Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Palm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Militant attitudes among Swedish employees: The role of class and social identificationIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a mixed-methods approach, including data from a national sample of 1851 employees and 10 in-depth interviews with various categories of employees, this paper examines what factors influence different attitudes towards industrial action among Swedish employees. It adds to previous research by showing that social class has a strong influence on attitudes, both in terms of its effects on wages and working conditions and in terms of how class identification and class background affects perceptions of (in)justice, which help explain the preference for different strategies in relation to job dissatisfaction.

  • 2.
    Palm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The declining influence of class and ideology in union membership: Consistent but divergent trends among Swedish employees2020In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 351-371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using individual-level time-series data covering the period from 1990 to 2011, this article provides an empirical analysis of how the influence of various aspects of class and ideology on union organization have changed over time in the Swedish context. The primary results indicate that although union density and the influence of class-related aspects and ideology are decreasing, particularly among groups with traditionally high levels of organization, the general trend is not valid for all categories of employees. Rather, it appears that where the tradition of being organized is weaker, the influence of class and class identity is particularly strong. No evidence is identified that supports the thesis of class loyalty vanishing among the young.

  • 3.
    Palm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    There is power in a union: Trade union organization, union membership and union activity in Sweden2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates what factors affect union organization and, to some degree, union activity in the face of declining union density in the majority of Western countries. Union structures have been changing in recent decades, not only in terms of declining membership but also because women and white-collar workers are becoming a more stable part of the membership base, whereas previously highly organized groups, such as blue-collar workers, are in decline. The point of departure for this thesis is that union density changes must be understood on several different levels. Thus, we must investigate changing union density in light of changing institutional settings, changing labour market structures and changing norms and values on the individual level. The thesis consists of three empirical studies investigating union density changes and union activity in Sweden, and an introductory chapter that develops the theoretical and empirical (historical) background. The empirical studies investigate: (1) whether and how the influence of various aspects of class and ideology on union organization have changed over time, (2) the effect of structural change on union density increase and decline, and(3) what factors influence different attitudes towards industrial action among Swedish employees. Results show that union density decline in Sweden since the mid-1990s cannot be explained by any forceful shifts in the labour market structure or individuals’ opinions and/or attitudes related to trade unions to any significant degree. Union density decline in Sweden is of a general nature. However, an increasing divergence in union density across various categories of employees, including, e.g., private-sector vs. public-sector employees, young vs. older employees, employees of foreign origin vs. employees of Swedish origin, and the atypically employed vs. employees with standardized employment, is observed. Moreover, previously strong predictors of union membership, including class identity, ideology, sector of employment and type of employment contract, are in decline, but they still influence union organization and attitudes towards industrial action.

    Download full text (pdf)
    There is power in a union
    Download (jpg)
    Omslagsframsida
  • 4.
    Palm, Johanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Understanding union density growth and decline in Sweden: The role of structural changeIn: Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Union density in most Western countries has shifted during the past 40 years from increasing density to sharp declines. Using individual-level time-series data covering the 1968-2010 period, this study analyses the effect of structural change on union density changes in Sweden. Decompositions of union density change shows quite strong gross effects but relatively weak net effects. The net effect of union density increase is close to zero, whereas the net effect of union decline is quite weak. However, the public-sector increase explains approximately 1/6 of the union density increase between the years of 1968-1981. The decline in public-sector employment, changes in the class structure, declining proportions of employees in the manufacturing industry and in large establishments and of employees with permanent contracts contributed to the decline in 1991-2010.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf