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  • 1. Adams, Jimi
    et al.
    Lawrence, Elizabeth M.
    Goode, Joshua A.
    Schaefer, David R.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Peer Network Processes in Adolescents' Health Lifestyles2022Ingår i: Journal of health and social behavior, ISSN 0022-1465, E-ISSN 2150-6000, Vol. 63, nr 1, s. 125-141Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining theories of health lifestyles-interrelated health behaviors arising from group-based identities-with those of network and behavior change, we investigated network characteristics of health lifestyles and the role of influence and selection processes underlying these characteristics. We examined these questions in two high schools using longitudinal, complete friendship network data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. Latent class analyses characterized each school's predominant health lifestyles using several health behavior domains. School-specific stochastic actor-based models evaluated the bidirectional relationship between friendship networks and health lifestyles. Predominant lifestyles remained stable within schools over time, even as individuals transitioned between lifestyles. Friends displayed greater similarity in health lifestyles than nonfriend dyads. Similarities resulted primarily from teens' selection of friends with similar lifestyles but also from teens influencing their peers' lifestyles. This study demonstrates the salience of health lifestyles for adolescent development and friendship networks.

  • 2. Holstein Mercer, Katie
    et al.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Distinction through distancing: Norm formation and enforcement during the COVID-19 pandemic2023Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 338, artikel-id 116334Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The unequal spread of COVID-19 was accompanied by disparities in adherence to social distancing. Research is needed on social processes that facilitated widespread adherence to distancing, how they connected with existing resource access and belief systems, and how they potentially strengthened intergroup boundaries. We integrated insights from research on social norms and cultural capital to analyze early pandemic (April–August 2020) qualitative interviews with parents and their teenage children in two higher-resource communities in the United States. Our findings uncovered four interrelated processes that facilitated the rapid establishment of norms around distancing, concurrently strengthening group boundaries. Community members: 1) drew on existing cultural capital to smooth the establishment of new social norms, 2) associated social distancing with individual moral worth and community identity, 3) applied double standards that granted certain exceptions to ingroup members to maintain social cohesion, and 4) drew strong distinctions between their own and outsiders’ social distancing behaviors and moral worth. Our findings articulate social processes that allowed for rapid cohesion around distancing and show how these mechanisms strengthened existing community social boundaries.

  • 3. Jenkins, Virginia
    et al.
    Everett, Bethany G.
    Steadman, Mindy
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Breastfeeding Initiation and Continuation Among Sexual Minority Women2021Ingår i: Maternal and Child Health Journal, ISSN 1092-7875, E-ISSN 1573-6628, Vol. 25, s. 1757-1765Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives Identify disparities in breastfeeding initiation and continuation among sexual minority women (SMW) and determine if known risk factors explain any observed disparities.

    Methods We used data from the 2006 to 2017 National Survey of Family Growth female pregnancy questionnaire. We measured sexual orientation using self-reported sexual identity and histories of same-sex sexual experiences reported by women (heterosexual-WSM [women who only reported sex with men]; heterosexual-WSW [women who reported sex with women]; bisexual, and lesbian. In total, we had 18,696 births that occurred within the last 10 years and used logistic and multinomial regression models to assess sexual orientation disparities in breastfeeding initiation and duration that clustered on women to account for potential multiple births to a woman.

    Results Compared to heterosexual-WSM, infants born to lesbian-identified women had decreased odds of ever being breastfed (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.30, 0.99) and a decreased relative risk of being breastfed more than 6 months (RRR 0.46, 95% CI 0.22, 0.97). Infants of heterosexual-WSW had an increased odds of ever breastfeeding (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.12, 1.74) and increased relative risk of breastfeeding more than 6 months (RRR 1.32, 95% CI 1.02, 1.69).

    Conclusions Our results show that infants born to lesbian-identified women were less likely to be breastfed than those born to their heterosexual counterparts, even after adjusting for several factors associated with breastfeeding behaviors. We found no differences in breastfeeding between bisexual women and heterosexual-WSM. Understanding and addressing the barriers sexual minority women face for breastfeeding is critical for ensuring maternal and child health equity.

  • 4.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Limburg, Aubrey
    Everett, Bethany G.
    Mothers' Sexual Identity and Children's Health2022Ingår i: Population: Research and Policy Review, ISSN 0167-5923, E-ISSN 1573-7829, Vol. 41, nr 3, s. 1217-1239Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual minority women face a plethora of structural, socioeconomic, and interpersonal disadvantages and stressors. Research has established negative associations between women's sexual minority identities and both their own health and their infants' birth outcomes. Yet a separate body of scholarship has documented similarities in the development and well-being of children living with same-sex couples relative to those living with similarly situated different-sex couples. This study sought to reconcile these literatures by examining the association between maternal sexual identity and child health at ages 5-18 using a US sample from the full population of children of sexual minority women, including those who identify as mostly heterosexual, bisexual, or lesbian, regardless of partner sex or gender. Analyses using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N = 8978) followed women longitudinally and examined several measures of their children's health, including general health and specific developmental and physical health conditions. Analyses found that children of mostly heterosexual and bisexual women experienced health disadvantages relative to children of heterosexual women, whereas the few children of lesbian women in our sample evidenced a mixture of advantages and disadvantages. These findings underscore that to understand sexual orientation disparities and the intergenerational transmission of health, it is important to incorporate broad measurement of sexual orientation that can capture variation in family forms and in sexual minority identities.

  • 5.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Limburg, Aubrey
    Pace, Jennifer
    Fomby, Paula
    Family socioeconomic status and children's screen time2022Ingår i: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 84, nr 4, s. 1129-1151Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This mixed-methods study examined whether higher-socioeconomic status (SES) children's digital technology use adhered to contemporaneous pediatric guidelines, how it compared to lower-SES children, and why, as analyses showed, higher-SES children's technology use far exceeded pediatric recommendations.

    Background: 2013 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines recommended limited “screen time” for children. Higher SES families tend to follow guidelines, but digital technology use—simultaneously a health behavior and a pathway for building human capital—has complex implications.

    Method: Quantitative analyses provide new nationally representative estimates of the relationship between social class and 9- to 13-year-old children's technology time (including television), device access, and parenting rules (2014 PSID Child Development Supplement, N = 427). Qualitative analyses of 77 longitudinal higher-SES parent interviews articulated explanatory processes.

    Results: Higher-SES children used technology as frequently as others and in excess of recommendations. Their device access, activities, and agency in adhering to rules, however, differed from others. Qualitative analysis uncovered processes that helped explain these findings: parents' ambivalence about technology and perception that expert guidance is absent or unrealistic, and children's exercise of agency to use technology facilitated by “concerted cultivation” parenting styles, led to higher-SES individualistic parenting practices that supported children's increased non-television technology use.

    Conclusion: Cultures and structures related to children's technology use are in flux, and classed norms and understandings are emerging to construct relevant class-based distinctions around parenting.

  • 6.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. Institute of Behavioral Science and Department of Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Modile, Adenife
    “Dedicated to being healthy”: Young adults’ deployments of health-focused cultural capital2022Ingår i: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 293, artikel-id 114648Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Performances of “health” through diet, exercise, and body size are an increasingly important form of cultural capital transmitted to children. Yet less is known about how socioeconomically privileged young people internalize and deploy that capital or how those less privileged manage their relative lack of capital. How does health-focused cultural capital acquired in childhood shape socioeconomic inequalities, health behaviors, and understandings of health in young adulthood? Our analysis of 113 interviews found that health-focused cultural capital acquired in early life reinforced young adults' socioeconomic and health advantages by helping them claim discipline and morality on the basis of their health behaviors and body size. Two key phenomena tended to be present among our many socioeconomically privileged but not our fewer less privileged participants: family socialization into classed diet- and exercise-related health behaviors resulting in a classed appearance of health (despite less-than-ideal behaviors), and cohesive life course narratives linking these behaviors to hard work and moral worth. Less socioeconomically privileged participants’ understandings of health and healthy behaviors were different, rarely linking health to worthiness and discipline. To understand the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic attainment and health in US society, we must consider how behaviors and group-based norms, identities, and understandings of health coalesce in classed health lifestyles that convey cultural capital.

  • 7. Pace, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Rigles, Bethany
    “I just want her to be happy and healthy”: Deploying broad understandings of health in class-privileged parenting2022Ingår i: SSM - Qualitative Research in Health, ISSN 2667-3215, Vol. 2, s. 100183-100183, artikel-id 100183Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
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  • 8. Steinberg, Hillary
    et al.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    "Optimizing" Health in the Time of COVID-19: How Neoliberal Health Orientations Dictate Families' Responses2023Ingår i: Socius, ISSN 2378-0231, Vol. 9, artikel-id 23780231231207638Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Neoliberal health orientations that emphasize specific health behaviors provide frameworks for how class-advantaged Americans understand themselves and their health. The family is a consequential pathway for such privilege to be enacted. Using dyadic interviews with U.S. parents and teenagers, the authors explore how families in two middle- to upper-middle-class, health-conscious cities reoriented their beliefs and practices around health in response to coronavirus disease 2019. Neoliberal health orientations were still the logic many families used to approach health, even as public health messaging focused on protecting vulnerable groups. The authors find that before and during the pandemic, teenagers experienced intense pressure to maintain a classed, thin body via diet, participation in sports, and exercise. Families that adhered closely to neoliberal ideals and encouraged these practices felt that their health behaviors boosted immune defenses against coronavirus disease 2019. However, parents and teenagers worried about the worsening of their fitness and diet. The authors discuss implications for public health and inequalities.

  • 9. Steinberg, Hillary
    et al.
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Pace, Jennifer
    “Mature Enough to Handle it?”: Gendered Parental Interventions in and Adolescents’ Reactions to Technology Use During the Pandemic2024Ingår i: Journal of Family Issues, ISSN 0192-513X, E-ISSN 1552-5481, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 237-258Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how teenagers reacted to parental regulation of technology. Using longitudinal dyadic interviews with 24 teenagers and their 21 parents in two predominantly white middle-class communities, we explored how teenagers used technology during the COVID-19 pandemic and the differential consequences parental interventions had for teens’ well-being and confidence with technology. Parents’ narratives and actions about technology use were deeply gendered. Boys felt confident about their self-regulation of technology, and parents did not substantially limit boys’ technology use during the pandemic. Girls were less confident about their ability to self-regulate and either worked with their mothers to manage technology, distrusted parents who monitored them, or lacked access to virtual hangout spaces such as video games and social media. The findings illustrate how parent-teen dynamics around adolescent technology use can produce short-term gendered inequalities in teenagers’ well-being and result in long-term disadvantages for girls.

  • 10. Woo, Juhee
    et al.
    Lawrence, Elizabeth
    Möllborn, Stefanie
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen. University of Colorado Boulder, USA.
    Racial/ethnic and gender differences in smoking in early middle adulthood2022Ingår i: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 18, artikel-id 101119Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has documented important differences in smoking rates across race/ethnicity, gender, and age. Much of the research has either focused on smoking initiation among adolescents or cessation among adults, but little is known about racial/ethnic patterns in intermittent and daily smoking across young and early middle adulthood. We therefore use the life course perspective to identify how racial/ethnic and gender differences in smoking unfold across adulthood. Analyses investigate whether racial/ethnic and gender differences exist in the likelihood of daily smoking in early middle adulthood and whether these disparities persist after the inclusion of adolescent and early midlife sociodemographic characteristics and young adult smoking patterns. Descriptive statistics and multivariate binary logistic regression analyses employ recent data from a nationally representative sample of adults using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health; N = 8,506). We find evidence that life course patterns of smoking differ across race/ethnicity and gender subgroups. In early middle adulthood (ages 33–44), White women are more likely to smoke daily than Black or Hispanic women. In contrast, there are no significant differences between White and Black men, but White men are more likely to smoke daily than Hispanic men. These racial/ethnic differences are no longer significant for men when previous smoking is controlled, suggesting that early young adult smoking plays an important role in the development of smoking disparities across race/ethnicity. Further, we find that young adult intermittent smoking is associated with daily smoking in early midlife, and this relationship is stronger for Black, compared to White, men and women. Although Black women display lower odds of daily smoking in early midlife compared to White women, they exhibit a higher risk of transitioning from intermittent to daily smoking. These results highlight the importance of considering a greater diversity of life course patterns in smoking across race/ethnicity and gender in future research and policies.

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