Change search
Refine search result
1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Elgán, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Kurvinen, Heidi
    International or Transnational? Continuities or Ruptures? Introduction to the Special Issue on Nordic Women and the Transnational Networks during the Cold War2022In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of women’s and gender history in the Nordic countries, this geographic region has served as an important contact point for scholars since the interest in women’s history awakened in the 1970s. The Nordic point of view was placed at the centre when the first biannual Nordic women’s history conference was organized in 1983. The exchange of ideas has flourished since then, following the research trends within the field in the Anglophone world (e.g. Blažević, 2015; Kurvinen & Matilainen, 2021).

    Despite the longstanding research networks on Nordic women’s and gender history, research has mostly been based on national case studies whereas comparative or border-crossing projects have been a rarity. This reflects the organization of historical research that necessitates archives as well as language and cultural knowledge to be performed. Nevertheless, national case studies have made an important contribution in increasing our knowledge of the variety of ways gender has affected the history of the Nordic countries. For example, previous scholarship has shown the differences in the history of Nordic women’s ways of organizing as well as their understandings of feminism, even though the Nordic countries—as a single entity—are often portrayed, in popular speech, as the leaders of gender equality in the world.

  • 2.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Educating Parents: Public Preschools and Parenting in Soviet Pedagogical Publications, 1945-19892010In: Journal of Family History, ISSN 0363-1990, E-ISSN 1552-5473, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 271-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the role preschools played in state politics aimed at the family in Soviet Russia. The study is inspired by Foucault’s theory on governmentality and is based on an analysis of Doshkolnoe vospitanie, the largest Soviet magazine on preschool education. This article shows that Soviet children were analyzed scientifically and that parents in Soviet Russia were not freed from the responsibilities of bringing up and educating their children. The central function of preschools was to remind the parents of their responsibilities and to control their performance of them.

  • 3.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Femininity and Beauty Practices in Soviet Russia in 1950-1960s2012In: Nordic Fashion Studies / [ed] Peter McNeil, Louise Wallenberg, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2012, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Kuli semii kuli: "zhenshchiny otstalykh narodov" i sovetskie politiki kulturnosti2012In: Tam vnutri: Praktiki vnutrennei kolonizatsii v kulturnoi istorii Rossii / [ed] Aleksander Etkind, Dirk Uffelmann, Ilia Kukulin, Moskva: Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2012, p. 664-683Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Muslim women in Russia: becoming full members of society2012In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, Vol. 3-4, p. 60-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Opening the (Muslim) woman's space-The Soviet politics of emancipation in the 1920s-1930s2020In: Ethnicities, ISSN 1468-7968, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 667-684, article id UNSP 1468796820905030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emancipation of the woman of the East constituted an important part of the Soviet cultural revolution campaign of the 1920s-1930s. This article has as its aim the exploration of the Soviet discourses and the practices of emancipation of the woman of the East, with a focus on the Muslim woman of the Volga-Ural region. I show that the Bolshevik attempts at transforming the everyday life of the woman of the East, in spite of their anti-colonial rhetoric, often followed the Russian imperial scripts and the logic of the civilizing mission. In contrast to Muslim modernism's ideas on the compatibility of modernity with Islam, the Bolshevik secular and declaratively ungendered modernity aimed for the destruction of the separateness of male and female spaces and their conversion to the common space of the communist collectivity. However, the discourse on the special backwardness and slave-like situations of the Muslim woman contradicted these aspirations and led to her Otherness rather than emancipation and equality inside the Soviet system.

  • 7.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Regional Ombudsmen, Human Rights and Women - Gender Aspects of the Social and Legal Transformation in North-West Russia (Based on Ombudsman Reports)2012In: The Soviet and Post-Soviet Review, ISSN 1075-1262, E-ISSN 1876-3324, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 84-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the center of the article is the new regional ombudsman institution in Russia and its activities vis-à-vis the protection of women’s rights. The article seeks to analyze how complaints filed by women are presented and how the status of women’s rights within the context of human rights is described in the ombudsmen’s annual reports. The analysis of the reports proves ambiguities of interpretations of human rights; it also shows that many of those filing complaints do it because of the violations of social and civil rights, and that the majority of those experiencing discrimination are women. However, in most of the cases the ombudspersons do not pay attention to the gender-specific dimensions of the discrimination nor have they identified this as an important problem in contemporary Russian society. This situation is connected with the absence of a legal or political mechanism for gender equality in Russia as well as a displacement of women’s rights issues in favor of a focus on family issues and demography in the Russian public discourse of the late 2000s.

  • 8.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Review of  Dilemmas of Diversity after the Cold War: Analysis of "Cultural Differences" by US and Russia-based Scholars.   Edited by Michele Rivkin-Fish and Elena Trubina.  Washington, 20102012In: Ab Imperio, ISSN 2166-4072, p. 457-462Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Speaking for Those "Backward": Gender and Ethnic Minoritiesin Soviet Silent Films2013In: Region: Regional Studies of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia, ISSN 2166-4307, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 201-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article is dedicated to the study of the cinematographic representations of two early Soviet emancipation projects: the emancipation of women and the emancipation of national minorities. In what ways did these two emancipation projects intersect? How were women of the “dominated” nations addressed and treated in the post-revolutionary years? In order to answer these questions I analyze three newsreels and six thematic films connected to the mentioned topics and produced between the mid-1920s and 1931. Films dealing with the “emancipation” of women not infrequently showed women from different regions, but, in addition to this intra-Soviet perspective on an all-Soviet dimension, I focus on several films dealing with the Volga-Ural region in particular. Soviet films from 1920 to the early 1930s give us more complex and multilateral information about both “emancipations” than do other Soviet documents. At the same time, they show that racialized images of “other” women were frequently used by Soviet filmmakers in order to emphasize the progress of the Soviet modernizing project.

  • 10.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The WIDF's Work for Women's Rights in the (Post)colonial Countries and the "Soviet Agenda"2022In: International Review of Social History, ISSN 0020-8590, E-ISSN 1469-512X, Vol. 67, no S30, p. 155-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The primary aim of this article is to problematize the WIDF's interpretations of the rights of women from (post)colonial countries and its tactics in working for and together with these women. It shows that, in the context of rapid geopolitical changes - the growing anti-colonial struggle and Cold War competition - the WIDF had to change its ideology, ways of working, and communication strategies in order to keep its leading position in transnational work for women's rights and to maintain the sympathies of women from countries outside Europe. The main focus is on the contradictions, negotiations, and adjustments inside the WIDF with respect to the new political situation and the demands of women from Africa and Asia, in particular, during the highest period of anticolonial transformation (1950s to early 1970s). This article also pays attention to Soviet ideas on the emancipation of women and, in particular, to the influence of Soviet experiences of emancipating women from non-Slavic (Eastern and Southern) parts of the USSR on the WIDF's perception of and policies for the improvement of the situation of women in Asia and Africa. This article is based primarily on analysis of the WIDF's archival documents preserved in the State Archive of the Russian Federation (GARF) in Moscow, along with the WIDF's official publications.

  • 11.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Women's International Democratic Federation, the Global South and the Cold War: Defending the Rights of Women of the 'Whole World'?2020Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the role of the Women's International Defense Federation (WIDF) in transnational women’s activism in the context of the Cold War, and in connection to the rights of women from Asia, Africa and Latin America.

    Combining a global history and postcolonial theory approach, this monograph shines light on an underrepresented organisation and its important role in the Cold War, Twentieth Century women's rights and Soviet history. Questioning whether the organization acted for women’s causes or whether it was merely a Cold War political instrument, the book analyzes and problematizes the place that the WIDF had in the politics of the Soviet Union, examining the ideology and politics of the WIDF and state socialist propaganda regarding women's equality and rights. Using Soviet archival documents of the organizations, the book offers a new perspective on the complexities of the development of global women’s rights movement divided by the Cold War confrontations.

    This is an important study suitable for students and researchers in Women's and Gender History, Eastern European History and Gender Studies.

  • 12.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Turism till Sovjetiska Östern: mellan en förflutet rysk imperium och sovjetisk modernitet2018In: Turismhistoria i Norden / [ed] Wiebke Kolbe, Uppsala: Kungl. Gustav Adolfs Akademien för svensk folkkultur , 2018, p. 71-84Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Women’s international Democratic Federation, the ‘Third World’ and the Global Cold War from the late-1950s to the mid-1960s2020In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583X, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 270-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the work of the Women's International Democratic Federation (WIDF) with women from Africa, Asia and Latin America. It analyzes their role in the WIDF's decision-making process and activities during a period marked by decolonization and the intensification of women's rights activism outside Europe. This analysis contributes to a better understanding of the extent to which the WIDF's official position on support for the rights of women in the Global South was translated into the practical work of organization. The article is based on materials from Moscow archives that have hitherto not been explored in research on the WIDF. It shows that, in spite of the WIDF's formal anti-colonial stance, women from the Global South were not always given a voice or able to insert their demands into WIDF policy.

  • 14.
    Gradskova, Yulia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Sandomirskaja, Irina
    Petrusenko, Nadezda
    Pussy Riot, Reflections on Receptions: Some Questions Concerning Public Reactions in Russia to the Pussy Riot's Intervention and Trial2013In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, E-ISSN 2001-7308, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This text is not an analytical article, nor a proper academic paper, but rather a conversation, a dialogue for three voices. It was originally presented at a seminar at Södertörn university and it has no intention of summing up things in any definitive way. On the contrary, we were writing about our observations in a free manner, discussing with each other in the process, reflecting on the critique from our colleagues, and commenting on each other contributions, supporting or questioning each other’s points of view in an informal manner. These mutual comments are linked to the text below in suitable places and marked with our initials. We are also including some pictures that we thought we needed for our presentations and that were very difficult to select in the ocean of visual images illustrating the case of Pussy Riot and the public’s reaction to it. After having produced about forty pages, we realized we have to stop if we do not want this conversation to continue indefinitely. But we do not consider that it is over. We hope that it will be continued by our readers.

  • 15.
    Gradskova, Yuliya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Свобода как Принуждение?: Совeтское наступление на “закрепощение женщины” и наследие империи (середина 1920 – начало 1930-х гг., Волго Уральский регион)2013In: Ab Imperio: Theory and History of Nationalities and Nationalism in the post-Soviet Realm, ISSN 2166-4072, E-ISSN 2164-9731, no 4, p. 113-144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the cross-section of gender differences and colonial/imperial differences on the example of the Soviet campaign of emancipation of the minority women in the Volga-Ural region during the 1920s and early 1930s. Drawing from Soviet publications and archival documents on the Commission for the Improvement of Work and Everyday Life of Women, the article shows that in spite of its emancipatory potential, the official campaign censored alternative projects of women's emancipation that had emerged in the region before the Bolshevik revolution. At the same time, the institutionalized campaign for women's equality privileged female activists on ideological rather than ethnic grounds. However, the existing structure of socialization in reality promoted mainly those of Russian and in general, Slavic background, thus reifying the old colonial disposition.

1 - 15 of 15
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf