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  • 1.
    Dury, Jack
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Savinetsky, Arkady
    Dobrovolskaya, Maria
    Dneprovsky, Kiril
    Harris, Alison J. T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of York, UK.
    van der Plicht, Johannes
    Jordan, Peter
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Species-specific reservoir effect estimates: A case study of archaeological marine samples from the Bering Strait2022In: The Holocene, ISSN 0959-6836, E-ISSN 1477-0911, Vol. 32, no 11, p. 1209-1221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the marine reservoir effect, radiocarbon dates of marine samples require a correction. Marine reservoir effects, however, may vary among different marine species within a given body of water. Factors such as diet, feeding depth and migratory behaviour all affect the 14C date of a marine organism. Moreover, there is often significant variation within single marine species. Whilst the careful consideration of the ΔR values of a single marine species in a given location is important, so too is the full range of ΔR values within an ecosystem. This paper illustrates this point, using a sample pairing method to estimate the reservoir effects in 17 marine samples, of eight different species, from the archaeological site of Ekven (Eastern Chukotka, Siberia). An OxCal model is used to assess the strength of these estimates. The marine reservoir effects of samples passing the model range from ΔR (Marine20) = 136 ± 41–ΔR = 460 ± 40. Marine reservoir effect estimates of these samples and other published samples are used to explore variability in the wider Bering Strait region. The archaeological implications of this variability are also discussed. The calibrating of 14C dates from human bone collagen, for example, could be improved by applying a dietary relevant marine reservoir effect correction. For humans from the site of Ekven, a ΔR (Marine20) correction of 289 ± 124 years or reservoir age correction of 842 ± 123 years is suggested. 

  • 2.
    Dury, Jack
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Savinetsky, Arkady
    Dobrovolskaya, Maria
    Dneprovsky, Kiril
    Harris, Alison
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    van der Plicht, Johannes
    Jordan, Peter
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Addressing the Chronology of the Ekven Mortuary Site (Chukotka, Russia)2021Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Dury, Jack
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Harris, Alison J. T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of York, UK.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Dental wiggle matching: Radiocarbon modelling of micro-sampled archaeological human dentine2021In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 595, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine reservoir effects (MRE) have the potential to increase the dating uncertainty of humans incorporating marine resources into their diets. Here we attempt a novel dental wiggle-match model to reduce dating uncertainty of seven individuals from the Resmo megalithic tomb (Öland, Sweden) and to test whether this model can be used to calculate MRE from a single tooth. Previous stable isotope ratio studies of these individuals demonstrated that their diets changed, between more or less marine protein, during the early years of their lives. Several incremental samples of dentine from each individual were subjected to radiocarbon dating and stable isotope ratio analysis. An OxCal model was designed that makes use of the known formation sequence of human teeth to reduce overall dating uncertainty. The new dental wiggle-match model is able to reduce overall dating uncertainty in all of the sampled individuals compared to more conventional 14C calibration methods. A utility of the dental wiggle model to estimate marine reservoir effects without associated faunal material is also demonstrated, with promising results.

  • 4.
    Dury, Jack P. R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fjellström, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Wallerström, Thomas
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    CONSIDERATION OF FRESHWATER AND MULTIPLE MARINE RESERVOIR EFFECTS: DATING OF INDIVIDUALS WITH MIXED DIETS FROM NORTHERN SWEDEN2018In: Radiocarbon, ISSN 0033-8222, E-ISSN 1945-5755, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 1561-1585Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human burials from the cemetery at the Rounala church, northern Sweden, were radiocarbon (C-14) dated to shed light on the use of the cemetery. Carbon, nitrogen and sulfur stable isotope analysis of bone collagen from 19 distinct individuals indicated that these individuals had a mixed diet consisting of freshwater, marine and terrestrial resources. Dietary modeling using FRUITS was employed to calculate the contributions of the different resources for each individual. These data were then used to calculate individual Delta R values, taking into account freshwater and multiple marine reservoir effects, the latter caused by Baltic and Atlantic marine dietary inputs, respectively. C-14 dating of tissues from modern freshwater fish species demonstrate a lack of a freshwater reservoir effect in the area. Two OxCal models were used to provide endpoint age estimates. The calibrated data suggest that the site's cemetery was most likely in use already from the 14th century, and perhaps until at least the late 18th century.

  • 5.
    Dury, Jack P. R.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Harris, Alison J. T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of York, United Kingdom.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Dental wiggle matching: Radiocarbon modelling of sub-sampled archaeological human dentine2021In: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 595, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine reservoir effects (MRE) have the potential to increase the dating uncertainty of humans incorporating marine resources into their diets. Here we attempt a novel dental wiggle-match model to reduce dating uncertainty of seven individuals from the Resmo megalithic tomb (Öland, Sweden) and to test whether this model can be used to calculate MRE from a single tooth. Previous stable isotope ratio studies of these individuals demonstrated that their diets changed, between more or less marine protein, during the early years of their lives. Several incremental samples of dentine from each individual were subjected to radiocarbon dating and stable isotope ratio analysis. An OxCal model was designed that makes use of the known formation sequence of human teeth to reduce overall dating uncertainty. The new dental wiggle-match model is able to reduce overall dating uncertainty in all of the sampled individuals compared to more conventional 14C calibration methods. A utility of the dental wiggle model to estimate marine reservoir effects without associated faunal material is also demonstrated, with promising results.

  • 6.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Analysis of human skeletal remains from Sømmevågen, Sola, Rogaland, Norway2018Report (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution.
    Immigrant, returnee or commuter?2007In: On the Road: Studies in honour of Lars Larsson / [ed] Hårdh, B, Jennbert, K. & Olausson, D., Almqvist & Wiksell International, Stockholm , 2007, p. 188-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalys av ett humanben från Brunstad konferansesenter, Stokke, Vestfold, Norge2015Report (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Kanaljorden 3:1, Motala stad, RAÄ 187, Östergötland2017Report (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Strandvägen, Motala, RAÄ 290, Östergötland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av humant skelettmaterial från Stora Uppåkra, Uppåkra sn, Skåne2011Report (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av material från Jävre och Luleå i Norrbotten2015Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol- och kväveisotopanalyser av humant material från Gnista, Danmark sn, Uppland2015Report (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Part-time farmers or hard-core sealers?: Västerbjers studied by means of stable isotope analysis2004In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 135-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Slutrapport över isotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Strandvägen, Motala, RAÄ 290, Östergötland2018Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for the Study of Cultural Evolution. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of human and faunal remains from Zvejnieki2006In: Back to the origin: New research in the mesolithic-neolithic Zvejniek cemetery and environment, Northern Latvia / [ed] Larsson, Lars & Zagorska, Ilga, Almqvist & Wiksell , 2006, p. 183-215Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope nalysis of human faunal remains from Zvejnieki Stone Age complex revealed a considerable input of freswater fish in the diet of people buried at Zvejnieki. This emphasison freshwater fish diminished in the Late Neoltithic and Bronze Age periods.

  • 17.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Stable isotope analysis of humans2013In: The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial / [ed] Tarlow, Sarah & Nilsson Stutz, Liv, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, p. 123-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Stable isotope analyses of skeletal remains have become increasingly important within the field of archaeology during the past few decades. Given that the analyses can (under certain circumstances) provide direct data at the individual level regarding, for example, subsistence, actual consumption of specific foodstuffs, the transition from foraging to farming, breastfeeding patterns, mobility, migration and contact with other groups, this is not surprising. This chapter provides an overview of the kind of archaeological issues that can be addressed with the use of stable isotope analyses, based on four of the most commonly used light elements (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulphur), with an emphasis on carbon and nitrogen. The applications are illustrated with examples from various parts of the world, ranging from Pleistocene to Medieval date. It also deals with how and why the analyses work, and bring up some methodological limitations and potential pitfalls.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Karin Margarita
    Howcroft, Rachel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Gummesson, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Molin, Fredrik
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Frei, Robert
    Hallgren, Fredrik
    Diet and mobility among Mesolithic hunter-gatherers in Motala (Sweden) - The isotope perspective2018In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, p. 904-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent excavations at the sites of Strandvägen and Kanaljorden in Motala, Eastern Central Sweden, have unearthed complex and varied funerary remains from the Mesolithic. The two sites are situated on opposite banks of the river Motala Ström. While geographically close and roughly covering the same time span (c. 8000–7000 cal. BP), the funerary remains reveal differences and similarities in the treatment of the dead between the two localities. While at Strandvägen human bones were mostly found either scattered along the river bed or in inhumation graves, Kanaljorden contains wetland depositions of disarticulated skulls. We have conducted multi-isotope analyses of δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87Sr/86Sr of human and animal remains with the aim of reconstructing the dietary patterns, geographic provenance and mobility of the interred. A series of faunal reference samples and, in the case of 87Sr/86Sr, soil samples have been analysed in order to establish relevant isotopic baselines. The results show a protein intake dominated by aquatic resources, probably consisting of both freshwater and marine fish in varied proportions. The strontium isotope data indicate an interesting distinction between the individuals buried on either side of the river Motala Ström. Five out of six sampled individuals from Strandvägen have isotope ratios consistent with a local provenance, whereas ratios from seven out of eight Kanaljorden individuals indicate a non-local origin. The δ34S analysis proved problematic as a majority of the samples appear to be affected by diagenesis. This is probably the result of contamination by exogenous sulphur from surrounding fluvial and lacustrine sediments, as has previously been reported from other waterlogged sites.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dietary life histories in Stone Age Northern Europe2013In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 288-302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present here a framework for using stable isotope analysis of bone and teeth to study individual life history. A sampling strategy and analytical approach for stable carbon and nitrogen analysis of bone and dentine collagen optimised for intra-individual purposes is put forward. The rationale behind this strategy, various requirements and constrains, and recommendations on how to modify it according to variations in material and analytical instrumentation, are discussed and explained in detail. Based on intra-individual data for 131 human individuals from Mesolithic and Neolithic sites in Northern Europe, we consider the sources and various kinds of variation one is likely to find, and how the data can be explained and transformed into an archaeologically meaningful interpretation. It is concluded that the use of stable isotope analysis to trace individual life history is not limited to carefully excavated, neatly preserved, single burials with articulate skeletal remains. Even collective burials, disturbed graves, disarticulated human remains in cultural layers, or other depositions that deviate from what is often considered as a proper burial, offer the possibility to look at individual life biographies.

  • 20.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Linderholm, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fornander, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kanstrup, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schoultz, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Olofsson, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Same island, different diet: Cultural evolution of food practice on Öland, Sweden, from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period2008In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 520-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mesolithic–Neolithic transition in north-west Europe has been described as rapid and uniform, entailing a swift shift from the use of marine and other wild resources to domesticated terrestrial resources. Here, we approach the when, what and how of this transition on a regional level, using empirical data from Öland, an island in the Baltic Sea off the Swedish east coast, and also monitor changes that occurred after the shift. Radiocarbon dating and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses of bones and teeth from 123 human individuals, along with faunal isotope data from 27 species, applying to nine sites on Öland and covering a time span from the Mesolithic to the Roman Period, demonstrate a great diversity in food practices, mainly governed by culture and independent of climatic changes. There was a marked dietary shift during the second half of the third millennium from a mixed marine diet to the use of exclusively terrestrial resources, interpreted as marking the large-scale introduction of farming. Contrary to previous claims, this took place at the end of the Neolithic and not at the onset. Our data also show that culturally induced dietary transitions occurred continuously throughout prehistory. The availability of high-resolution data on various levels, from intra-individual to inter-population, makes stable isotope analysis a powerful tool for studying the evolution of food practices.

  • 21.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Papmehl-Dufay, Ludvig
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Cultural interaction and change: a multi-isotopic approach to the Neolithization in coastal areas2013In: World archaeology, ISSN 0043-8243, E-ISSN 1470-1375, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 430-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on data from the megalithic tomb in Resmo on oland in the Baltic Sea, we use a multi-isotopic approach, involving the systematic treatment and modelling of extensive human and faunal isotopic data (C-14, C-13, N-15, S-34 and Sr-87/Sr-86), along with archaeological contextual evidence, to study change and interaction. The fact that people utilize aquatic resources necessitates modelling of the sulphur and strontium isotope data, to prevent the aquatic contribution from obscuring the local terrestrial signal. It was possible to demonstrate how the people buried in Resmo went through dynamic changes in diet, mobility patterns and cultural identity during more than two millennia of burial practice: from the incipient farmers of the Funnel Beaker Culture, through the cultural encounters and transitions during the Middle Neolithic, to the newcomers furthering intensified agriculture, trade and metal craftsmanship during the Bronze Age.

  • 22.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Zagorska, I
    Do dogs eat like humans?: Marine stable isotope signals in dog teeth from inland Zvejnieki2002In: Mesolithic on the Move: Papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on The Mesolithic in Europe, Stockholm 2000, Stockholm: International Conference on the Mesolithic in Europe , 2002, p. 160-168Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Isotopanalyser av kvinnan i Gransjögraven,Gransjön, Frostviken sn, Jämtland2012Report (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humana individer, samt animalt skelettmaterial från Götes mack, Sigtuna Raä 195:1, Sigtuna stad, Uppland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Dominikanerkonventet, Västerås stad, Västmanland2014Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av humant och animalt skelettmaterial från Önsvala, Staffanstorp sn, Skåne2013Report (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Kol-, kväve- och svavelisotopanalyser av sex humana individer, samt animalt skelettmaterial från Dominikanerkonventet, Västerås stad, Västmanland2016Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Angerbjorn, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Approaching historic reindeer herding in Northern Sweden by stable isotope analysis2020In: Journal of Nordic Archaeological Science, ISSN 1650-1519, Vol. 19, p. 63-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A strong cultural connection exists between reindeer and modern Sámi identityand economy. Reindeer domestication is, however, a rather late event, andthere are many Sámi who live off resources other than reindeer herding. Theuse of stable isotope analysis on historic reindeer from different geographicareas can contribute to analysing both the processes involved in reindeer domesticationand different environmental utilization by the Sámi. In this study,reindeer bones from six different sites in northern Sweden, ranging in datefrom the 11th to the 20th century, were analysed for stable isotopes to studyhow reindeer have been utilized in various historic contexts – settlements,offering sites and a marketplace. The stable isotope analysis demonstrateddifferent practices in utilization of reindeer, such as foddering. Foddering issuggested to have caused the elevated δ15N values found in reindeer at theoffering sites Vindelgransele and Unna Saiva, as well as at the settlementVivallen. The analysis further indicates that the offering sites were used bysingle Sámi groups. An important outcome of our study is that the biologyof reindeer in Sápmi was culturally influenced by the Sámi even before thereindeer was domesticated.

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  • 29.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Fishing at Vivallen – stable isotope analysis of a south Sámi burial ground2022In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 117, no 1, p. 37-57Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vivallen is a Late Iron Age/Early Middle Ages South Saami site with a burial ground as well as a large dwelling site in Härjedalen, Sweden, located in the borderland between Saami and Norse groups. As food can be used as an indicator of cultural affiliation, we investigated the relative importance of various foodstuffs at this site, performing δ13C and δ15N analysis of human and faunal skeletal remains. The site was located along the St Olaf pilgrimage route, implying that some of the buried individuals may not have been local to the site, and therefore we performed δ34S analysis to study mobility. We set out to investigate if there were any changes in diet and mobility over the lifespan of the people buried at Vivallen. The results showed that freshwater fish were an important part of the diet, whereas reindeer and big game do not seem to have been major protein sources. We could not identify any substantial changes in diet in the individuals over time. Our results further demonstrated low mobility among the individuals, with one exception, a female who evidently grew up somewhere else.

  • 30.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Svestad, Asgeir
    Food and Cultural Traits in Coastal Northern Finnmark in the 14th-19th Centuries2019In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 20-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we used stable isotope analysis and radiocarbon dating to study diet, mobility and chronology in two late medieval/historical coastal populations in northern Norway. We have shown that the individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya date between 1331 and 1953 cal AD and had a homogenous marine diet, whereas the individuals buried at Gullholmen had a more heterogeneous diet, consisting of both terrestrial and marine proteins and date between 1661 and 1953 cal AD. We have demonstrated that reindeer protein was not an important part of their diet, and also discussed the importance of correcting for the marine reservoir effect in populations with a coastal subsistence. Our interpretation is that individuals buried at Kirkegardsoya primarily belonged to a Coastal Sami community, although Norwegians with a similar diet (and likely comprising a minor population in the area) cannot be ruled out. The more varied diet and mobility at Gullholmen could, as predicted, indicate that these individuals may have had a more diverse cultural affinity.

  • 31.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lindgren, Åsa
    Lopez-Costas, Olalla
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Food, mobility and health in an Arctic 17th-18th century mining populationIn: Arctic, ISSN 0004-0843, E-ISSN 1923-1245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The silver mine of Nasafjäll and the smeltery site in Silbojokk in Swedish Sápmi were established in 1635 and was used during several phases until the late 19th century. Excavations in Silbojokk, c. 40 km from Nasafjäll have revealed buildings, such as a smeltery, living houses, a bakery, a church with a churchyard. Already at the start, both local and non-local individuals worked at the mine and the smel-tery. Non-locals were recruited to work in the mine and at the smel-tery, and the local Sámi population was recruited to transport the sil-ver down to the Swedish coast. Females, males and children of differ-ent ages were represented among the individuals buried at the church-yard in Silbojokk, used between c. 1635 and 1770. Here we study diet, mobility and exposure to lead in the smeltery workers, the miners and the local population. By employing isotopic analysis, δ13C, δ15N, δ34S, 87/86Sr and elemental composition, we have demonstrated that individ-uals in Silbojokk had a homogenous diet, except for two individuals. In addition, there were local and non-local individuals, and all of them were exposed to lead, that in some cases could have caused death. The environment at Nasafjäll and Silbojokk is still highly toxic.

  • 32.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lindgren, Åsa
    López-Costas, Olalla
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Food, Mobility, and Health in a 17th and 18th Century Arctic Mining Population in Silbojokk, Swedish Sapmi2021In: Arctic, ISSN 0004-0843, E-ISSN 1923-1245, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 113-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Established in 1635, the silver mine of Nasafjall and the smeltery site in Silbojokk in Swedish Sapmi were used during several phases until the late 19th century. Excavations in Silbojokk, c. 40 km from Nasafjall, have revealed buildings such as a smeltery, living houses, a bakery, and a church with a churchyard. From the beginning, both local and non-local individuals worked at the mine and the smeltery. Non-locals were recruited to work in the mine and at the smeltery, and the local Semi population was recruited to transport the silver down to the Swedish coast. Females, males, and children of different ages were represented among the individuals buried at the churchyard in Silbojokk, which was used between c. 1635 and 1770. Here we study diet, mobility, and exposure to lead (Pb) in the smeltery workers, the miners, and the local population. By employing isotopic analysis, delta C-13, delta N-15, delta S-34, Sr-87/Sr-86 and elemental analysis, we demonstrate that individuals in Silbojokk had a homogenous diet, except for two individuals. In addition, both local and non-local individuals were all exposed to Pb, which in some cases could have been harmful to their health.

  • 33.
    Fjellström, Markus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wathen, Crista Adelle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Patriksdotter, Amanda
    Seehusen, Nina
    Granbom Garcia, Joel
    Älmeby, Niclas
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Intra-individual diet- and mobility data from the population interred at the Västerhus Church groundsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Wild at heart: Approaching Pitted Ware identity, economy and cosmology through stable isotopes in skeletal material from the Neolithic site Korsnäs in Eastern Central Sweden2008In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 281-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Middle Neolithic Pitted Ware Culture on the Baltic Sea islands comprised a common identity distinguished, in part, by an almost exclusively marine diet. Based on evidence from the first stable isotope analysis on Pitted Ware skeletal material from the Eastern Central Swedish mainland, we suggest that this identity was shared by PWC groups in the archipelago of the west side of the Baltic. Fifty-six faunal and 26 human bone and dentine samples originating from the Pitted Ware site Korsnäs in Södermanland, Sweden were analysed, and the data clearly shows that the diet of the Korsnäs people was marine, predominantly based on seal. The isotope data further indicate that the pig bones found in large quantities on the site emanate from wild boar rather than domestic pigs. The large representation of pig on several Pitted Ware sites, which cannot be explained in terms of economy, is interpreted as the results of occasional hunting of and ritual feasting on wild boar, indicating that the animal held a prominent position, alongside seal, in the hunting identity and cosmology of the Pitted Ware people. Further, eleven new radiocarbon dates are presented, placing the Korsnäs site, with a large probability, within Middle Neolithic A.

  • 35.
    Fornander, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Andersson, Per
    Identifying mobility in populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets: strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material from a passage grave in Resmo, Öland, Sweden2015In: Forging identities: the mobility of culture in bronze age Europe. Report from a Marie Curie project 2009-2012 with concluding conference at Aarhus University, Moesgaard 2012 / [ed] Paulina Suchowska-Ducke, Samantha Scott Reiter, Helle Vandkilde, Oxford: British Archaeological Reports , 2015, p. 183-192Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Strontium isotope analysis of skeletal material as a means to reconstruct prehistoric residential patterns has previously mainly been applied to populations with terrestrial diets. Here we present a model for populations with mixed marine/terrestrial diets, which is based on two-component mixing of strontium isotopes. Applying this model, we can estimate the original strontium isotope value of the terrestrial component of the diet. Accordingly it is possible to identify non-local individuals even if they had a mixed marine/terrestrial diet. The model is applied to tooth enamel samples representing nine individuals recovered from a passage grave in Resmo, on the island of Öland in the Baltic Sea, where at least five non-local individuals, representing at least two different geographical regions of origin, were identified. Non-local individuals were more frequent during the Bronze Age than during previous phases.

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  • 36. Gharibi, Hassan
    et al.
    Chernobrovkin, Alexey L.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Saei, Amir Ata
    Timmons, Zena
    Kitchener, Andrew C.
    Kalthoff, Daniela C.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Makarov, Alexander A.
    Zubarev, Roman A.
    Abnormal (Hydroxy)proline Deuterium Content Redefines Hydrogen Chemical Mass2022In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 144, no 6, p. 2484-2487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyzing the delta H-2 values in individual amino acids of proteins extracted from vertebrates, we unexpectedly found in some samples, notably bone collagen from seals, more than twice as much deuterium in proline and hydroxyproline residues than in seawater. This corresponds to at least 4 times higher delta H-2 than in any previously reported biogenic sample. We ruled out diet as a plausible mechanism for such anomalous enrichment. This finding puts into question the old adage that you are what you eat.

  • 37.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Osteoarchaeological Research Laboratory.
    Schmitt, M.
    Kooijman, E.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Intra- and inter-tooth variation in strontium isotope ratios from prehistoric seals by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry2018In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, ISSN 0951-4198, E-ISSN 1097-0231, Vol. 32, no 15, p. 1215-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RationaleStrontium isotope ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86) in modern-day marine environments are considered to be homogeneous (0.7092). However, in the Baltic Sea, the Sr ratios are controlled by mixing seawater and continental drainage from major rivers discharging into the Baltic. This pilot study explores if variations in Sr can be detected in marine mammals from archaeological sites in the Baltic Sea. Methods(87)Sr/Sr-86 ratios were measured in tooth enamel from three seal species by laser ablation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS). The method enables micro-sampling of solid materials. This is the first time that the method has been applied to marine samples from archaeological collections. ResultsThe analyses showed inter-tooth Sr-87/Sr-86 variation suggesting that different ratios can be detected in different regions of the Baltic Sea. Furthermore, the intra-tooth variation suggests possible different geographic origin or seasonal movement of seals within different regions in the Baltic Sea through their lifetime. ConclusionsThe method was successfully applied to archaeological marine samples showing that: (1) the Sr-87/Sr-86 ratio in marine environments is not uniform, (2) Sr-87/Sr-86 differences might reflect differences in ecology and life history of different seal species, and (3) archaeological mobility studies based on Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios in humans should therefore be evaluated together with diet reconstruction.

  • 38.
    Glykou, Aikaterini
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Lõugas, Lembi
    Piličiauskienė, Giedrė
    Schmölcke, Ulrich
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Reconstructing the ecological history of the extinct harp seal population of the Baltic Sea2021In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 251, article id 106701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), today a subarctic species with breeding populations in the White Sea, around the Jan Mayen Islands and Newfoundland, was a common pinniped species in the Baltic Sea during the mid- and late Holocene. It is puzzling how an ice dependent species could breed in the Baltic Sea during the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM), and it remains unclear for how long harp seals bred in the Baltic Sea and when the population became extirpated. We combined radiocarbon dating of harp seal bones with zooarchaeological, palaeoenvironmental and stable isotope data to reconstruct the harp seal occurrence in the Baltic Sea. Our study revealed two phases of harp seal presence and verifies that the first colonization and establishment of a local breeding population occurred within the HTM. We suggest that periods with very warm summers but cold winters allowed harp seals to breed on the ice. Human pressure, salinity fluctuations with consequent changes in prey availability and competition for food resources, mainly cod, resulted in physiological stress that ultimately led to a population decline and local extirpation during the first phase. The population reappeared after a long hiatus. Final extinction of the Baltic Sea harp seal coincided with the Medieval Warm Period. Our data provide insights for the first time on the combined effects of past climatic and environmental change and human pressure on seal populations and can contribute with new knowledge on ongoing discussions concerning the impacts of such effects on current arctic seal populations.

  • 39. Günther, Torsten
    et al.
    Malmström, Helena
    Svensson, Emma M.
    Omrak, Ayça
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Sánchez-Quinto, Federico
    Kılınç, Gülşah M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Uppsala University, Sweden; Middle East Technical University, Turkey.
    Krzewińska, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Fraser, Magdalena
    Edlund, Hanna
    Munters, Arielle R.
    Coutinho, Alexandra
    Simões, Luciana G.
    Vicente, Mario
    Sjölander, Anders
    Jansen Sellevold, Berit
    Jørgensen, Roger
    Claes, Peter
    Shriver, Mark D.
    Valdiosera, Cristina
    Netea, Mihai G.
    Apel, Jan
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Skar, Birgitte
    Storå, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Götherström, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
    Jakobsson, Mattias
    Population genomics of Mesolithic Scandinavia: Investigating early postglacial migration routes and high-latitude adaptation2018In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, no 1, article id e2003703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scandinavia was one of the last geographic areas in Europe to become habitable for humans after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, the routes and genetic composition of these postglacial migrants remain unclear. We sequenced the genomes, up to 57x coverage, of seven hunter-gatherers excavated across Scandinavia and dated from 9,500-6,000 years before present (BP). Surprisingly, among the Scandinavian Mesolithic individuals, the genetic data display an east-west genetic gradient that opposes the pattern seen in other parts of Mesolithic Europe. Our results suggest two different early postglacial migrations into Scandinavia: initially from the south, and later, from the northeast. The latter followed the ice-free Norwegian north Atlantic coast, along which novel and advanced pressure-blade stone-tool techniques may have spread. These two groups met and mixed in Scandinavia, creating a genetically diverse population, which shows patterns of genetic adaptation to high latitude environments. These potential adaptations include high frequencies of low pigmentation variants and a gene region associated with physical performance, which shows strong continuity into modern-day northern Europeans.

  • 40.
    Harris, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Feuerborn, Tatiana Richtman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Sinding, Mikkel
    Nottingham, James
    Knudsen, Robert
    Rey-Iglesia, Alba
    Schmidt, Anne-Lisbeth
    Appelt, Martin
    Grønnow, Bjarne
    Alexander, Michelle
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Archives of human-dog relationships: Genetic and stable isotope analysis of Arctic fur clothingManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Harris, Alison J. T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of York, UK; Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
    Elliott, Deirdre A.
    Guiry, Eric J.
    Von Tersch, Matthew
    Rankin, Lisa
    Whitridge, Peter
    Alexander, Michelle
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Grimes, Vaughan
    Diversity in Labrador Inuit sled dog diets: Insights from δ13C and δ15N analysis of dog bone and dentine collagen2020In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 32, article id 102424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sled dogs were an integral part of Labrador Inuit life from the initial expansion and settlement of northeastern Canada to the present day. Tasked with pulling sleds and assisting people with other subsistence activities in the winter, dogs required regular provisioning with protein and fat. In this paper, we conduct stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of the skeletal remains of dogs (n=35) and wild fauna (n=68) from sites located on the north and south coasts of Labrador to characterize dog provisioning between the 15th to early 19th centuries. In addition, we analyse bone (n=20) and dentine (n=4) collagen from dogs from Double Mer Point, a communal house site in Hamilton Inlet to investigate how dog diets intersected with Inuit subsistence and trade activities at a local level. We find that dog diets were largely composed of marine mammal protein, but that dogs on the north coast consumed more caribou and fish relative to dogs from the central and south coast sites. The diets of dogs from Double Mer Point were the most heterogenous of any site, suggesting long-distance movement of people and/or animals along the coast.

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  • 42.
    Harris, Alison J. T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of York, United Kingdom.
    Feuerborn, Tatiana Richtman
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Copenhagen, Denmark; Swedish Museum of Natural History, Sweden.
    Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.
    Nottingham, James
    Knudsen, Robert
    Rey-Iglesia, Alba
    Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth
    Appelt, Martin
    Grønnow, Bjarne
    Alexander, Michelle
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Dalén, Love
    Hansen, Anders J.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archives of human-dog relationships: Genetic and stable isotope analysis of Arctic fur clothing2020In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 59, article id 101200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among Indigenous populations of the Arctic, domestic dogs (Canislupus familiaris) were social actors aiding in traction and subsistence activities. Less commonly, dogs fulfilled a fur-bearing role in both the North American and Siberian Arctic. Examples of garments featuring dog skins were collected during the 19th-20th centuries and are now curated by the National Museum of Denmark. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of macroscopically identified dog skin garments. We conducted stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of the dog furs and of fur samples from contemporaneous pelts of Arctic (C. lupus arctos) and grey (C. lupus) wolves. Despite the presence of biocides used to protect the fur clothing during storage, we extracted well-preserved DNA using a minimally-invasive sampling protocol. Unexpectedly, the mtDNA genomes of one-third of the samples were consistent with wild taxa, rather than domestic dogs. The strong marine component in the diets of North American dogs distinguished them from Greenland and Canadian wolves, but Siberian dogs consumed diets that were isotopically similar to wild species. We found that dog provisioning practices were variable across the Siberian and North American Arctic, but in all cases, involved considerable human labor.

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  • 43.
    Harris, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of York, UK .
    Talbot, Helen
    Collins, Matthew
    Taylor, Sheila
    Penkman, Kirsty
    von Tersch, Matthew
    Rankin, Lisa
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Craig, Oliver
    Alexander, Michelle
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    An improved extraction protocol for humic-contaminated bone collagen: Experimental evidence and insights from humic acid chemistryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Harris, Alison
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of York, UK .
    Talbot, Helen
    von Tersch, Matthew
    Dury, Jack
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Soncin, Silvia
    Dobrovolskaya, Maria
    Dneprovsky, Kirill
    Britton, Kate
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Alexander, Michelle
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Craig, Oliver
    Feeding infants at the Arctic Circle: Incremental isotope analysis of dentine and amino acids of Bering Sea hunter-gatherersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Amningsmönster under järnålder på södra Öland2015In: Grävda minnen: Från Skedemosse till Sandby borg / [ed] Kjell-Håkan Arnell, Ludvig Papmehl-Dufay, Kalmar: Kalmar läns museum, Länsstyrelsen Kalmar län , 2015, p. 72-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Conformity in diversity? Isotopic investigations of infant feeding practices in two Iron Age populations from southern Öland, Sweden2012In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 149, no 2, p. 217-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a study of infant diet at two Iron Age sites on the island of Öland, Sweden. The cemetery at Bjärby contained a large number of subadults who had survived the earliest years of life, whereas most individuals at Triberga had died by 6 months of age. To investigate whether differences in infant feeding could explain the different mortality rates, the carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur stable isotope ratios of bone and tooth dentin collagen from the two sites were analyzed. Twenty-two samples from Triberga and 102 from Bjärby yielded data that could be included in the carbon and nitrogen analysis. Twelve samples from Triberga and 42 from Bjärby were included in the sulfur analysis. The results for carbon (δ13C: Triberga X = -18.8, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = -19.8, s.d. = 0.4), nitrogen (δ 15N: Triberga X = 12.9, s.d. = 1.5; Bjärby X = 13.4, s.d. = 1.4), and sulfur (δ34S: Triberga X = 8.1, s.d. = 1.1; Bjärby X = 5.8, s.d. = 1.3) suggest that diet was broadly similar at both sites and based on terrestrial resources. At Bjärby, females and high-status individuals consumed higher-trophic level protein than other males from early childhood onward. There was some indication that the contribution of marine resources to the diet may also have differed between the sexes at Triberga. No consistent differences in breast milk intake were observed between the two sites, but there was substantial variation at each. This variation may reflect an influence of gender and social status on infant feeding decisions.

  • 47.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory. University of Tromso, Norway.
    Infant feeding practices at the Pitted Ware Culture site of Ajvide, Gotland2014In: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 42, p. 42-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The infant feeding practices used at the Pitted Ware Culture (PWC) site of Ajvide on the Baltic island of Gotland were investigated using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratio analysis. The PWC weremarine hunters with a seal-based economy who lived in the Baltic region during the Middle Neolithic, and were contemporary with the farming Funnel Beaker and Boat Axe Cultures. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of bone collagen from adult females (14 individuals) and bone and dentine collagen from subadult individuals (23 individuals, 55 samples) from Ajvide were analysed. The results showed that the majority of infants continued breastfeeding into the third or fourth year of life. There was some variation in the types of supplementary foods used and the timing of their introduction, perhaps due to seasonal variation in the availability of different resources. One infant, a neonate, had carbonand nitrogen isotope ratios indicative of a much more terrestrial diet than usually consumed by the PWC, suggesting contact with the Neolithic farming populations in the Baltic region. Comparison of the results from Ajvide to those from other PWC sites in the Baltic region reveals that both adult and subadult dietary practices differed slightly between sites.

  • 48.
    Howcroft, Rachel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    The Milky Way: The implications of using animal milkproducts in infant feeding2012In: Anthropozoologica, ISSN 0761-3032, E-ISSN 2107-0881, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 31-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Animal milks have been used in infant feeding for at least a few millennia, but this can only have become a common practice after the domestication of dairy animals during the Neolithic. Neolithic population increase has often been attributed to the effect of a reduction in breastfeeding duration on female fertility. It is possible, therefore, that animal milks were first introduced to the infant diet at this time as a replacement for the lost breastmilk. Milks are complex liquids and are species specific. The consumption of the milk of one species by the infants of another thus has implications for the welfare of those infants. This paper reviews some of the differences between the milks of three ruminant species and human milk and discusses what the health consequences of introducing these animal milks to the infant diet are likely to have been. It is argued that, except in extreme circumstances, animal milks would fail to adequately compensate for the reduction in breastmilk consumption. Fermented milk products could however have been valuable weaning foods if consumed alongside other iron-rich products.

  • 49.
    Lidén, K.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Nordqvist, B
    Götherström, A
    Bendixen, E
    “The wet and the wild followed by the dry and the tame” – or did they occur at the same time?: Diet in Mesolithic–Neolithic southern Sweden2004In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 78, no 299, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Lidén, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
    Archaeology vs. archaeological science: Do we have a case?2013In: Current Swedish Archaeology, ISSN 1102-7355, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-20Article in journal (Other academic)
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