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  • 1.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kuns, Brian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Praktiska, metodologiska och emotionella utmaningar i fält – mot ärligare diskurser om fältarbete inom kulturgeografi2014In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 116-127Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Praktiska, metodologiska och emotionella utmaningar i fält – mot ärligare diskurser om fältarbete inom kulturgeografi
  • 2. Caretta, Martina Angela
    et al.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    “What kept me going was stubbornness”: Perspectives from Swedish early career women academics in geography2016In: Investigaciones Feministas, ISSN 2171-6080, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 89-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rise of neoliberalism is creating inequalities for women as they balance their private lives and career trajectories. Geography as a middle sized discipline bridging the social and physical sciences offers insights into the ways neoliberal policies are felt by early career women (ECW). Using a life course model, this study presents the results of a workshop which sought to explore the ways in which women geographers, in Sweden, perceive and experience obstacles in their career advancement and which coping strategies they put in place to overcome those. The results show the blurring of the ECW ´s work and private lives. We find the experiences of ECW in Swedish geography departments are consistent with those of women in other countries. We conclude that ECW carry extra burdens in their career trajectories as academics due to increasingly neoliberal working environments, lack of mentorship, and an increasing pressure to produce measurable outputs and precarious employment. We argue that initiatives and programs aimed at retaining women in academia need to take on a broader perspective acknowledging the entanglement of women´s private and public spheres.

  • 3.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    (Re)visiting the neighbourhood2021In: Geography Compass, E-ISSN 1749-8198, Vol. 15, no 12, article id e12597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neighbourhoods are complex places, at once familiar and foreign, easily found on a map or bounded by rules only insiders know. Although neighbourhood is a concept, one that we experience daily, it remains conceptually challenging for geographers and planners alike. Nevertheless, and despite its complexity, the importance of the understanding the neighbourhood should not be overlooked, especially in the post-pandemic world. Understanding the neighbourhood as a concept, place and context, poses opportunities for geographers to think-with and think laterally across the demographic information we may have on who lives in a neighbourhood, and towards the integration of lived experiences to our explorations of it. In this paper, we critically review key literature on the neighbourhood since 2015, and discuss recurrent themes from that scholarship: belonging, place attachment, everyday interactions, and spatial formations. We argue that the neighbourhood be considered as a multilayered locale and a site imbued with emotions and meanings located with, in and stemming from place-specific conceptual, temporal, and spatial contexts of the neighbourhood. Our (re)visit of the neighbourhood occasions, we think, an opportunity for geographers to keep in touch with the neighbourhood and shape new discussions around these important 'lived in' spaces and places.

  • 4.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Local Variation in Gendered Family Policy Use: Evidence of Local Gender Contracts?2021In: Spatial Demography, ISSN 2364-2289, Vol. 9, p. 155-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A central and unique part of Sweden’s family policy programme is care leave that working parents can use when children are sick and cannot attend (pre)school. The gender-equal policy entails that parents may divide the leave as they see fit. However, mothers and fathers do not share care leave equally and care leave patterns may vary geographically. The aim of this paper is to examine the interaction between gendered care leave and geographical context using the theory of gender contracts. We ask how geographical variation in fathers’ share of care leave varies by scale, and how both individual factors and geographical determinants, representing local gender contracts, are associated with fathers’ share of care leave. Distinctive from previous work, we use geocoded full-population register data and individualized neighbourhoods at multiple scales in order to be able to better measure contextual effects on care leave use. We find substantial spatial variation in fathers’ share of care leave, with clustering depending on scale level. Using the nearest 200 fathers with young children, a factor analysis summarizes local gender contracts into three factors labelled as elite, marginalization and private sector. Results show that especially living in local gender contract areas identified as “marginalized” positively affects fathers’ share of care leave. Living in the most segregated neighbourhoods has substantial effects on fathers’ share of care leave, but overall, neighbourhood effects are moderate. A gender contract perspective shows negotiations resulting from locally clustered gendered norms and relative resources between partners influence who stays home with sick children.

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  • 5.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Nederlandse vrouwelijke ondernemers in Zweden: Kansen en belemmeringen2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [nl]

    De economische integratie van migranten kan veel beter; een onderwerp dat hoog op de Zweedse politieke agenda staat. Vergeleken met andere westerse landen hebben migranten in Zweden een veel lagere arbeidsparticipatie. Ondernemerschap is een belangrijke manier voor economische integratie, maar het is ook een belangrijke aanjager voor de economie en voor regionale ontwikkeling. Uit onderzoek blijkt dat vrouwelijke ondernemers wat andere paden bewandelen vergeleken met mannen. Dit is het onderwerp van een onderzoeksproject dat ik samen met collega Natasha Webster heb aan Stockholms Universiteit, bij de afdeling Sociale Geografie. Wie zijn deze vrouwelijke ondernemers, wat zijn problemen die zij in Zweden tegenkomen, en hoe staat het eigenlijk met Nederlandse ondernemers?

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  • 6.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Thaise migrantenvrouwen in Nederland en Zweden2018In: Demos - bulletin over bevolking en samenleving, ISSN 0169-1473, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 1-4Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 7.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kvinna, utrikes född och företagare – En heterogen grupp med olika behov2020In: Framtidens Chefer - Nyanlända och utrikes födda kvinnors entreprenörskap / [ed] Hedvig Heijne, Stockholm: Fores , 2020, p. 20-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is based on Haandrikman’s and Webster FORMAS funded project at Stockholm University examining migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden. Based on register data statistical analysis and 40 economic life course interviews this chapter highlights the heterogeneity of migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden. We argue that the diversity of women’s experience must be recognized and that policy supports and programs must reflect the range of entrepreneurial backgrounds, with an emphasis on the need for long-term supports.

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  • 8.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Migrant, woman and business owner: A heterogeneous group with diverse needs2020Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines migrant women’s entrepreneurship based on statistical analysis of register data and analysis of 36 economic life course interviews with migrant women entrepreneurs. We highlight the heterogeneity of migrant women’s entrepreneurship in Sweden and argue that the diversity of women’s experiences must be recognized by supporting policies and that policy supports and programs must reflect the range of entrepreneurial backgrounds, emphasizing the need for long-term supports.

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  • 9.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Geographical Variation in Local Gender Contracts in Sweden2021In: Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy, ISSN 1874-463X, Vol. 14, p. 679-701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite Sweden’s national gender-neutral family and social policies, local differences in gender contracts exist and have been related to differences in the structure of the labour market and cultural traditions. Existing studies are outdated and used relatively large administratively defined areas, which may lead to several measurement and interpretation errors. This paper examines geographical variation in gender contracts in present-day Sweden using individualized neighbourhoods on different scales. Gender contracts are operationalized using six indicators on the level of family, politics and labour. We identify five types of local gender contracts: the metropolitan gender contract, the progressive gender contract, the suburban gender contract, the commuter gender contract and the traditional gender contract. The most gender equal patterns are found in metropolitan and other urban areas, with high shares of fathers taking parental leave and the highest shares of women with high education and gainful employment, and low shares of young mothers. The analyses give evidence of considerable local variation instead of a dominant gender contract in each region. The findings may stimulate further research and local policies on gender inequality.

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  • 10.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Duvander, Ann-Zofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Understanding Local Variations in Gender Relations Using Gender Contract Theory2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite Sweden’s family policy existing at the national level, usage of these policies can vary substantially across regions and by gender suggesting a need for closer examination of local variance in these usages. The concept of ‘gender contract’, describes the systematic organization of a gender system that is constructed, controlled and reinforced by relations between men and women and articulated into daily activities such as childcare. This study demonstrates the importance of spatial variation in gender contracts and identifies gender contracts from the gendered use of parental leave in Sweden. Using register data, we create individualized neighbourhoods with fixed population size, based on the location of the residence of individuals. By using a multiscalar approach, we show that local gender contracts vary substantially, and that no dominant regional gender contracts appear instead highlighting local variance of gender contracts. The spatial analyses show the ways in which individuals engage with both structure and society in their daily life. Uncovering gender contracts highlights the ways in which national policies are interpreted locally by users and test the operationalisation of a so far mainly theoretical concept.

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  • 11.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hübinette, Tobias, Hörnfeldt, Helena, Farahani, Fataneh & Rosales, René León (eds.) (2012) Om ras och vithet i det samtida Sverige, Botkyrka: Mångkulturellt centrum. 239 pp.2014In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 49-50Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Svensk-thailändska företagare, Juholts jobb på Island och mjukrock bra för hund2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Thailändska kvinnor som företagare2017In: Norrköpings tidningar, ISSN 1103-9779, , p. 1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Webster, Natasha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Why men buy sex: explaining sex worker clients2016In: Norma, ISSN 1890-2138, E-ISSN 1890-2146, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 301-303Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Parental Leave During Your PhD: Planning, plotting and passing!2018In: The Nordic PhD: Surviving and Succeeding / [ed] Christopher McMaster, Caterina Murphy, Jakob Rosenkrantz de Lasson, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2018, p. 110-116Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Rural-to-rural translocal practices: Thai women entrepreneurs in the Swedish countryside2017In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 56, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the under-researched topic of rural-to-rural interrelations examined through small businesses, owned by Thai migrant women, situated in rural Sweden. Thai migration to Sweden is a gendered flow that often originates in rural areas in Thailand. Drawing on empirical material from Sweden and Thailand, this paper examines the ways Thai migrant women build connections and facilitate flows between rural regions through goods, products, services and human resources. Based on qualitative narrative interviews, it reveals that translocal businesses are contingent upon the local contexts and resources of both source and receiving regions. Findings show translocal practices are gendered and embedded in day-to-day social and economic practices. The translocal perspective suggests insights for supporting rural women migrant entrepreneurs. 

  • 17.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Early-career women in geography. Practical pathways to advancement in the neoliberal university2019In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Forsberg, Gunnel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Spicy Meatballs and Mango Sylt: Exploring Food Practices as a Means to Promoting Entrepreneurship in Rural Sweden2020In: Dipping in to the North: Living, Working and Traveling in Sparsely Populated Areas / [ed] Linda Lundmark, Dean B. Carson, Marco Eimermann, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 241-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When thinking of food in the rural north, a wide range of dishes rarely comes to mind. Rural areas are traditionally seen as static, unchanging and homogeneous. The notion of rural identities representing a hegemonic ideal is seen in the ways food culture is understood in rural areas. With increasing rural diversity, it stands to reason that food culture would diversify as well. Food offers an opportunity for integration and to support a wider range of small businesses. Rural migrant entrepreneurship, particularly for women, remains outside the scope of research, however researchers are beginning to challenge this gap. The implications for not recognizing the wide range of food cultures that are present in rural areas may hinder opportunities for migrant entrepreneurship and integration.

  • 19.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Exploring the Role of Privilege in Migrant Women's Self-Employment2022In: Entrepreneurship: Theory & Practice, ISSN 1042-2587, E-ISSN 1540-6520, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 1534-1568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper launches a discussion for using privilege to understand migrant self-employment. Migrants are a heterogeneous and complex group, yet migrant self-employment studies have not yet considered how privilege provides opportunities or gains. Using mixed-methods this paper explores the role of privilege in migrant self-employment. Life course histories are combined with full-population register data to understand migrant self-employment and to provide a sense of privilege in process. Findings reveal theoretically and empirically how privilege shapes self-employment for women migrants in Sweden with certain groups benefitting more from privilege.

  • 20.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thai women in Sweden: Victims or participants? 2016In: Social Science Asia, E-ISSN 2229-2608, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 13-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration from Thailand to Sweden is a rapidly growing phenomenon with a threefold increase over thelast ten years, with the majority of migrants being female marriage migrants. In Nordic media andpopular culture, stereotyping of Thai-Swedish couples is commonplace, focusing on unequal powerrelations, sex tourism and other social problems which often position Thai women “as both materialistrural women and ignorant victims” (Sunanta, 2013, p. 193). Our paper positions and explores thestatus of this unique group of migrants through a power and agency lens and by adopting a multimethodsapproach. Using register data, we give a detailed picture of the migration and sociodemographicfeatures of Thais in Sweden, while in-depth interviews with Thai women provide nuancedunderstandings of Thai-Sweden migration. We find a complex narrative of migration, where Thaiwomen are active agents in their migration process but still face many inequalities in Sweden. Adiversified picture of these women is revealed suggesting that power and agency are situated spatiallyand temporally.

  • 21.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Kontkanen, Yasemin
    Space and place in immigrant entrepreneurship literature in the Nordic countries: A systematic literature review2021In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 221-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, immigrant entrepreneurship research has developed from exploring a niche economic activity to being a lens through which to explore wider social and economic processes. As the topic grows in importance, research on immigrant entrepreneurship in Nordic contexts is joining these trends, but the unique settings of the region might have been neglected. Space and place underpin many explorations of immigrant entrepreneurship in the Nordic countries, from absolute conceptions of space and place to sensitive portraits of social complexity. Thus, the question the authors address is how space and place are articulated, presented, and interpreted within immigrant entrepreneurship literature in and about the Nordic context. From a systematic literature review of academic articles covering Nordic countries and immigrant entrepreneurship between 2000 and 2019, they found that space and place play a role in immigrant entrepreneurship in Nordic research. However, opportunities remain to engage theoretically with these concepts in order to develop research aimed at understanding immigrant entrepreneurship in the Nordic countries and contribute to a growing need to understand space and place in entrepreneurial activities generally. The authors conclude that there are five potential strategies for incorporating space and place in future research.

  • 22.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Careers Delivered from the Kitchen? Immigrant Women Small-scale Entrepreneurs Working in the Growing Nordic Platform Economy2020In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 113-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, several trends intersect: the gig economy is growing rapidly; immigrants find it challenging to find work; and integration policies increasingly focus on the role of the first job as a benchmark for integration. This empirical study inserts an intersectional perspective into the exploration of the gig economy by examining immigrant women’s daily working experiences within a transactional gig platform, “Yummy”. This food app links home-based chefs to public consumers through online ordering systems. Through in-depth interviews with chefs, the app management team and participatory observations at firm training sessions and food festivals, we explore the complexity of gendered and racialized precarious work from inside the gig economy to consider daily gig life from a feminist economics perspective. The study shows the gig economy does provide entrepreneurial opportunities for new immigrants with these being based on gendered norms. We demonstrate how gendered narratives of idle capacities and women’s work in the home and family spheres are marketized and transformed through the platform. Our study widens the scope of understanding the gig economy by positioning gig work as part of broader social relations between a company, the workers and gender norms.

  • 23.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Centering social-technical relations in studying platform urbanism: intersectionality for just futures in European cities2021In: Urban Transformations, E-ISSN 2524-8162, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Platform-based services are rapidly transforming urban work, lives and spaces around the world. The rise of platforms dependent on largely expendable labour relations, with significant migrant involvement, must be seen as connected, and as replicating larger social processes rather than merely technological changes. This perspective paper urgently calls for an intersectional perspective to better understand social-technical relations crossing the digital-urban interface of platform urbanism in contemporary European cities. Critics of platforms and gig work, to date, have mainly focused on algorithms-based social control, degraded working conditions, problematic employment relations and precariousness of gig work. The ongoing Covid-19 pandemic has both disrupted and amplified these issues, intensifying the vulnerability of gig workers. For example, in Sweden, migrant groups and gig workers were separately identified as being hardest hit by Covid, but with little attention to the interconnectivity between these categories, nor to how these groups are co-positioned vis-a-vis larger socio-economic inequalities. Thus, we argue for a deeper understanding of the social processes underlying platforms and for active investigation of how inequalities are being produced and/or maintained in/by these processes. Urban planners, designers and policy makers will need to actively address the hybrid (digital and physical) urban spaces produced in platform urbanism in order to prevent spatial and economic inequalities. We argue for a stronger recognition of interrelated and overlapping social categories such as gender and migrant status as central to the construction of mutually constitutive systems of oppression and discrimination produced in and through the platform urbanism.

  • 24.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Intersectional understandings of the role and meaning of platform-mediated work in the pandemic Swedish welfare state2022In: Digital Geography and Society, ISSN 2666-3783, Vol. 3, article id 100025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitally-mediated forms of services are increasingly normalized and rapidly transforming working and everyday lives creating new digital-social-spatial relations. The platform economy, in particular, offers new ways of work and new means of consumption. These changes challenge welfare states, both in the operations of institutions and to their foundational social goals and values. In Sweden, with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, social and labour market segregation intersected and amplified inequalities resulting in media covering and querying the nature and role of platform-mediated work within the Swedish welfare context. Located within an intersectional perspective, this study explores how media articulations of platform-mediated work shape theoretical understandings of the platform economy during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden. This was conducted through an ethnographic content analysis (ECA) of Swedish-language newspapers between January and September 2020 (96 articles). We show understandings of the platform economy are active and shifting in temporal and spatial contexts. We highlight how work and working forms tie closely to ideas of equality and welfare in the Swedish context. Intersectional perspectives reveal the central role of power structures in local context – a specific time/place- and decenters normative economic perspectives of the platform economy. This study reinforces the need for more studies on the platform economy that foreground social relations to understand inequalities produced in and through social-technological activities. 

  • 25.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    The Gig Economy: Work and consumption in the digital continuum2024Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This pamphlet outlines key issues in the gig economy and highlights issues that decision makers should consider. 

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  • 26.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Zhang, Qian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Butler, Oliver
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Dissing Christensen, Mathilde
    Cardiff University, United Kingdom.
    Duus, Katrine
    Aarhus University, Denmark..
    Floros, Konstantinos
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kusk, Kalle
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Roelofsen, Maartje
    Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain.
    Thinking through digital mediations and spatialities of platform based work: A roundtable reflection2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a unique roundtable discussion between geographers to explore, contextualizeand problematize the role of geography in the gig economy. It brings together eight researchersfrom across Europe all working with qualitative methods and studying the gig economy. Basedon reflections and commentaries regarding the spatialities and temporalities in and of the gigeconomy, we offer an innovative approach to exploring complicated factors in an emerging andrapidly growing field. We highlight the multiple layers of geography in physical and digitalspaces and the, sometimes blurry, interactions between these. We also show howtemporalities shape the geographies of the gig economy. This paper contributes to developing,deepening and advancing theoretical challenges in understanding the gig economy. It alsobrings these challenges into an accessible, yet thorough publication that can be used inteaching about the gig economy and digital geography. We provide a pedagogical tool tosupport university teachers in using this document in their courses.

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  • 27.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Gender and Social Practices in Migration: A case study of Thai women in rural Sweden2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Set within discussions of gender, migration and social practices, this thesis explores the ways in which Thai women migrants to Sweden build connections between rural areas through their daily activities. Arriving in Sweden primarily through marriage ties, Thai women migrants are more likely to live in Swedish rural areas than in urban areas. Rural areas are typically not seen as a site of globalization or as receivers of international migrants. In contrast to these perceptions, the case of Thai women migrants in the Swedish countryside reveals a complex and vigorous set of social practices that connect rural Sweden across spatial and temporal scales.

    The aim of this study is to explore the ways in which Thai migrant women construct and implement social practices spatially and temporally. Drawing on the life stories of 16 Thai women living in Sweden, along with other sources of empirical data analysed within feminist epistemologies, this thesis discusses: In what ways does gender shape migrant social practices? How are social practices constructed within individual migrant micro-geographies? By what means are migrant social practices contextualized by spaces and places?

    Thai women migrants are gendered agents of these social practices and are utilizing specific resources, objects and networks to bridge the distances found in their daily lives. The empirical material examined in this thesis points to the importance of women’s everyday social practices in connecting and linking rural areas globally at different spatial and temporal scales.

    The results highlight the importance of a translocalism perspective to understanding gendered social practices. This study adds to the translocal discussion by demonstrating that social practices are embedded in multiple geographic sites and scales. Thai women migrants, in this study, emerge as significant actors in global countrysides and do the functional work of bringing spaces and places together daily and through their life course.

    This thesis consists of an introductory chapter and five papers. The introductory chapter outlines the context and theoretical approaches to understanding Thai migration flows to Sweden. The papers share an emphasis on local sites: homes, workplaces and community. They examine different ways that women construct and build social practices – for example, through food, community projects and in developing their businesses.

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    Gender and Social Practices in Migration
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  • 28.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Migrant women entrepreneurs and emotional encounters in policy fields2020In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 37, article id 100730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drawing on 40 economic life course narrative interviews with migrant women entrepreneurs in Sweden from 26 countries, the aim of this paper is to explore the role of emotions while women navigate the Swedish policy field targeting entrepreneurs and thus asks, what role do emotions play in policy fields for migrant women entrepreneurs? Despite widespread acknowledgement that emotions are central to the entrepreneur's motivations and performance, the role of emotions in daily entrepreneurship remains under examined. Using the lens of emotional citizenry, I explore how emotions are part of the entrepreneurial process as seen through migrant women's encounters with various institutional and support actors. Entrepreneurial narratives reflect an embodied and affective subjectivity of interactions centering on individual encounters. I show that encountering a policy field is an emotional process for migrant women entrepreneurs analyzed under two broad scopes: hoping to succeed and hoping to be recognized. This study shows emotions as central to encounters in a policy field and therefore impact migrant women entrepreneurs' engagement in accessing entrepreneurial resources. This paper raises questions for further research on the role of emotion citizenry to understand policy fields.

  • 29.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Vippan Playground: Can a Local Meeting Place Survive in Neoliberal Stockholm?2015In: Localities, ISSN 2234-5663, Vol. 5, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Forsberg, Gunnel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Spicy Meatballs and Mango Sylt: Exploring translocal food practices in rural Sweden2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What role does food play in the migration process? The theme of this paper is to discuss how everyday practices in food preparation could be used as a tool for integration. Food practices effect in-migrant’s everyday life in rural Sweden and support transnational connections. Using rural areas as an example, our interest is on how food related practices are experienced by people with non-Swedish backgrounds and how they combine the experiences from their current rural locality with the practices in their place of origin. Immigrant’s spatial involvements are analysed in order to see to what extent culinary practices can be a channel for integration. Rural areas are of particular interest as the ingredients used for migrant’s culinary ambitions are seldom available. The pursuit of ingredients is an indication of how vital well-known meals are to in-migrant’s well-being. Food plays a special role in the daily lives of migrant women, both socially and economically. They serve as a connection across time and space linking sending and receiving places together. The article presents some examples of integration projects in rural areas and for one significant rural immigrant group in Sweden, namely Thai women. The food-related practices are analysed through the lens of a translocal understanding. 

  • 31.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thai women entrepreneurs in Sweden: Critical perspectives on migrant small businesses2017In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 60, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thai migrant women are an important and visible part of the small business community in Sweden, most notably through restaurants, massage spas and small shops. In this paper we explore the overlap between migration and entrepreneurship and position ourselves within the feminist entrepreneurial framework. We ask: which Thai women become entrepreneurs? How does being migrant women shape their entrepreneurial activities and practices? Our paper employs a mixed-method design to explore Thai migrant businesses, giving a detailed overview of which women become entrepreneurs based on register data, and providing space for the narratives of women. We find a gendered approach to understanding the business activities of Thai women business practitioners does challenge normative perspectives on entrepreneurship. We show that family structure, migration length, education and partner's labor market status all play important roles. Furthermore, we find that small businesses are sites of negotiation and contestation.

  • 32.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Boyd, Meighan
    Exploring the importance of inter-departmental women’s friendship in geography as resistance in the neoliberal academy2019In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friendship has potential as a key coping and self-care strategy among early career researchers (ECR’s) and has been shown to be crucial to overall well-being and sense of belonging, but its importance as a response to career pressures is not well studied. For ECR’s, friendships within the university are situated in a specific structural and institutional context, and formigrant women, this includes an additional aspect of gendered complexity. At the same time friendships may prove difficult as heightened neoliberal metrics emphasize competition forfunding, positions and teaching requirements. Using autoethnographic intra-reflections on the authors’ own friendship, bridging human geography and physical geography, this paper examines friendship of two ECR women from a homosocial perspective where institutional hierarchies and structures may be somewhat equalized. Drawing on the exploration of the authors’ friendship during their PhD years and into their post-doc positions, we reflect on the importance of friendship as an act of support, self-care and resistance. We argue for heightening importance for examining the way friendship creates safe social spaces and offer new insights into the importance of friendships in career paths. Friendship in the neoliberal academy has transformative potential for creating a culture of well-being in geography.

  • 33.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. West Virginia University, USA.
    "Women in Groups Can Help Each and Learn from Each Other?: The Role of Homosocial Practices within Women's Social Networks in Building Local Gender Contracts2016In: Géneros: Multidisciplinary Journal of Gender Studies, ISSN 2014-3613, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 1072-1095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist scholars struggle to articulate gender relations in different contexts. Using the concept of local gender contract - a place specific agreement of gender relations, we explore how women’s networks challenge or shift gender contracts in their communities. Based on two empirical case studies of women´s groups from Eastern Africa and Thai migrants in Sweden, we show gender contracts are challenged through women’s homosocial activities. We highlight tensions between gender contracts and the women’s goals revealing a complicated process of assent and resistance. This study expands gender contract theoretically and provides a way to understand vulnerable women’s activities.

  • 34.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Starting your business in Stockholm? 6 Tips!2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thai women in Sweden: Victims or participants?2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Migration from Thailand to Sweden is a rapidly growing phenomenon with a threefold increase over the last ten years, with the majority of migrants being female marriage migrants. In the media and popular culture, stereotyping of Thai-Swedish couples is commonplace; focusing on unequal power relations, sex tourism and other social problems which often position Thai women ‘as both materialist rural women and ignorant victims’ (Sunanta 2013, 193). Our paper positions and explores the status of this unique group of migrants through a power and agency lens and by adopting a multi-methods approach. Using register data, we are able to give a detailed picture of the migration and socio-demographic features of Thais in Sweden, while in-depth interviews with Thai women provide nuanced understandings of Thai-Sweden migration. We find a complex narrative of migration, where Thai women are active agents in their migration process but still face many inequalities in Sweden. A diversified picture of these women is revealed, giving an inside view into their lives that goes beyond and break common stereotypes.

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  • 36.
    Zhang, Qian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Positioning rural geography into platform economies: Why we need to ask new questions when researching the rural platform economy2024In: Geographies of the Platform Economy: Critical Perspectives / [ed] Mário Vale, Daniela Ferreira, Nuno Rodrigues, Springer Nature, 2024, p. 121-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A rapidly growing body of work explores platform-mediated economy and work under the umbrella term ‘Platform Urbanism’. This focus and academic discourse risk keeping digital spaces and practices in the rural context in the shadow or subordinated to urban-based understandings. Concurrently, digital studies on the rural have for long focused on technocratic approaches to improving information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and connectivity. While recently the potentials of digitalization in transforming agriculture, small businesses, health care, and transportation in rural areas are receiving significant attention, these debates remain surprisingly disconnected from vibrant discussions of the platform economy. Thus, the remaking of rural geographies through the platform economy, and vice versa, remains under-examined. This chapter addresses the importance of spatiality and geography in considering the platform economy with examples of rural small business and agriculture. It illustrates why the nuances and complexity of rural spaces need to become part of understanding the dynamics of the platform economy. Centring rural as important and spatially significant not only lifts the complexity of rural platform processes but also creates opportunities for new questions and patterns. Rural geographical perspectives highlight relational and interlocking spaces found in the rural platform economy and offer the potential for a deeper understanding of social-technical-spatial relations.

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  • 37.
    Zhang, Qian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Örebro University, Sweden.
    Han, Shengnan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ayele, Workneh Yilma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Contextualizing the rural in digital studies: A computational literature review of rural-digital relations2023In: Technology in society, ISSN 0160-791X, E-ISSN 1879-3274, Vol. 75, article id 102373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital technologies are changing how and where we live, work and socialize. Rural areas are distinctive spaces and places but in the current debates of new digital phenomena, digital spaces and practices risk not being contextualized with sensitivities to rural geographies. This study aims to map how digital has been examined to date in rural-focused studies, and accordingly present propositions for how rural-digital studies can be sensitive to the distinctive and diverse character of rural spaces and places. We conduct a two-stage/scale literature review, combining 1) computational topic modelling from a Global Dataset (459 article abstracts) with 2) qualitative content analysis from a sub-dataset focusing on the Nordic region (Nordic Sub-Dataset, 17 full articles). We begin with a topic modelling analysis generating ten major themes (topics) leading to an overview of how research areas are connected to the meaning of rural context. Turning to the Nordic region, as an in-depth example, we illustrate the complexity of rural digital geographies, through a qualitative content analysis. This demonstrates that digital in rural contexts are primarily positioned outwardly as social/regional development and business/economy, and less situated inwardly through individual experience and community building. Combined we show a wide spectrum of rural-digital relations but demonstrate that rural contexts in rural-digital relations need more attention. We propose three propositions to invite deeper rural contextualizations in future digital studies to uphold the importance of rural spaces and places through, by and with digital geography.

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