ed] Thomas Nygren, Natur och kultur, 2021, 1, p. 107-123Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Berge, Maria
    Österling, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Valero, Paola
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Walking Ethnographies in Higher Education Spaces of Physics and Mathematics2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Johansson, Anders
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Young peoples’ online science practices as a gateway to higher education STEM2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    King, Heather
    Godec, Spela
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Science identities: A systematic review of a consolidating field2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a systematic review of research on learner identities within science education research. The purpose is to identify different methodological approaches in the field of science identities research, the prevalence of the approaches, and their strengths and weaknesses as well as to identify key challenges and fruitful future developments. In an open, thematic analyses of 190 papers, located through Web of Science searches, we identify three different methodological approaches; macro-studies within a psychological tradition (30 studies), macro-studies within a sociological tradition (20 studies), and micro-studies within an interpretivist tradition (131 studies) (9 papers are not empirical studies). Consequently, this field is dominated by small-scale, qualitative case studies, in accordance with what has been found in previous reviews. Yet, this field is also found to be conceptually diverse, with the notion of identity used broadly, sometimes theorised as a perspective, and sometimes used to denote an empirical phenomena. In moving the field further, we argue that it would be beneficial to establish a stronger theoretical and conceptual coherence, thereby aiding the building of cumulative knowledge across studies. Further, we also see an increased attentiveness to scaling as a key for making impact; both regarding small-scale qualitative studies being scaled up to broader groups of students and educators and large-scale quantitative studies being scaled down for the use of individual teachers.

  • 6.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    King, Heather
    Godec, Spela
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    The identity turn in science education research: a critical review of methodologies in a consolidating field2023In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, no 18, p. 695-754Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This manuscript reflects on the affordances and limitations of methodological approaches commonly adopted by science education researchers examining learner identities. Our aims are to unpack the relative strengths and weaknesses of such approaches and note their respective prevalence. In so doing, we identify and critique studies which we consider exemplify the different approaches and, in turn, note the direction of fruitful developments and the nature of key challenges. From our review of the field, we suggest that three discrete methodological approaches can be identified: macro-studies within a psychological tradition; macro-studies within a sociological tradition; and micro-studies within an interpretive tradition. Our review comprised a critical analysis of papers included in the Web of Science databases published between 1998 and 2018. A total of 198 papers examining aspects of learner identity relating to science were identified. Of these, the majority (146) were categorised as micro-studies within an interpretive tradition. We discuss the implications of methodological choices for the advancement of understanding and further note ambiguities in the field particularly in relation to the ways in which learner identity research is conceived. We also raise questions for the field relating to the ways in which findings may be scaled, and how the field might develop to allow stronger theoretical and conceptual coherence.  

  • 7.
    Danielsson, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison
    Johansson, Anders
    The exceptional physics girls – grown up2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focus on the identity trajectories of eleven female students enrolled in higher education physics, with a particular focus on how they have acquired and mobilized resources during their trajectories. We are also interested in what has made higher education physics possible for students who enrol in such educations despite limited opportunities to accumulate valued forms of science capital. The study draws on interviews with 20 (11 women/9 men) first- and second-year university physics students. The interviews are inspired by life history interviews and structured around the construction of a ‘time line’. In the preliminary analysis we have we have discerned two different trajectories into higher education physics; ’The high achiever trajectory’ (characterized by general high achievement in school and ’The natural physicist trajectory’ (characterized by interest in and identification with a particular area of physics or a particular purpose with the physics education, rather than continuous academic high achievement). Across both trajectories the interviewed women can be understood as ‘exceptional’ in various ways. In particular the students’ accumulation of science related social capital stands out and it is noticeable how it extends far beyond the family. The accumulation of science related social capital is connected to the furthering of high-level scientific literacy and a deepened knowledge of how the science community works, showing how different aspects of science capital are inter-related and can re-inforce one another

  • 8.
    Danielsson, Anna T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Johansson, Anders
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Young Peoples’ Online Science Practices as a Gateway to Higher Education STEM2023In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 759-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this manuscript is to explore how students perceive that online practices have enabled their participation in university physics programmes. In order to conceptualise how students bridge their science participation across physical and online spaces, we make use of the learning ecology perspective. This perspective is complemented with the notion of science capital, analysing how students have been able to strengthen different aspects of science capital through online participation. Data has been generated through semi-structured interviews guided by a timeline, constructed in collaboration between the interviewer and the interviewee. Twenty-one students enrolled in higher education physics have been interviewed, with a focus on their trajectories into higher education physics. The findings focus on four students who in various ways all have struggled to access science learning resources and found ways to utilise online spaces as a complement to their physical learning ecologies. In the manuscript, we show how online practices have contributed to the students’ learning ecologies, e.g. in terms of building networks and functioning as learning support, and how resources acquired through online science practices have both use and exchange value in the wider science community. Online science participation is thus both curiosity driven and founded in instrumental reasons (using online tutoring to pass school science). Furthermore, we argue that online spaces have the potential to offer opportunities for participation and network building for students who do not have access to science activities and science people in their everyday surroundings.

  • 9. Gonsalves, Allison J.
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Avraamidou, Lucy
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Esquivel, Rebeca
    Using story-based methodologies to explore physics identities: How do moments add up to a life in physics?2023In: Physical Review Physics Education Research, E-ISSN 2469-9896, Vol. 19, no 2, article id 020106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article details methodologies employed to enable sharing and coconstructing the stories of threewomen’s lives in physics. The first case explores the usefulness of timeline interviewing, where participantsnarrate episodes that are coconstructed with the researcher as meaningful over time. We illustrate thismethod in the case of a mature student in Sweden from a working-class background who shared momentsthat added up to a life outside of physics and then a sharp turn into physics later in life. The second caseexplores life-history interviewing using a narrative-inquiry approach and deep relationship building whichenabled the coconstruction of stories of experiences over time. These moments are coconstructed with theresearcher and analyzed using an intersectionality lens to yield a story depicting the transnationalexperiences of a woman of color moving across various European contexts into the North Americanphysics context. The final case is of a first-generation Canadian woman of color who shared her navigationsof in and out of school physics via a method known as the “Rivers of Life.” Using this method, theparticipant narrates their experiences with physics as a river, using metaphorical tools like rafts, rocks,rapids, tributaries to discuss various moments described as twists and turns over time that together amountto a life in physics. We discuss the value of different approaches to coconstructing narratives withparticipants and, in particular, the need for this kind of research in physics context

  • 10. Gonsalves, Allison J.
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Johansson, Anders
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Other spaces for young people's identity work in physics: resources accessed through informal physics education in Sweden2022In: Education and Involvement in Precarious Times: Abstract Book NERA Conference 2022 / [ed] Michael Dal, Reykjavik: School of Education, University of Iceland , 2022, p. 296-297Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11. Gonsalves, Allison J.
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Danielsson, Anna T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Other spaces for young people’s identity work in physics: Resources accessed through university-adjacent informal physics learning contexts in Sweden2022In: Physical Review Physics Education Research, E-ISSN 2469-9896, Vol. 18, no 2, article id 020118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For young women, inbound identity trajectories into physics are generally regarded as exceptional. In this study, we investigated the experiences that young women have which may support their sustained interest and achievement in physics, and their ongoing inbound trajectories into post-secondary physics education. To understand these experiences, we look to the role of informal physics learning (IPL) environments as spaces which can offer resources that support women’s trajectories into physics. In this paper, we highlight the important role of what we call “university-adjacent” IPL experiences—internships, summer schools, and associations that connect secondary students with the research lives of physicists. Focusing on case studies of six women enrolled in post-secondary physics programs across Sweden, we identify the various forms of resources made available through IPL environments, and how these create possibilities for young women to engage in forms of identity work that contribute to the construction of new possible selves in physics. Findings suggest that young women can access important relational and ideational resources through university-adjacent IPL programs. Relational resources included (a) supportive social networks, (b) enduring relationships, and (c) relatability. Importantly, our research finds that IPL opportunities that emphasize relationship building can create immersive experiences which go beyond representation and rather emphasize opportunities to develop practice-linked identities. Ideational resources emerged as (a) sources of information which possibilized physics for participants, and (b) types of information that provided possibilities to learn about the life of a physicist. Finally, while we claim that IPL experiences provide important possibilities for young women to immerse themselves in the practices of physics, we also discuss that these kinds of experiences remain inaccessible to most students, and thus reproduce a certain elitism in the field.

  • 12. Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Choice narratives of “unexpected” physics students2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13. Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Following or defying expectations – the choice narratives of  “unexpected” physics students2022Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14. Johansson, Anders
    et al.
    Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Danielsson, Anna T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Performing legitimate choice narratives in physics: possibilities for under-represented physics students2023In: Cultural Studies of Science Education, ISSN 1871-1502, E-ISSN 1871-1510, Vol. 18, p. 1255-1283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Higher education physics has long been a field with a disproportionately skewed representation in terms of gender, class, and ethnicity. Responding to this challenge, this study explores the trajectories of “unexpected” (i.e., demographically under-represented) students into higher education physics. Based on timeline-guided life-history interviews with 21 students enrolled in university physics programs across Sweden, the students’ accounts of their trajectories into physics are analyzed as choice narratives. The analysis explores what ingredients are used to tell a legitimate story of physics participation, in relation to dominant discourses in physics culture, and wider social and political discourses. Results indicate that students narrate their choice as based on motivations of physics being a prestigious and challenging subject, of a deep interest in and a natural ability for physics, as well as a wish to use physics for contributing to the world. While most of these affiliations to physics has been documented in earlier research, the study shows how they are negotiated in relation to social locations such as gender, class and migration history, and used to perform an authentic and legitimate choice narrative in the interview situation. Furthermore, the study reports and discusses the possibility of conceiving the role of physics in students’ lives as something beyond a “pure”, intellectually challenging, and “prestigious” subject. In contrast, and with implications for widening participation, the stories of “unexpected” physics students indicate that physics can be reconceived as socially and altruistically oriented.

  • 15. Larsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna T.
    Lundqvist, Eva
    A Fragmented Training Environment: Discourse Models in the Talk of Physics Teacher Educators2020In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 2559-2585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the results of an empirical study exploring the discourses of physics teacher educators. We ask how the expressed understandings of a physics teacher education programme in the talk of teacher educators potentially support the identity construction of new teachers. Nine teacher educators from different sections of a physics teacher programme in Sweden were interviewed. The concept of discourse models was used to operationalise how the discourses of the teacher education programme potentially enable the performance of different physics teacher identities. The analysis resulted in the construction of four discourse models that could be seen to be both enabling and limiting the kinds of identity performances trainee physics teachers can enact. Knowledge of the models thus potentially empowers trainee physics teachers to understand the different goals of their educational programme and from there make informed choices about their own particular approach to becoming a professional physics teacher. We also suggest that for teacher educators, knowledge of the discourse models could facilitate making conscious, informed decisions about their own teaching practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16. Larsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    How women physics teacher candidates utilize their double outsider identities to productively learn physics2023In: Physical Review Physics Education Research, E-ISSN 2469-9896, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 010140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Underrepresentation of women in physics is a prominent issue in the western countries. Since physicsteachers are in a unique position to affect new generations of students, it has been suggested that they are animportant part of the solution. In this paper, we explore how trainee physics teachers create spaces forthemselves as learners of physics while negotiating their positioning as women and trainee teachers. Theempirical data consist of interviews with 17 trainee physics students, and the analysis focusespredominantly on the identity negotiations of three woman students. We find that the womensimultaneously submit to and master a “physics nerd” discourse that connects physics with nerdiness,masculinity, and intelligence, which enables them to successfully create subject positions incorporatingphysics student, teacher-student, femininity, and constructive study practice. This is of particularimportance to trainee physics teachers, who will be responsible for creating inclusive and productivephysics learning environments for their students.

  • 17.
    Nhu, Truong
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Anderhag, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Understanding Disciplinary-specific Academic Resilience: Case Study of a Southeast Asian Scholar in Higher Education in Sweden2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies carried out in numerous national contexts suggest that students from socio-economically impoverished backgrounds are associated with academic underachievement (Filmer & Pritchett, 1999). Some underprivileged students, however, manage to perform outstanding educational outcomes despite their adverse background. The dynamic process in which these students negotiate, adapt to, and cope with their circumstances is often referred to as ‘resilience’ (Howard et al., 1999).

    During the 1990s, researchers started to explore resilience in the context of education, that is ‘academic resilience’. Accordingly, the notion of academic resilience is described as performing relatively well in school despite an adverse background (Alva, 1991; Wang et al., 1994). Several studies have found that academic resilience is associated with certain protective factors, both related to the individual and their environment (home, school, community), that modify or influence a person’s responses to adversities (Jowkar et al., 2014). Such factors are important to identify in order to understand how suitable support can be provided in order to create inclusive and equitable educational opportunities for all.

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education research has a long tradition of engaging with inequalities, often related to the performance and participation of students from different genders, ethnicities, and socio-economic backgrounds. A variety of conceptual tools have been applied to understand the uneven performance and participation in science, such as interest and taste (Anderhag et al., 2015), science capital (Archer et al., 2015) and science identity (Danielsson et al., 2023). There is also a rich literature that seeks to adapt science education in order to enhance the sense of belonging in the discipline for students from disadvantaged backgrounds (Barton & Tan, 2009). Such teaching interventions are often characterized by how they seek to bridge students’ life-worlds and science by, for example, eliciting and valuing students’ funds of knowledge. Other studies look at how minoritized students in STEM responded to challenges and develop their mathematical identities and pursue STEM career (Joseph et al., 2020). Consequently, STEM education research has been deeply invested in improving the teaching and learning for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. Still, with a few notable exceptions (Ferguson & Martin‐Dunlo, 2021), this has not been conceptualized in terms of developing students’ academic resilience. We posit that an increased conversation between STEM education research seeking to improve the educational experience of disadvantaged students and research about academic resilience would be beneficial to both lines of research. Since the findings from the resilience research field are largely extracted from quantitative studies, the knowledge of how resilience is developed through the interplay between the individual and their environment is sparse.

    The aim of this paper is to contribute a multifaceted exploration of an educational trajectory from childhood characterized by circumstances to doing a PhD in mathematics. The study is grounded in an interest of understanding how academic resilience be conceptualized in a way that allows for STEM-specific disciplinary aspects to be taken into account. More specifically, we ask:

    - What resources (at individual/school/family/community level) were accessed by the student in order to allow for a successful educational trajectory in STEM?

    We will present our preliminary results from a pilot case study of a scholar coming from Southeast Asia and now doing PhD in Mathematics at a Swedish university.

  • 18. Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Johansson, Anders
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Possibilised by Physics: Students’ Retrospective Narratives about Safe Spaces and Emancipation2023Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19. Nyström, Anne-Sofie
    et al.
    Gonsalves, Allison J.
    Danielsson, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Teaching and Learning.
    Johansson, Anders
    Possibilities in physics: Students' retrospective narratives about safe spaces, beautiful boundaries, and emancipation2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims to explore students’ commitment to science, focusing three existential-orientated narrations about physics trajectories and well-being/ill-being. The paper draws from an on-going interview study with ‘non-traditional’ university physics education entrants, examining the conditions and encounters that made enrolment in selective higher education possible. Previous research on science identity contributes with insights into how interactions in everyday life – in schooling and beyond – promote and hinder young peoples’ science aspirations, accomplishments and persistence. Indeed, the advancement of knowledge about social reproduction, social mobility and strategies for widening participation in higher science education is motivated, in the Nordic countries and elsewhere, by social justice and national economic arguments. While this paper is informed by research on young people’s ‘choice-narratives’ (Holmegaard, 2015), it mainly draws on insights from research on well-being and, in particular, Sayer’s sociological work on suffering and conditions for human flourishing. Hence, we look into experiences of physics as a mediator for self-realization and resilience in hardships, rather than examining the conditions for young people’s physics commitments.

    The data comprise twenty timeline interviews (60-120 minutes) with 1st and 2nd year students enrolled in university physics programmes in Sweden. The students were encouraged to give accounts and construct a visual timeline (Sheridan et al, 2011) of their personal trajectory into higher physics education, with special attention to persons, events and conditions that they recognized as important in retrospect. Their accounts covered science commitment and non-commitment from a life-history perspective, delineated supportive encounters and conditions as well as barriers. This paper uses narrative analysis to explore three life-histories that were characterized by an emphasized existential narrative. The interviewees, two men and one woman, were re-entry students with diverse ethnic and social backgrounds.

    Findings comprise four elements that shaped the narratives: resilience, safe spaces, beautiful boundaries, and emancipation. 1) The trajectories were structured as stories about overcoming adversity (e.g. bullying, poverty and mental illness), in which attachment to Physics was narrated as vital for cultivating resilience. 2) Furthermore, Physics – not ‘school physics’ – was represented as a safe space in their overall chaotic and distressing childhood and youth, in part related to 3) its universal laws and orientation towards nature instead of man. 4) Undertaking formal higher physics education was narrated as a turning-point in that they had accumulated the resources to choose ‘oneself’ in spite of difficulties and doubts. Concluding, the paper seeks to contribute with insights into ‘under-represented’ students’ engagement in higher science education, bringing forward life-histories about physics as a mediator for well-being.

    Holmegaard, H. T. (2015). Performing a choice-narrative: A qualitative study of the patterns in STEM students’ higher education choices. International Journal of Science Education, 37(9), 1454–1477.Sayer, A. (2011). Why things matter to people: Social science, values and ethical life. New York: Cambridge University PressSheridan, J., Chamberlain, K. & Dupuis, A. (2011). ‘Timelining: Visualizing Experience’. Qualitative Research 11 (5): 552–69.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf